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Mayo Clinic Says New Celiac Drug Reduces GI and Non-GI Symptoms

Celiac.com 07/28/2014 - One angle being tried by researchers to treat celiac disease involves oral peptides. These are orally administered drugs that would prevent an adverse gluten reaction in people with celiac disease who are following a gluten-free diet.

Photo: CC--michael_hicksThe drugs are intended to prevent adverse reactions from minor gluten contamination or exposure.

In a recent update from the Mayo clinic, Joseph Murray, MD, confirms that larazotide acetate, a first-in-class oral peptide, has ”met the study's primary end point of a reduction in GI symptoms.” Dr. Murray presented the results from the study as a late-breaking abstract at Digestive Disease Week 2014.

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In a celiac disease reaction, the epithelial tight junctions that control paracellular permeability are compromised, and gut permeability increases. This is partly due to an inflammatory immune response to the entrance of gluten peptides into the intestinal lamina propria through these tight junctions.

Larazotide acetate prevents tight-junction opening and reduces gluten uptake, inhibiting gluten- and cytokine-induced intestinal permeability and inflammation in vivo.

This randomized, parallel, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial was conducted at 74 sites in North America. The aim was to evaluate the effect of larazotide acetate on GI signs and symptoms in patients with celiac disease.

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6 Responses:

 
dappy

said this on
04 Aug 2014 3:21:07 PM PST
A waste of research time and money. We need a better solution than this band aid. Put the money to a more specific solution of counteracting the reaction to gluten in the intestine.

 
Jefferson
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
07 Aug 2014 1:08:12 PM PST
As I read it, this new drug does just that. What is your compliant, exactly?

 
Tricia M. Hutto, Pharmacist
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
19 Aug 2014 2:50:22 PM PST
Larazotide does not guard against the long term effect of gluten ingestion for celiac patients. It is designed only to reduce the symptoms that patients experience when they do ingest gluten. This drug is by no means the answer for celiac patients to be able to stop the gluten free diet and not suffer the negative long term effect gluten ingestion will have on the gut.

 
Roberta
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
05 Aug 2014 12:09:44 AM PST
Does anyone know when larazotide acetate will be available for consumer use?

 
Jefferson
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
07 Aug 2014 1:09:44 PM PST
It's currently in early phase trials. If all goes well the company will apply for FDA approval. Still no time frame beyond early trial information. Stay tuned!

 
Anne
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
11 Aug 2014 4:54:15 PM PST
I would love to have something that would help take the worry out of cross contamination when eating out but I am hoping that the enzymes that are in clinical trials will do this. I worry about long term problems when we try to modify a normal response. Zonulin causes leaky gut in everyone - in those with CD the junctions are opened for a longer time. I heard Dr. Fasano say that Zonulin is there for a purpose and we don't fully understand it. Is it really safe to inhibit to inhibit this?




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