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Celiac Disease Patients Face Higher Risk of Systemic Lupus

Celiac.com 01/28/2013 - Some case studies point to a connection between celiac disease and systemic lupus, but there hasn't been much in the way of population-based studies.

Photo:CC--NetinhoHoping to get data that would lead to a more solid answer, a research team recently set out to determine levels of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 29,000 patients with biopsy-verified celiac disease.

The research team included J.F. Ludvigsson, A. Rubio-Tapia, V. Chowdhary, J. A. Murray, and J.F. Simard. They are affiliated with the Clinical Epidemiology Unit of Department of Medicine at Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden.

For their study, the team compared the risk of SLE in 29,048 individuals with biopsy-verified CD (villous atrophy, Marsh 3) from Sweden's 28 pathology departments with that in 144,352 matched individuals from the general population identified through the Swedish Total Population Register.

For the study, the team defined SLE incidents as at least 2 records of SLE for any given patient in the Swedish Patient Register. They used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HR).

They found that 54 individuals with celiac disease also had an SLE incident. This amounted to a HR of 3.49 (95% CI 2.48-4.90), with an absolute risk of 17 cases per 100,000 person-years and an excess risk of 12 cases per 100,000 person-years. After five years, the HR for SLE was 2.54 (95% CI 1.57-4.10).

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Even though SLE incidents occurred mainly in female patients, the team found similar risk estimates in men and women.

When they restricted the outcome to individuals who also had a dispensation for a medication used in SLE, the HR was 2.43 (95% CI 1.22-4.87).

The HR for having 2 records of SLE diagnoses, out of which at least 1 had occurred in a department of rheumatology, nephrology/dialysis, internal medicine, or pediatrics, was 2.87 (95% CI 1.97-4.17).

From this data, the team concludes that people with celiac disease faced a three-times higher risk of SLE compared to the general population.

Although this elevated risk remained more than five years after celiac disease diagnosis, absolute risks were low.

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2 Responses:

 
Deborah
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said this on
04 Feb 2013 6:51:49 AM PDT
Lupus is an auto-immune disease that (like most of them) goes into remission when animal products are removed from the diet. Lupus is an example of what happens when celiacs replace a wheat-loaded diet with a diet high in fat & animal products.

 
Gary w
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said this on
01 Dec 2013 9:02:38 PM PDT
What are your qualifications? I have read a lot about autoimmune diseases and this is the first I have heard them linked to meat in the diet. I have heard lots about a link to gluten.




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Even one positive can be diagnostic. This is one: Gliadin deamidated peptide IgG 33.9. If unsure, a biopsy of the small intestine will provide definite confirmation. There is a control test to validate the other ones, but I don't see it there. What is does is validate the others by checking on the overall antibody levels. But it is to detect possible false negatives. A positive is a positive. I think your daughter has joined our club.

My daughter, almost 7 years old, recently had a lot of blood work done, her Dr is out of the office, but another Dr in the practice said everything looked normal. I'm waiting for her Dr to come back and see what she thinks. I'm concerned because there is one abnormal result and I can't find info to tell me if just that one test being abnormal means anything. The reason for the blood work is mainly because of her poor growth, though she does have some other symptoms. IgA 133 mg/dl Reference range 33-200 CRP <2.9 same as reference range Gliadin Deamidated Peptide IgA .4 Reference range <=14.9 Gliadin deamidated peptide IgG 33.9 Reference range <=14.9 TTG IgA .5 Reference range <=14.9 TTG IgG <.8 Reference range <=14.9

Just watch out. I just went to the expo in Schaumburg, IL, and ended up getting glutened. I realized afterward that I ate all these samples thinking they were gluten free, and they weren't. One company was advertising some sugar, and had made some cake, but then I realized.... How do I know if this contains any other ingredients that might have gluten? Did they make it with a blender or utensils that had gluten contamination? Makes me realize the only safe things would be packaged giveaways with gluten free labeling. My fault for not thinking things through. It was just too exciting thinking i could try it all and enjoy without worry.

No fasting required for a celiac blood test unless they were checking your blood glucose levels during the same blood draw.

I wish! I got the flu this winter as well as a couple of colds. I do have 3 lids, the youngest in preschool, so there's always a lot of germs around. Lol