No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.







Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Serum I-FABP as Marker for Enterocyte Damage in Celiac Disease

Celiac.com 03/22/2013 - Enterocyte damage is one of the common features of celiac disease, and often results in malabsorption. Presently, doctors don't know very much about the recovery of enterocyte damage and its clinical consequences. Serum intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a marker that allows researchers to study enterocyte damage.

Photo: CC--KezzeA research team set out to determine the severity of enterocyte damage in adult-onset celiac disease, how it responds to a gluten-free diet, and the correlation among enterocyte damage, celiac disease autoantibodies and histological abnormalities during the course of disease.

The research team included M. P. M. Adriaanse, G. J. Tack, V. Lima Passos, J. G. M. C. Damoiseaux, M. W. J. Schreurs, K. van Wijck, R. G. Riedl, A. A. M. Masclee, W. A. Buurman, C. J. J. Mulder, and A. C. E. Vreugdenhil. They are affiliated with the Department of Paediatrics & Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht (NUTRIM) at Maastricht University Medical Centre in Maastricht, the Netherlands.

For their study, the team first determined I-FABP blood levels in 96 biopsy-proven adults with celiac disease, and in 69 patients following a gluten-free diet. They used 141 individuals with normal antitissue transglutaminase antibody (IgA-tTG) levels as a control group.

They found that levels of I-FABP were related to the degree of villous atrophy (Marsh grade) and IgA-tTG. Patients with untreated celiac disease showed higher I-FABP levels (median 691 pg/mL) compared with control subjects (median 178 pg/mL, P < 0.001) and correlated with Marsh grade (r = 0.265, P < 0.05) and IgA-tTG (r = 0.403, P < 0.01).

Ads by Google:

I-FABP blood levels in patients following a gluten-free diet dropped substantially, but not within the range found in control subjects, even though they showed normalization of IgA-tTG levels and Marsh grade. Celiac patients with elevated I-FABP levels who did not respond to gluten-free diet showed persistent histological abnormalities.

The team's main finding was that enterocyte damage, as assessed by serum I-FABP, correlates with the severity of villous atrophy in celiac disease at the time of diagnosis.

Even though enterocyte damage improves upon treatment with a gluten-free diet, the majority of patients still show substantial enterocyte damage despite the absence of villous atrophy and low IgA-tTG levels.

Thus, they conclude that elevated I-FABP levels that do not respond to a gluten-free diet likely point to histological abnormalities and warrant further evaluation.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



2 Responses:

 
Steven M. Weil
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
26 Mar 2013 6:25:49 AM PST
It would be interesting to repeat this study with the addition of a probiotic combined with a gluten-free diet compared to gluten-free diet alone.

 
Barb
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
29 Mar 2013 4:57:09 PM PST
It is likely that they are not studying the fact that all grains have gluten in them. Does not matter the type of grain for the most part.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Diagnosed at 57

Lex_, Again I am afraid Ennis_Tx is right here. Ennis_tx eats right and is eating all the right things and still has to take/supplement with Magnesium. The magnesium is a clue? We need magnesium to make energy. I like to say as chlorophyll is to photosynthesis for the pl...

Lots of people are diagnosed after 50 according to this https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3227015/

Smaller meals throughout the day should help. I had the same problem but if it keeps up you may need to see the doctor again and get surgery. Anti-acids may help out too. It's been about 10 years since I had mine. Good luck.

Nobody posted anything on my profile that I'm aware of but it wouldn't let me get into it. My email got hacked though right around the same time so I just figured it was connected. I'm not exactly Y2K ready. This is the first computer I ever bought and I still have a flip phone. Maybe it's not co...