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How Common is Celiac Disease in Germany?

Celiac.com 10/29/2013 - In an effort to get a better understanding of the prevalence of celiac disease in Germany, a team of researchers recently conducted a randomly selected population sample.

Photo: Ulm City Center--Wikimedia CommonsThe research team included W. Kratzer, M. Kibele, A. Akinli, M. Porzner, B.O. Boehm, W. Koenig, S. Oeztuerk, R.A. Mason, R. Mao, and M.H. Haenle. They are affiliated with the Department of Internal Medicine I at the University Hospital Ulm in Ulm, Germany.

For their population-based cross-sectional study, the team conducted laboratory testing for tissue transglutaminase and antibodies to immunoglobulin A, endomysium and antigliadin in a total of 2157 subjects (1036 males; 1121 females).

Next, the team used a questionnaire, that included celiac-specific questions, to survey all subjects who had been examined serologically

Any individuals with positive antibody titers or with history of celiac disease was sent for biopsy.

On first follow up, the team again measured antibody titers in these subjects and questioned them regarding symptoms specific to celiac disease and celiac-associated disorders.

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Then, for each celiac-positive subject, the team conducted a second follow-up by telephone.

They found antibody tests consistent with celiac disease in eight subjects, corresponding to an overall prevalence of 1:270 (8/2157).

Celiac prevalence among women was 1:224, while it was 1:518 in men. The team found classic celiac symptoms in 62.5% of subjects, atypical celiac disease in 25.0%, and transient celiac disease in 12.5%.

They found three cases of false-negative test results. This yields a sensitivity and specificity of 62.5% and 50.0%, respectively, for tissue transglutaminase immunoglobulin-A antibody; of 62.5% and 71.4% respectively, for endomysium antibody; and of 62.5% and 71.4%, respectively, for antigliadin antibody.

This study charts a celiac prevalence rate that falls within the middle third of comparable European studies. These results call into question the use of a single antibody test for celiac screening purposes.

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You may find these interesting, they're from Professor Marios Hadjivassiliou, a leading expert on gluten ataxia: http://www.acnr.co.uk/pdfs/volume2issue6/v2i6reviewart2.pdf Best of luck helping your daughter

Yep. The one that is most relevant I think is the post by Backtalk. Backtalk went back on gluten and have to a colostomy done on an emergency basis. Not fun. She regretted ignoring the gluten-free diet.

Welcome Lochella Hopefully you can draw some comfort from finally having an answer and thus starting the path to good health. Healing is going to come from your own body as you progress on the gluten free diet and it stops fighting itself and starts repairing that damage. You're still in the very early days and it's not an instant process sadly. 6 months is the usual figure bandied around for seeing significant improvement, although hopefully you'll get some signs of improvement much quicker than that. The single best thing you can do is to eat good simple whole foods and make sure absolutely no gluten gets into your diet. There's some tips here: With stomach pains peppermint tea is my go to drink. Avoiding caffeine seems to help as well as its rough on digestion at the best of times. This may be a time to ease up on alcohol as well and consider dropping dairy, many find they're lactose intolerant but this can correct itself in time. You will find lots of good info, advice and support here, I hope the community is of help to you as it was to me. Best of luck!

I recently got diagnosed with Celiac disease I must of had it my whole life. I'm 35 I've always had severe stomach problems, in and out of hospitals and misdiagnosed until now. My small intestine is severely damaged I'm now waiting to see a dietitian and my specialist wants to see me again in 2 weeks. How do some of you deal with the pain of the healing process and what helps you? I'm in so much pain?

I recently got diagnosed with Celiac disease I must of had it my whole life, in 35 I've always had severe stomach problems in and out of hospitals and misdiagnosed until now. My small intestine is severely damaged in now waiting to see a dietitian and my specialist wants to see me again in 2 weeks. How do some of you deal with the pain of the healing process and what helps you? I'm in so much pain?