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Many Cases of IBS and Fibromyalgia Actually Celiac Disease in Disguise

Celiac.com 12/30/2013 - Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) often occur together, and research indicates that many people with IBS plus FMS (IBS/FMS) might actually suffer from undiagnosed celiac disease.

Photo: CC--RosefirerisingTo better understand the potential connection between the two, a team of researchers recently conducted an active case finding for celiac disease in two IBS cohorts, one constituted by IBS/FMS subjects and the other by people with isolated IBS.

The research team included L. Rodrigo, I. Blanco, J. Bobes, F.J. de Serres. They are affiliated with the department of Gastroenterology at the Central University Hospital of Asturias (HUCA), Celestino Villamil in Oviedo in the Principality of Asturias, Spain.

For their study, the team included 104 patients (89.4% females), fulfilling the 1990-ACR criteria for FMS and the Roma III criteria for IBS classification, along with 125 unrelated, age and sex matched IBS non-FMS patients.

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All patients underwent the following studies: hematological, coagulation and biochemistry test, serological and genetic markers for celiac disease (i.e., tissue-Transglutaminase-2, tTG-2, and major histocompatibility complex HLA-DQ2/DQ8); multiple gastric and duodenal biopsies; FMS tender points (TPs); fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ), health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), short form health survey (SF-36), and visual analogue scales (VAS) for tiredness and gastrointestinal complaints.

Overall results showed that IBS/FMS patients scored much worse values in quality of life and VAS scales than those with isolated IBS (p

These seven patients showed substantial improvement in digestion and symptoms once they adopted gluten-free diets.

The findings of this screening indicate that a significant percentage of IBS/FMS patients actually have celiac disease. These patients can improve symptoms and possibly prevent long-term celiac-related complications with a strict lifelong gluten-free diet.


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5 Responses:

 
nancy D'Antonio
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
01 Jan 2014 1:57:58 PM PDT
We need lots of info and healthy suggestions for eating. I have arthritis, gluten and lactose issues...never diagnosed as IBS or celiac but not sick & feel better on gluten free diet.

 
Lisa
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
07 Jan 2014 12:15:05 AM PDT
My Mother has struggled for the last 10 years with her health (Gastrointestinal issues and FMS) and still continues to feel exhausted and ill, although on medications. I will share this article and continue to encourage her to be GF. Thank you!

 
mary
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said this on
08 Jan 2014 10:52:20 AM PDT
We need to get the medical professionals trained regarding celiac diagnosis and treatment. There are only a very few Doctors and medical people who know anything about celiac and they all seem to be at universities. It is amazing how ignorant the medical profession is regarding this tragic medical condition.

 
Gillian

said this on
16 Jan 2014 8:16:23 AM PDT
Here in Spain it is almost impossible to find a doctor who knows anything much about celiac and gluten intolerance, even worse they don't seem to be interested in finding out and ridicule patients who through necessity have investigated these problems themselves.

 
dkaj
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said this on
03 Aug 2015 6:31:20 PM PDT
One needs to consider that it might not be the gluten per say but the fermentable carbohydrates and fructose in wheat that is causing these patients symptoms. The study does not tell us what the biopsies showed in terms of any signs of villi atrophy, thus they can not make the final conclusion that it is actually the gluten causing their symptoms. SIBO and/or FODMAP intolerance could be causing their symptoms and wheat is a highly fermentable carbohydrate which can bring on both FM symptoms and if dietary changes are not made, can bring on Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth.




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Thanks, I'll look into these. This is what I'd seen re: lanolin in d3. http://www.livestrong.com/article/414363-difference-between-vitamin-d-from-fish-oil-lanolin/

Found this article about a 11 year old with celiac who was forced to eat outside after being told he could not bring and eat his own "Safe" food into Shields Tavern. Biggest point was the social impact it had on the kid and the way it was handled. I think this will bring up a new perspective...

Lanolin to my knowledge is used in skin based applications only, if your needing D3 the best way is to get a sublingual in a dropper you can use there are many available. I personally use Liquid Health and just add it to a drink once or twice a week. https://www.luckyvitamin.com/p-95099-liquid-he...

Which D3 supplements aren't made from lanolin? I had skin inflammation in the past from topical lanolin. I'm not sure if processed ingested lanolin in D3 should concern me, but thought I'd consider a non lanolin version.

Is your concern the social aspects of eating on the job, or not always feeling well enough to get out the door? I'm in health care, and just happened to be in home care when I was diagnosed. It actually works well, as I make my own hours, and can reschedule visits as need be. I would t...