No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

University of Arizona Gets New Gluten-free Dining Options

Celiac.com 04/19/2013 - The University of Arizona (U of A) has announced plans to add an exclusive gluten-free space as part of their remodeling of the Student Unions' On Deck Deli.

Photo: CC-- Ryan OrrThis makes U of A the latest university to offer more convenient and reliable gluten-free dining services to students with gluten-intolerance or celiac disease.

Fueled in part by increased diagnosis and awareness of gluten-intolerance or celiac disease, and in part by the recent settlement of a lawsuit between L college and the Department of Justice, more and more colleges and universities are taking strong and rapid steps to provide reliable gluten-free food options for students who need them.

Ads by Google:

U of A had already planned to remodel the deli in order to combat an outdated look and falling sales. As part of that process, the university decided to incorporate a strong gluten-free presence in the space, according to Todd Millay, marketing manager of Arizona Student Unions.

“What drove it was the gluten-free and the grab and go. We’re responding to a couple of student patterns and we had the opportunity to integrate those at On Deck Deli," Millay said.

Gluten-free and to-go food options were incorporated in the new design, as well as new signs, new food cases, better lighting and the elimination of order slips. Most of the renovation was in electrical work and cost a little more than $6,000, according to Millay.

Millay said that the University wants gluten-free students to know that they now have a place designed with them in mind.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



2 Responses:

 
Suzanne
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
23 Apr 2013 11:56:03 AM PDT
Thanks for sharing the info! My son has celiac disease and goes to the UofA, and that's exciting to hear he'll have more gluten-free options for eating on campus!

 
Emily
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
31 May 2013 9:54:38 PM PDT
The U of A also has a gluten free club that is very active and involved on campus! Check us out on facebook (UA Gluten Free) or our blog on blogspot (I can't post URLs on here so just google UA Gluten Free).




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

You would think that there is enough people out there, people with celiac disease, that we'd be able to push for a better standard than 20ppm. The problem is the FDA. Too much lobbying involved. It's no different than the fight people are having with Monsanto. I hear that there are several medications that are showing promise in Canada who I think also has a better standard than us.(not positive about that though)

Make sure that you ask the doctor how long she has to stop the supplements before you have her levels tested and be sure to take them all with you when you have the appointment so the doctor knows what she is taking.

Talk to your doctor. With your family history and symptoms he/she may be able to diagnose based on resolution of your symptoms and family history. Also check with your local hospital if it has it's own lab. Mine covered any labs at a greatly reduced cost based on a sliding fee scale. Did you have an MRI before they did the spinal? Celiacs with neuro impact will have white spots on an MRI that resemble the lesions found with MS. Many neuro doctors don't know this. I went through what you did and they did a spinal on me also based on the MRI results. If my doctor had know what the UBOs (unidentified bright objects) were I would have been diagnosed a couple years sooner than I was. Make sure if you supplement that you ask your doctor which ones you need to stop taking and for how long before they do a blood test to check levels. Sublingual B12 is a good idea when we have nervous system issues, but needs to be stopped for at least a week for an accurate blood level on testing. I hope you get some answers and feel better soon.

Thanks for that. Will get her tested for deficiencies. I did take her to a naturopath and get her on a bunch of vitamins, but she never was tested via bloods, so will get on to that, thanks

Hi Could a mod please move this post: and my reply below to a new thread when they get a chance? Thanks! Matt