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Lock & Key Antibody Test Could Boost Celiac Disease Diagnosis

Celiac.com 01/01/2014 - By enabling researchers to link antibodies with certain diseases, a new method could help uncover and confirm environmental triggers for diseases such as celiac and autism.

Photo: CC--zebbleThe researchers have two goals, according to professor Patrick Daugherty, a researcher with the department of chemical engineering and the Center for BioEngineering at University of California, Santa Barbara.

First, they want to create diagnostic tests for diseases for which there are currently no blood tests. Next, they want to figure out what causes the diseases.

The process works by mining an individual’s immunological memory—a veritable catalog of the pathogens and antigens encountered by his or her immune system

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Every time we encounter a pathogen, our bodies mounts an immune response in the form of antibodies that are specific for given antigens; molecular, microbial, chemical, etc. Each time our bodies mount this response, they form “memory cells” that are activated by subsequent encounters with that specific antigen. Responses can vary, from minor reactions to serious autoimmune diseases in which the body turns against its own tissues and its immune system responds by destroying them, such as in the case of Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease.

People with celiac disease, for example, will have certain antibodies in their blood that bind to specific peptides—short chains of amino acids—present in wheat, barley, and rye. These peptides are the gluten that trigger adverse reactions in certain people. In the same way that a lock is meant to take only one key, these antibodies will only attach to specific sequences of amino acids that make up the peptides.

The researchers want to figure out which antibodies are linked to specific diseases. “People with celiac disease have two particular antibody types in their blood, which have proved to be enormously useful for diagnosis,” says Daugherty.

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It is gluten free, and often featured at gluten free expos I have attended. It is quite trusted by the community to be free of most allergens. I personally make and sell my own artisan blends of almond butters and prefer those, But I have used sun butter as a tahini substitute in some recipes as I have a issue with sesame seeds. Oddly enough it is and non nutty enough to be mixed savory into things, made a funny dip using garlic and onion with it and served it as a spread. Been years since I did that.

Thank you all very much, I have an appointment with my dermetologist today to look at the rashes I am having because they resemble DH, so I am hoping, given my family history, and if it is the rash they may be able to diagnose me that way, I'll keep my results and bring it to a gastro whenever I can afford to see them. And regaurding the mri yes they did an mri and I did have a lesion on my mri but just one

The company that makes Sunbutter says it is completely gluten-free. Has anyone had a reaction to it? thanks,

The fallout continues from General Mills' recall of nearly 2 million boxes of Gluten Free Cheerios and Honey Nut Cheerios in 2015, which occurred after workers at a California plant accidentally loaded gluten-free oat flour into trucks that had been holding wheat flour, which contains gluten, and which then contaminated batches of "gluten-free" cereal produced with the grain from those trucks. In comments to the U.S. Ninth Circuit court, plaintiffs representing a proposed class of consumers claimed that a lower court had erred in dismissing their lawsuit on the grounds that the company's recall program made the claims baseless. View the full article