23177 High Levels of Maternal Dietary Antibodies Mean Higher Risk for Non-affective Psychosis in Offspring - Celiac.com
No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

High Levels of Maternal Dietary Antibodies Mean Higher Risk for Non-affective Psychosis in Offspring

Celiac.com 02/13/2013 - A team of researchers wanted to determine whether levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) were associated with a later diagnosis of a non-affective psychotic disorder.

Photo: CC--flequiThe researchers included H. Karlsson, Å. Blomström, S. Wicks, S. Yang, R.H. Yolken, and C. Dalman. They are affiliated with the Department of Neuroscience at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

To accomplish their goal, the team analyzed archival dried blood spots taken from newborns in Sweden between 1975 and 1985 with verified register-based diagnoses of non-affective psychoses made between 1987 and 2003 and comparison subjects matched on sex, date of birth, birth hospital, and municipality.

The team reviewed samples from a total of 211 case subjects and 553 comparison subjects who agreed to take part in the study. They pulled data for factors associated with maternal status, pregnancy, and delivery from the Swedish Medical Birth Register.

They used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to analyze the results for levels of IgG directed at gliadin (a component of gluten) and casein (a milk protein) in eluates from dried blood spots. They then calculated odds ratios for levels of IgG directed at gliadin or casein for non-affective psychosis.

Ads by Google:

Comparison subjects associated with non-affective psychosis showed levels of anti-gliadin IgG (but not anti-casein IgG) above the 90th percentile of levels observed (odds ratio=1.7, 95% CI=1.1-2.8).

This connections was not affected by differences in maternal age, immigrant status, or mode of delivery. They also found that gestational age at birth, ponderal index, and birth weight were not associated with maternal levels of anti-gliadin IgG.

From their study, they concluded that high levels of anti-gliadin IgG in the maternal circulation are associated with an elevated risk for the development of a non-affective psychosis in offspring.

They point out that more research is needed to identify the mechanisms underlying this association in order to develop preventive strategies.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Gaerty, thank you for sharing this with me! You want to know something crazy? The night before you sent this I was googling "vitamin deficiencies linked to splinter hemorrhages" and an article came up about vitamin C deficiency. I can't remember the last time I took vitamin C or drank orange juice or consumed anything that has vitamin C on a regular basis. It's crazy that you responded to this post when you did. My splinter hemorrhage is razor thin and looks like it could be shrinking but it's hard to tell. Also it's not growing out of the nail bed. It stated more in the middle of my right thumb nail. I don't take a multivitamin mainly because I can't find one that doesn't trigger my anxiety. Trying to find a good one that doesn't have energy boosters in it like green tea and extra B vitamins (all my B vitamin levels are great). I haven't been tested for low C vitamin levels but I might have to now. I was tested for some of the base ones that most celiacs have issues with, folate, magnesium, B's, E's, and a couple others and all of them came back good with the exception of my vitamin D3 which in November 2016 was 16 and we tested it again in February, it moved up to 26. Still low but moving up. My liver numbers in October 2016 were bad but by February 2017 they were perfect. I had skin rashes, most of those have cleared up over the past 5 to 6 months, by about 85%, since I was diagnosed. This splinter hemorrhage came up about 7 to 8 weeks ago. Like I said it appears to be growing out but I'm still going to get it looked at. Let me know what your doc says about the vitamin C levels. Also what multivitamin do you take? Ps: I bought some clementines yesterday. Thanks for responding! Spencer

Maybe try a rice based milk, I find the coconut flavoured ones really good with cereal.

I guess they've never felt the political pressure the mainstream cereal producers were under in the age of rickets and pellagra? Plus there's not such a competitive market and its a cost manufacturers would sooner do without if they can, although if Udi's or Genius did start perhaps they'd get more business. I think I'll start eating flax seed again, that was good for fibre I think. I take a vitamin supplement also of course.

Good for you! One suggestion, if you run into another reaction like your Endo, try and ask a question which puts the burden of proof on them, ie: 'Given the positive blood test, on what clinical basis are you excluding celiac?' At least it forces them to be more precise and perhaps exposes any flaws in their reasoning. Although if you reach that stage with a doctor it's probably worth looking for another... If I were a cynic I'd say your Endo had already metaphorically left the building when they were analysing your tests.Your primary seems more on the ball though Best of luck! If and when you go gluten free come back here and there will be plenty of support for you.

Great Image JMG. Thanks for the feedback. I think I feel that the decision to push for further tests, and not shrug it off is the direction I want to go. And I think I may try the diet post-endoscopy, and see if I respond (particularly if my thyroid responds to the diet). Thank you All!