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Easy Mongolian Beef (Gluten-Free)

Celiac.com 05/01/2013 - Mongolian beef is one of my favorite Asian dishes, but it's often made with Hoisin sauce, which often includes wheat flour, so I usually avoid the temptation to order it when I'm out.

The finished Mongolian beef. Photo: CC--stevendepoloSo, recently, when I was looking for something new to make at home, I turned to Mongolia for inspiration.

This recipe is easy to make, and delivers a tasty version of Mongolian beef that will please most eaters, and help you to liven up your dinner repertoire.

I like more vegetables in my Mongolian beef, but you can make it however you like, adding and subtracting veggies at will.

Ingredients:

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  • 1 pound beef flank steak, thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup gluten-free soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon gluten-free hoisin sauce (I use Premier Japan Brand)
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil, separated
  • 2 teaspoons white sugar
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, minced
  • 1-3 teaspoons red pepper flakes (as desired)
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • ½ white or yellow onion, sliced
  • 1 red bell pepper, sliced
  • 1 cup cabbage, chopped thin
  • 2 large green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 carrot, sliced thin

Directions:
In a large bowl, whisk together soy sauce, hoisin sauce, 1 teaspoon sesame oil, sugar, garlic, and red pepper flakes in a bowl. Mix beef with marinade, cover, and refrigerate at least one hour, and as long as overnight.

Heat 1 teaspoon sesame oil in a wok or large, nonstick skillet over high heat.

Add the onion, green onions, cabbage, carrot, and bell pepper, and cook about 10 seconds. I add more marinade as I add vegetables. A couple tablespoons usually does it.

Mix in the beef, and stir-fry about 5 minutes, until the beef begins to brown.

Serve over rice.

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3 Responses:

 
Sc'Eric
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
06 May 2013 5:16:12 AM PDT
I work in a Chinese restaurant and this recipe looks almost spot-on. Some Russian stores offer a plum sauce called Trest "B" that has proven to be without "complications"--but use your own judgement. I use it, plus a dash of Squid (brand) fish-sauce, worcestershire and both rice vinegar and plum vinegar to achieve an authentic flavor. I also like to add water chestnuts, and sometimes bean sprouts to give a fun texture.

Anyway, my point in posting was to offer a fun, fusion variation on traditional Mongolian Beef to add to everyone's repertoire: Mongolian Beef Pizza! Simply order a gluten-free pizza with onions from your local participating shop (if you're lucky enough to have one)... and when you get it home, top it with your home-made Mongolian Beef. It really is stupendous! (If you don't have a gluten-free pizza shop in your area, simply prepare a pizza using your favorite gluten-free shell, spicy pizza sauce, mozzarella cheese, sliced onions and crushed red peppers. Then top with the above recipe!

 
Smokey
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
06 May 2013 1:58:18 PM PDT
You need to mention that soy sauce needs to be purchased only if it is stated on the label as gluten-free. Regular soy sauce usually has wheat.

 
Barbara
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said this on
06 May 2013 2:32:37 PM PDT
Where can I find Premier Japan Brand hoisin sauce?




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Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

@jddh So...did the restricted diet you were going to implement work (FODMAP or Whole Foods)? I recall that you were mis-diagnosed at one point with refractory celiac disease, but it was later determined that you were getting trace amounts of gluten in your diet. If you are not catching colds, I assume that you have healed from the damages of celiac disease? I hope so!!! ?

Peter is correct. You do have a positive so that warrants further investigation. Here is a link supporting our comments: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/are-raised-dgp-igg-levels-an-early-sign-of-celiac-disease/ http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/it-mmfiles/Celiac_Disease_Diagnostic_Testing_Algorithm.pdf Does she have celiac disease? You will never know for sure without an endoscopy. Even then, there is a chance the biopsies are negative, but keep in mind that she might just be starting to develop celiac disease or that the damage was not captured (the small intestine is the size of a tennis court if spread out). Personally, I tested negative on all but the DGP IgA, yet I had moderate to severe intestinal damage. The celiac blood tests are good, but they do not catch all celiacs, some celiacs can even test negative to ALL the blood tests. Consider yourself fortunate that your doctor ordered several of the tests and not just the screening TTG IgA (very good, keeps cost down, but does not catch all). The DGP is the preferred test in small children. I do not know why it caught me because I am old, but it did! Confusing, isn't it? I wish there was an easier way to diagnose, but we have to work with what we have available to us.

Thank you for your reply, though it's not necessarily what I wanted to hear, it is what I was thinking.

you're lucky you dont catch colds. im the opposite i catch everything very easily and get alot sicker than whoever i caught it from and take much longer to get better.

Even one positive can be diagnostic. This is one: Gliadin deamidated peptide IgG 33.9. If unsure, a biopsy of the small intestine will provide definite confirmation. There is a control test to validate the other ones, but I don't see it there. What is does is validate the others by checking on the overall antibody levels. But it is to detect possible false negatives. A positive is a positive. I think your daughter has joined our club.