No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Screening Benefits First-degree Relatives of Celiac Disease Patients

Celiac.com 03/03/2014 - Spotting celiac disease early is important for optimal patient outcome. However, serological markers of celiac disease aren't much good for spotting mild histopathological lesions in adults at risk for celiac.

A team of researchers recently set out to assess the usefulness of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2/8 genotyping, followed by duodenal biopsy for the detection of celiac disease in adult first-degree relatives (FDRs) of patients with celiac disease.

The research team included L. Vaquero, A. Caminero, A. Nuñez, M. Hernando, C. Iglesias, J. Casqueiro, and S. Vivas. They are variously affiliated with the Gastroenterology Unit, the Pathology Department, and the Pediatric Department of the University Hospital of León, Altos de Nava, with the Institute of Molecular Biology (INBIOMIC), the Microbiology Department and the Institute of Biomedicine (IBIOMED) at the University of León, all in León, Spain.

For their study, the team looked at ninety-two adult DQ2/8 positive FDRs. They offered duodenal biopsy irrespective of the serology result or associated symptoms. They then noted clinical features, associated autoimmune diseases and biochemical parameters.

The team conducted duodenal biopsies on sixty-seven FDRs, averaging 34 years of age. Thirty-two of those patients (48%) showed histopathological changes, which broke down as follows: twelve patients Marsh I (18%), one Marsh II (1.5%), four Marsh IIIA (6%), five Marsh IIIB (7.5%) and ten Marsh IIIC (15%).

Seventeen of the sixty-seven patients (25%) showed positive serological markers, with only one showing Marsh I and the remainder presenting some degree of duodenal atrophy (Marsh III).

Ads by Google:

Thirty-three of the sixty-seven patients (54%) suffered gastrointestinal symptoms, with dyspepsia being the most common complaint.

The distribution of symptoms, anaemia and autoimmune disease was not changed by a patient's duodenal histopathological stage.

Overall, in first-degree relatives, current blood-based screening would diagnose 50% of the cases that displayed any celiac disease characteristic, and miss 6% of the cases with mucosal atrophy.

From these results, the team concludes that adult first-degree relatives of patients with celiac disease can benefit from a screening strategy on the basis of HLA-DQ genotyping, followed by a duodenal biopsy.

FDRs with gastrointestinal and other symptoms may see improvement on a gluten-free diet.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


I have a friend with MS, another with breast cancer and a third with RA. At the same age my only problem is I cannot eat gluten! So when I start getting frustrated about food I think about that and how lucky I truly am. Once you get in the swing of it it gets easier and then you start to feel ...

I know I needed the confirmation. My hubby went gluten free per the very poor advice from my allergist and his GP. It worked, but we really do not know if he has celiac disease. He refuses to do a gluten challenge and I do not blame him. We do know that gluten makes him sick. He has been gl...

Yes, I used to write a lot, for work and pleasure. Now, not so much. Which probably explains why you guys have to suffer the occasional bout of nonsense!

Some cookware you can get rid of the gluten by running in the oven clean cycle then scrubbing. Gluten is a protein not a germ, so disinfectant will not get rid of it but high heat above 500F can destroy the proteins. This way you can save cast iron and some baking pans/sheets. To make double sure...

JMG, I just read your link and the posts about your non celiac diagnosis and although they are about a painful experience, they are enjoyable to read. You are very talented. Have any of your jobs involved writing?