No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

What if I Have Villous Atrophy but Negative Celiac Blood Tests?

Celiac.com 06/27/2013 - Patients with villous atrophy and negative celiac disease serologies pose a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma.

Photo: CC--jeporrierWhen doctors are unable to determine what is causing villous atrophy in a patient without celiac disease, they usually classify it as a case of "unclassified sprue." However, doctors currently know very little about the best way to treat and manage cases of unclassified sprue.

To get a better picture of this dilemma, a team of researchers recently examined the connections between villous atrophy and negative celiac serology.

The research team included M. Degaetani, C.A. Tennyson, B. Lebwohl, S.K. Lewis, H. Abu Daya, C. Arguelles-Grande, G. Bhagat G, and P.H. Green. They are variously affiliated with the Celiac Disease Center, and the Department of Medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University Medical Center in New York, USA.

For their study, the team looked at adult patients with biopsy-proven villous atrophy and negative celiac serology, evaluated at our tertiary referral center over a 10-year period.

Ads by Google:

They noted test results for HLA DQ2/8 alleles, antienterocyte antibodies, giardia stool antigen, bacterial overgrowth, total serum immunoglobulins, and HIV. They also recorded treatment, response, and repeat-biopsy findings for each patient.

They found that most of the 72 cases were classified as seronegative celiac disease, medication-related villous atrophy, and unclassified sprue.

The majority of patients diagnosed with unclassified sprue reported symptomatic improvement with immunosuppressive therapy.

Some patients diagnosed with unclassified sprue were found to have villous atrophy associated with the use of olmesartan.

The team encourages further examination of the role of medications in the development of villous atrophy, along with the optimal dose and length of immunosuppression for patients with unclassified sprue.


Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Thanks for the information really appreciated

There are some enzymes you can take to lessen the gut symptoms, they help break it down quicker to get over it faster. Your antibodies will still flare up for the next few weeks and weak havoc with your immune system so it is mostly damage control. Go easy on your gut everyone is different in ter...

Hi all: I was diagnosed with Celiac in 2010 with blood testing and small bowel biopsy. I have been following a gluten-free diet since and a lot of my symptoms and skin problems have gotten better. However, I was at the beach and got bitten by flies and after biopsy of my legs and a whole H...

Yeah my family stopped doing gifts a few years ago when we had a grandparent on each side of the family die. After that no one meets up, no gifts, no one even does cards. I tried 2 years ago to give all my relatives gifts, hand written cards......None of them even said thanks. Next year I said I ...

This paper from 2015 suggests the opposite is true: High Proportions of People With Nonceliac Wheat Sensitivity Have Autoimmune Disease or Antinuclear Antibodies. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/26026392/ Of course correlation does not equal causation, but it is compelling an...