No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Gut Bacteria Play Significant Role in Gluten Metabolism

Celiac.com 08/06/2014 - Although the role of human digestive proteases in gluten proteins is quite well known, researchers don’t know much about the role of gut bacteria in the metabolism of these proteins. A research team recently set out to explore the diversity of the cultivable human gut microbiome involved in gluten metabolism.

Photo: CC--Dhilung KiratTheir goal was to isolate and characterize human gut bacteria involved in the metabolism of gluten proteins. The team included Alberto Caminero, Alexandra R. Herrán, Esther Nistal, Jenifer Pérez-Andrés, Luis Vaquero, Santiago Vivas, José María G. Ruiz de Morales, Silvia M. Albillos and Javier Casqueiro.

They are variously associated with the Instituto de Biología Molecular, Genómica y Proteómica (INBIOMIC), the Área de Microbiología, Facultad de Biología y Ciencias Ambientales, and the Instituto de Biomedicina (IBIOMED) Campus de Vegazana at the Universidad de León, León, Spain, and with the Departamento de Gastroenterología, Hospital de León, the Departamento de Inmunología y, Hospital de León, and with Instituto de Biotecnología (INBIOTEC) de León all in León, Spain.

Ads by Google:

For their study, they cultured twenty-two human fecal samples, with gluten as the principal nitrogen source. They also isolated 144 strains from 35 bacterial species potentially involved in gluten metabolism in the human gut. They found 94 strains that metabolise gluten, while 61 strains showed an extracellular proteolytic activity against gluten proteins.

In patients with celiac disease, several strains exhibited peptidasic activity towards the 33-mer peptide, an immune-triggering peptide. Most of the gluten-metabolizing strains belong to the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, mainly from the genera Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Clostridium and Bifidobacterium.

Their findings show that the human intestine hosts numerous bacteria that can use gluten proteins and peptides for food. These bacteria could have an important role in gluten metabolism and could give rise to new treatments for celiac disease.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Welcome! Here is a link to our Newbie 101 thread that you might find useful. I can only comment on those foods that I have in my home or have purchased. 1. Nutella is and it states it in the label. 2. Skippy PB is gluten-free (not stated, but ingrediants are). 3. ...

In the beginning, you might find ANY gluten free bread abhorrent. So, you might wait a few months to give yourself time to forget what wheat bread tasted like.

In my brief research, I did not find any public papers indicating villi blunting for Losartan specifically. There was research and a law suit on olmesartan (other celiac.com members have pointed out). Dr. Hart may have been making clinical observations or has access to medical research that is...

I did find a local store that carries the Canyon House brand and will give that a try. It can be tough as I live in a fairly rural area and we don't have a lot of the resources many of the more urban areas do. It is a 1 hour round trip just to get to the closest town with anything like a Trader ...

Hello, Often drugs that end in ?artan are ARBs, and they work by blocking the angiotensin receptors. I?m not sure what the exact difference is between the two medications you mention, though. Have you called the manufacturer of losartan to see if any of the fillers contain gluten? It might b...