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Study Suggests New Ways To Distinguish Complicated from Uncomplicated Celiac Disease

Celiac.com 07/08/2013 - Right now, the only way for doctors to distinguish between the complicated and uncomplicated forms of celiac disease is to use invasive methods.

Photo: CC-- Ivana VisilijIn an effort to find a way other than these invasive methods to distinguish between uncomplicated and complicated forms of celiac disease, a research team set out to study serum parameters in the spectrum of celiac disease

The research team included Greetje J Tack, Roy LJ van Wanrooij, B Mary E Von Blomberg, Hedayat Amini, Veerle MH Coupe, Petra Bonnet, Chris JJ Mulder, and Marco WJ Schreurs. They are variously affiliated with the Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and Pathology of VU University Medical Centre in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and with the Department of Immunology, Erasmus MC at theUniversity Medical Centre in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

The team's cohort study looked at the possible use of new testing methods, including IL-6, IL-8, IL-17, IL-22, sCD25, sCD27, granzyme-B, sMICA and sCTLA-4 in patients diagnosed with active celiac disease, celiac disease following a gluten-free diet, Refractory celiac disease (RCD) types I and II, and enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL).

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The results showed elevated levels of the pro-inflammatory IL-8, IL-17 and sCD25 in both active celiac disease and RCDI-II. In addition, patients with RCDII showed higher serum levels of soluble granzyme-B and IL-6 compared with active celiac disease patients.

They did not find any differences between RCDI and active celiac disease, or between RCDI and RCDII. However, they did find that EATL patients had higher IL-6 levels compared with all other groups.

This study document a specific series of serum parameters that show that RCDII and EATL have distinct immunological features compared with uncomplicated celiac disease and RCDI. This new method of distinguishing uncomplicated and complicated forms of celiac disease might promote the development of non-invasive procedures in the future.

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1 Response:

 
Hilary
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said this on
16 Jul 2013 3:30:55 AM PDT
Once again a keeper. Thanks, Jefferson.




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All the above posts are full of good advice. What I'd like to add is, if you have coeliac disease and continue to eat gluten, you run the risk of other autoimmune diseases in the future as well as osteoporosis, malnutrition and even cancer, so even if you had no symptoms at the beginning, and may also not have any symptoms if you eat gluten (not all coeliacs do), the damage is still being done to your gut and the rest of your body, so please be aware of this.

You could possibly try calling the places in Texas and Chicago to see if they can refer you somewhere that does accept your insurance. Oh good luck to you!

Hi Jennifer and welcome CyclingLady has given you some good advice above. You want certainty and that's entirely understandable. Go back to your doctors and explain that you need to know a little more and hopefully they will engage positively with you. If they don't, then do pursue a second opinion. I just wanted to address your last paragraph quoted above. The problem with celiac, or in my case non celiac gluten sensitivity, is that it presents or doesn't present in so many different ways. It can do hidden damage which may take many years to become apparent. It can impact in ways which are incredibly difficult to recognise or isolate. I am 'lucky' in that the way that gluten impacts on me is far worse than any mental or social isolation brought upon by the diet, so motivation is easy for me, even without the certainty of a celiac diagnosis, there really is no alternative, I don't think I'd last long on a gluten diet now. But I can well understand how difficult it may be to stay honest on the diet if you don't have any symptoms to deal with. The diet can be isolating, there does become a distance between you and 'normal' people. Who would want to deal with all that if they didn't have to? If you aren't satisfied with your doctors responses and choose to go back onto gluten I suggest you find another doctor and go back into the diagnostic process and properly exclude celiac, including a scope. Otherwise you could be taking a big risk with yr long term health. You may find that this process supplies you with an answer as if your diagnosis was correct your response to the reintroduction of gluten may surprise you, or not of course! best of luck!

There is currently not any enzymes you take that will get rid of gluten, they are working on a promising one to reduce symptoms but all others out there right now are a bust and will not help you much if it all with gluten exposure, Celiac is a auto immune disease, your reacting to the proteins of gluten and it is attacking them and your own body. I do suggest a digestive enzyme if you have food issues in general to help break them down. But this will not fix gluten exposure, reduce damage from gluten, or make gluten eating safe by any means. These current ones on the market are FAD ones target at healthy people and helping them with general digesting of gluten proteins but will not help you if you have celiacs to eliminate gluten reaction symptoms.

Could try causally asking your family to get the blood test done next time they are at the doctors. They could have it and only have minor or no symtoms to it. There is a form of it called silent celiacs with no outward symptoms but it is still destroying your villi and causing your body to slowly degrade. Doing so could shed some light on other issues, make family more understanding to your issues, and help them out in the long run. I was adopted at only a few weeks old, so my issues run a bit deeper with both leaning about this disease and getting anyone in the family to understand it. Does not help my birth mother still to this day refuses to release updated medical records or accept any kind of contact. >.> I give advice all the time, I like to feel useful to others, and can be oblivious to others feelings and reactions due to a form of autism called Aspergers. Bit of a pain, but the feeling of being of use to others is very rewarding even if sometimes confused with being helpful over being a ass or someone overly intrusive. I just wish others had helped me out earlier with this disease. PS Anonymous, you keep posting on older threads, ALOT recently. Not a bad thing, just something I picked up on and piqued my interest/concern with how out of date some information might be.