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Easy Mongolian Beef (Gluten-Free)

Celiac.com 05/01/2013 - Mongolian beef is one of my favorite Asian dishes, but it's often made with Hoisin sauce, which often includes wheat flour, so I usually avoid the temptation to order it when I'm out.

The finished Mongolian beef. Photo: CC--stevendepoloSo, recently, when I was looking for something new to make at home, I turned to Mongolia for inspiration.

This recipe is easy to make, and delivers a tasty version of Mongolian beef that will please most eaters, and help you to liven up your dinner repertoire.

I like more vegetables in my Mongolian beef, but you can make it however you like, adding and subtracting veggies at will.

Ingredients:

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  • 1 pound beef flank steak, thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup gluten-free soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon gluten-free hoisin sauce (I use Premier Japan Brand)
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil, separated
  • 2 teaspoons white sugar
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, minced
  • 1-3 teaspoons red pepper flakes (as desired)
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • ½ white or yellow onion, sliced
  • 1 red bell pepper, sliced
  • 1 cup cabbage, chopped thin
  • 2 large green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 carrot, sliced thin

Directions:
In a large bowl, whisk together soy sauce, hoisin sauce, 1 teaspoon sesame oil, sugar, garlic, and red pepper flakes in a bowl. Mix beef with marinade, cover, and refrigerate at least one hour, and as long as overnight.

Heat 1 teaspoon sesame oil in a wok or large, nonstick skillet over high heat.

Add the onion, green onions, cabbage, carrot, and bell pepper, and cook about 10 seconds. I add more marinade as I add vegetables. A couple tablespoons usually does it.

Mix in the beef, and stir-fry about 5 minutes, until the beef begins to brown.

Serve over rice.

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3 Responses:

 
Sc'Eric
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
06 May 2013 5:16:12 AM PST
I work in a Chinese restaurant and this recipe looks almost spot-on. Some Russian stores offer a plum sauce called Trest "B" that has proven to be without "complications"--but use your own judgement. I use it, plus a dash of Squid (brand) fish-sauce, worcestershire and both rice vinegar and plum vinegar to achieve an authentic flavor. I also like to add water chestnuts, and sometimes bean sprouts to give a fun texture.

Anyway, my point in posting was to offer a fun, fusion variation on traditional Mongolian Beef to add to everyone's repertoire: Mongolian Beef Pizza! Simply order a gluten-free pizza with onions from your local participating shop (if you're lucky enough to have one)... and when you get it home, top it with your home-made Mongolian Beef. It really is stupendous! (If you don't have a gluten-free pizza shop in your area, simply prepare a pizza using your favorite gluten-free shell, spicy pizza sauce, mozzarella cheese, sliced onions and crushed red peppers. Then top with the above recipe!

 
Smokey
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
06 May 2013 1:58:18 PM PST
You need to mention that soy sauce needs to be purchased only if it is stated on the label as gluten-free. Regular soy sauce usually has wheat.

 
Barbara
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
06 May 2013 2:32:37 PM PST
Where can I find Premier Japan Brand hoisin sauce?




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