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Gastrointestinal and Non-gastrointestinal Symptoms Vary in Patients with Celiac Disease

Celiac.com 03/25/2013 - More and more, research is showing that celiac disease may have a variety of different clinical presentations. A team of researchers recently used data from Italy, Romania and Iran to explore rates of gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with celiac disease.

Photo: CC--greenflames09The research team included M.J. Ehsani-Ardakani, M. Rostami Nejad, V. Villanacci, U. Volta, S. Manenti, G. Caio, P. Giovenali, G. Becheanu, M. Diculescu, S. Pellegrino, G. Magazzù, G. Casella, C. Di Bella, N. Decarli, M. Biancalani, G. Bassotti, S. Hogg-Kollars, M.R. Zali, K. Rostami. They are affiliated with the Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases Research Center at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran.

For their retrospective cross-sectional study, the team used data gathered Iran, Romania and Italy from May 2009 - May 2011. The study included only cases of celiac disease confirmed by endoscopy, small bowel biopsy and positive serology.

The team collected data on gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, nausea and vomiting, weight loss and flatulence, as well as additional signs and symptoms of iron deficiency anemia (IDA), osteoporosis, hypertransaminasemia, and other related abnormalities.

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The study included 323 women and 127 men with confirmed celiac disease. Average patient age at diagnosis was 34.2 ± 16.47.

A total of 157 patients (34.9%) reported at least one gastrointestinal symptom. Most of those patients reported diarrhea (13.6%), or dyspepsia and constipation (4.0%). 168 patients (37.3%) reported non-gastrointestinal symptoms, most commonly anemia (20.7%) and osteopenia (6%).

The data showed statistically significant differences between the majority of symptoms, compared with the reported clinical symptoms from different countries.

The study showed that European patients commonly complained of upper abdominal disorders, such as abdominal pain and dyspepsia, while Iranian patients commonly complained of the more classic celiac symptoms of diarrhea and bloating. Anemia was the most common non-gastrointestinal complaint for both Iranian and Italian patients, but was significantly higher in Iranian patients.


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2 Responses:

 
geraldine a
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
28 Mar 2013 1:53:59 PM PDT
Can an overweight person be celiac?

 
GlutenFreeRN
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said this on
01 Apr 2013 8:05:29 AM PDT
Absolutely!




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Thank you for taking the time for sharing that info. Don't we have the best disease ever! There's got to be a better way to cut down the scarring. Yes, I've scratched till it bleed. Can't help it. It's like having a bunch of mosquito bites. Yes, only gluten free now. Still have bursts, so probably am being exposed to gluten. Will need to stop dapsone soon. Good luck with your situation.

Best Foods or Hellman's on the East Oast is Gluten free. You can make your own too! Easy! http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/mayonnaise-recipe I buy any brand of sugar.

Are you sure you do not have fractures? I fractured two vertebrae two months after my celiac disease diagnosis DOING NOTHING!!!! Turns out I have osteoporosis from untreated celiac disease. ? Consider a bone scan.

Be sure to let us know how it goes! Help keep them in business by writing a review on Find Me Gluten Free! Enjoy! ?

I'm a naturalist -- I don't use drugs, creams, etc. I do, however, scratch** the rash until I'm almost bleeding and then dump isopropyl alcohol in it -- that relieves the itch for quite some time. (Stings at first though.) I get the rashes on my legs. ANYWAY, I have found that a gluten-free diet is the only (or best) approach -- it's certainly the most natural, in my opinion. It took six months before I felt I was cleansed of gluten. I went nine months (or more) without a rash. Then, I mistakenly ate some soup with barley in it. Got the rash. I let it run its course while getting back to & staying on a gluten-free diet. My best advice is just to stay on a gluten-free diet. Be strong, brave. You can do it! ** I should clarify that when my rashes start itching, I can't help but scratch (excessively). I am not suggesting scratching yourself (with or without cause) as a means to an end. Don't scratch if you can.