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FDA Clarifies Gluten-Free Rules for Restaurants

Celiac.com 01/03/2014 - The United State Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has clarified what their recent gluten-free rule means for restaurants. When the FDA announced its gluten-free labeling standard in August, the agency said that, for restaurants, “any use of an FDA-defined food labeling claim (such as “fat free” or “low cholesterol”) on restaurant menus should be consistent with the respective regulatory definitions.

Amici's Gluten-Free MenuThe agency noted this same approach would now be followed with respect to “gluten-free” claims made in restaurants and other retail food service establishments.

The FDA's updated Question & Answer, #9 under ‘Labeling’, now reads:

FDA recognizes that compliance with the gluten-free rule in processed foods and food served in restaurants is important for the health of people with celiac disease.

In August 2013, FDA issued final rule that established a federal definition of the term ‘”gluten-free” for food manufacturers that voluntarily label FDA-regulated foods as “gluten-free.”

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This definition is intended to provide a reliable way for people with celiac disease to avoid gluten, and we expect that restaurants’ use of “gluten-free” labeling will be consistent with the federal definition.

The deadline for compliance with the rule is not until August 2014, although we have encouraged the food industry to bring its labeling into compliance with the new definition as soon as possible.

Given the public health significance of “gluten-free” labeling, we encourage the restaurant industry to move quickly to ensure that its use of “gluten-free” labeling is consistent with the federal definition and look forward to working with the industry to support their education and outreach to restaurants.

In addition, state and local governments play an important role in oversight of restaurants. We expect to work with our state and local government partners with respect to gluten-free labeling in restaurants. We will consider enforcement action as needed, alone or with other agencies, to protect consumers.

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7 Responses:

 
dappy

said this on
06 Jan 2014 8:04:43 AM PDT
What is important here is more an education of food preparers. They may have an understanding of foods that are listed or considered gluten free and feel that is the end of the story. However, as we all know so well, unless the AREA prepared or cooked in/on is also gluten free - free from cross contamination - then gluten intolerant patrons will undoubtedly still get sick. This component seems unlikely to be easily resolved as so many lower level preparers are totally unfamiliar with what celiac - or even - gluten is....

 
Crystal New
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said this on
07 Jan 2014 8:24:57 PM PDT
Woohoo!!

 
Lula D. Whitield
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said this on
08 Jan 2014 9:10:23 AM PDT
I felt the article was excellent. I am patiently waiting for all restaurants to start severing gluten free food. Some do now but their choices are very limited.

 
Tracy Grabowski
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said this on
09 Jan 2014 5:23:40 AM PDT
Education is the key to getting these establishments on board with appropriate gluten free labeling. These establishments could also serve to profit from being recognized as a "safe" place to eat for GF consumers.

Unfortunately, I don't believe that most restaurants and bakeries understand the importance of the integrity they must have from storage to preparation and all the way through serving the meal or product when they say something is "gluten free."

I have personally seen bakeries label something gluten free. And, the item is sitting right next to "traditional" bakery. Cross-contamination issues are hugely important to recognize as well.

 
Kim
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said this on
12 Jan 2014 2:58:23 PM PDT
I really enjoy the latest up to date information that you put out here for the celiac world. Thanks!

 
Gayle a Weber
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said this on
15 Jan 2014 9:22:42 AM PDT
Cross contamination is a huge deal in restaurants. I should not have to ask that my food be cooked separately if I say first that I'm extremely sensitive to gluten but apparently, I do.

 
P. Austin
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said this on
22 May 2014 11:30:22 AM PDT
I just got off the phone from talking with the FDA regarding their GF regulations for restaurants. They told me, point blank, that although there is a write up about the FDA expecting restaurants to follow suite with the labeling and packaging regulations, that they do NOT regulate restaurants and that the FDA GF regulations are not mandatory for restaurants. All restaurant regulations are entirely up to individual states.




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As mentioned before you said she had rashes, have they checked if that is DH? That is a positive sign of celiac and those with the DH manifestation can have problems getting a postive with the gut biopsy. Here are some links. https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/dermatitis-herpetiformis/ https://www.gluten.org/resources/getting-started/dermatitus-herpetiformis/ Please read up on this. She can get the rash tested for the disease if it is DH.

Thanks for your reply. I will get her retested. She hasn't had any gluten for a year and is very good at not eating it, but had some cake that night. It's so hard because the Dr who did the biopsy said there wasn't any damage so she can't be classed as Coeliacs. She had ten samples taken, but yes, like you say the intestines are huge.

Thank you for your informative reply. Yes I think you are right in that she is still getting dome cross contamination exposure through chopping boards, condiments etc. I will get her bloods redone to see if her levels have dropped and do a gluten challenge again. We all are on a whole foods diet, buy not all Gluten-Free. I find extended family difficult as because she had a negative biopsy they don't believe she could still possibly have it and aren't so careful with her. Thank you for the links, all very helpful.

Why do you make it so freaking hard to sign up? It's easier to find a replacement for rye bread!

I don't know if there is a simple answer to your question but I try to use "choose my plate" as a guide for my meals. https://www.choosemyplate.gov/MyPlate It basically suggests that when you sit down to a meal - 1/2 of your plate is fruits and veggies and the other 1/2 is dairy, carbs and protein. It's a really simple way to look at my meals and see if they are balanced enough. It also suggests getting very few calories in liquid form and avoiding snacking..... Good luck!