No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Mysteriously Infertile Woman Conceives After Celiac Diagnosis, Gluten-free Diet

Celiac.com 07/04/2014 - Celiac disease can be a factor in many cases of unexplained infertility in women. The recent case in Orlando, Florida of a woman named Vicky Crust, serves to drive home that fact, and to illustrate the potential benefits of a gluten-free diet in such cases.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons--docuCrust suffered for years from abdominal pain, constipation, weight loss and a skin rash that overtook her nose, mouth and legs. Now, in spite of all these symptoms, Crust married, and began trying to start a family with her husband. She conceived twice, but was unable to carry full term. She couldn’t figure it out, and neither could doctors. Doctor after doctor failed to diagnose her celiac disease, and her symptoms grew worse as she progressed into her twenties.

In 2010, Crust was diagnosed with celiac disease and her doctors at the Mayo Clinic believed that because she was otherwise healthy, she could have a successful pregnancy if she adopted a gluten-free lifestyle. Now, to be fair to Crust’s earlier doctors, celiac disease can be hard to spot. "Not everybody has symptoms. Not everybody may have the rash, the diarrhea, just overall weakness and other manifestations of celiac disease," says Dr. Christine Greves, an OB-GYN at Winnie Palmer in Orlando.

Ads by Google:

After her diagnosis, Crust embraced a gluten-free diet, and that paid off nicely for her. Her rash healed, her stomach pains disappeared, and, most delightfully of all, she became pregnant. "My life is great now. I couldn't conceive before and now I am six months pregnant," she said. Obviously, celiac disease will not be a factor in every case of unexplained fertility, and a great deal more work needs to be done.

However, Crust’s story is by no means rare, and is perhaps emblematic of the effects of celiac disease and the importance of getting a proper diagnosis, and adopting a gluten-free diet once diagnosed.

Do you know anyone with a similar story?

This story was first reported by WESH in Orlando, Florida.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



6 Responses:

 
erin
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
04 Jul 2014 12:38:12 PM PDT
I myself had a couple of miscarriages and adopted a gluten free diet. I now have two wonderful children.

 
camom
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
07 Jul 2014 6:39:10 PM PDT
After having my first child I began to have celiac symptoms. Went to doctors and was told I was just an older mom and that was why I was tired. 2 years later tried to have another baby and nothing happened. I went to fertility doctors and tried clomid and other stuff. 6 years later I was diagnosed with celiacs and went gluten free, now I feel great. I often wonder if I could have had more children if I was diagnosed sooner. Try to focus on my blessings, one great kid and I feel great as long as I stay away from gluten.

 
Phyllis
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
07 Jul 2014 11:58:33 PM PDT
This could be a significant issue but the article is really unhelpful for several reasons. 1. It's a sample of one. 2. It is technically inaccurate: the woman was not infertile (unable to conceive) but rather unable to carry a fetus to term. 3. It is not informative: it gives no explanation or hypothesis to help readers understand how celiac disease is related to the history of miscarriages (was it a secondary effect, from maternal malnutrition? or something more direct that has to do with the autoimmune nature of celiac disease? Or...?)

 
Jackie
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
08 Jul 2014 7:37:42 AM PDT
I'm happy for her and her family.

 
Dana
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
08 Jul 2014 10:01:38 AM PDT
My mother and I both had preterm labor with all of our pregnancies but didn't know we had celiac until after. Wish we had known, probably would have been OK and not needed all the meds. There should be a protocol of if you have several miscarriages, preterm labor, etc., test for celiac.

 
laurie
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
17 Jul 2014 4:30:24 PM PDT
I have celiac and had 1 live birth then 2 miscarriages. My daughter had one child and was pregnant with twins. She lost one at 20 weeks. She just went to get blood work today to find out if she has celiac. She is due in August and hope celiac was not the cause. More doctor awareness is needed.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

If you're going to continue to push for a diagnosis stay on gluten! A break could lead to a false negative. It's a lot harder to go off it and then go back on...

I still prefer steaming, but I wash my white rice throughly. I purchase California rice which has a lower level of arsenic. Moderation is key to most everything! ?

I eat pretty much grain free just fine, I eat fats instead. But on a side note I posted some specialty and grain free options as of late in the food alternative page where I list companies and food product alternatives. I honestly just welcomed bread back into my life, I found a company that makes grain free bread out of nut flours. Given you have to toast the dang bread to use it well but seems to work decently. Pasta there are carb free versions out there, and there are ones made with quinoa, buckwheat, or other grains, I even know one company that makes nut flour based ones. You can get these gluten-free options and avoid the rice. As to levels of arsenic they do test foods for these, and all should be safe, the trace amounts and the sheer amount you would have to eat to get effected is staggering, a bit of rice will not hurt you regardless if your concerned I know gluten-free watchdog does arsenic testing on products you could check and find the "safest ones" for your concerns.

I've forgotten them, just remember the good stuff. Weekends in Baja or Vegas or up Pacific highway to see the Redwoods and Frisco. Watching the sunrise at Mount Soledad and watching it drop into the Pacific in the evening. Carne Asada Burritos on Garnet* Solana beach ale* Gorgeous women entranced by my exotic accent, humboldt county weed, raves at the romper room, *1.99 are you out of your mind Denny Breakfasts, Christmas on the beach, *Beers in the gaslamp quarter. I need one of these * which by the power of my imagination have magically become gluten free AANNNYWAAY... Arsenic in rice. Yeah.

Oh, it definitely struck me as very odd! It also says "no significant increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes". That's their favorite word I guess! My blood work pre-biopsy also showed increase lymphocytes and my primary doctor said it usually means increased inflammation. Doing all the things I can now---filing a complaint, I've emailed my doctors to tell them I'm upset and don't think I received proper care, I'm in the process of trying to see a naturopath that diagnosed a friend of a friend w celiac. I'm going to see if i can get the other blood work done with them---and I've been gluten free for a week and a half!