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Restaurant: Gluten-Free Dining Experience

Celiac.com 07/24/2014 - People that have celiac disease know one of the main concerns is avoiding gluten when they have meals. Their second biggest concern is the possible co-mingling of ingredients that can contaminate otherwise gluten-free food! So how do you eat at restaurants when you have celiac and still have peace of mind?

Photo: CC--zoetnetHere is how:

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  1. Before you are to go out to a restaurant call ahead and ask for the manager, find out if they do offer gluten-free meals that are carefully prepared for people with food allergy (If you are unable to call ahead go online and look the restaurant up to see if they offer a gluten-free menu or gluten-free meal selections, if need be email them). Also ask if the restaurant prepares gluten-free meals in a separate area, and if the restaurant uses different cooking utensils for gluten-free meal preparation.
  2. When you arrive at the restaurant that you have confirmed has gluten-free meals, let your server know you have a "Gluten Allergy" (ok, you can use different terms, and this isn't correct, but it conveys necessity instead of trend) and must eat gluten-free. Ask for a gluten-free menu, if they did not offer one to you. If you feel comfortable ask to speak with the manager or chef at your table, so they know that you have a medical need for a gluten-free diet.
  3. Let your favorite restaurants know that you want gluten-free meal selections and a gluten-free menu if they do not offer that yet. Do not be afraid to ask! Also, online there are cards you can print out and take to restaurants that you can give to server, manager or chefs to let them know that you are in need of a gluten-free diet.

Some restaurants are now getting trained for gluten-free food preparation through National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) and Great Kitchens, so that all the staff is fully prepared and educated on how to handle safe preparation of meals for celiac and gluten intolerant individuals.

Talk about peace of mind; if a restaurant has had the gluten-free food training, know you are safe to eat gluten-free meals there!

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5 Responses:

 
Nancy Graddy
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said this on
26 Jul 2014 7:34:19 PM PDT
This is helpful, thanks.

 
john j acres
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said this on
28 Jul 2014 4:00:58 PM PDT
Being celiac myself I only eat in two types of restaurants which are Thai or Filipino, as I know these are safe places to eat at because they only use rice flour with no risk of contamination.

 
Jennifer
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said this on
28 Jul 2014 9:41:26 PM PDT
Just because the restaurant has had training does not mean it is safe.

 
Quinta
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said this on
31 Aug 2014 7:36:25 AM PDT
I just found out the because of several autoimmune diseases that I have I can not eat gluten. I appreciate any help I can get. I just say gluten allergy because servers can be rude. I went to dinner called ahead and got a gluten free menu. The server asked if I just needed gluten free to lose weight. I teared up because I had to explain my illness in front of everyone.

 
Jill
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said this on
01 Jan 2015 5:36:22 PM PDT
That was rude of the server, but maybe he wanted to know so special care could be taken to avoid contamination. I don't explain other than to say I have a medical condition called celiac disease. It is nothing to be embarrassed about and the servers need to know to really take proper precautions.




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