No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Parkinson’s Patient with Celiac Disease Makes Dramatic Recovery on Gluten-free Diet

Celiac.com 09/29/2014 - Can a gluten-free diet lead to dramatic improvement of Parkinsonian symptoms in patients with celiac disease?

Image: Wikimedia Commons.In the January issue of the the Journal of Neurology, researchers Vincenzo Di Lazzaro, Fioravante Capone, Giovanni Cammarota, Daniela Di Giuda, and Federico Ranieri report on the case of a man who saw a dramatic improvement of Parkinsonian symptoms after gluten-free diet.

The researchers are affiliated with the Department of Neurosciences at the Institute of Neurology, Campus Bio-Medico University in Rome, Italy.

Ads by Google:

This case is interesting because it supports a growing body of research that indicates that, in some cases, gluten toxicity might adversely impact the nervous system, producing symptoms identical to classical Parkinson’s disease.

The man in question was a 75-year-old Parkinson’s disease patient with silent celiac disease saw major improvements in his symptoms after a 3-month long gluten-free diet.

Noting the positive results in this patient, and the fact that celiac disease often manifests with only neurological symptoms, even in older patients, the researchers are calling for a deeper exploration to determine if there are higher rates of celiac disease in people afflicted with Parkinson’s disease, or the related multi-factorial neurodegenerative condition known as Parkinsonism.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







4 Responses:

 
S
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
06 Oct 2014 2:52:05 PM PDT
I have to take a prescription, which is also used for Parkinsons, for restless legs. I have been getting B vitamin/magnesieum/Folic acid shots, which have really helped my legs. I tried it as the B vitamin shots were something that helped my Grandmother, who could not absorb B vitamins orally. They said she had pernicious anemia. This was 25-30 years ago and we had not heard of celiac, which my aunt also had. I also try to walk a few miles a day but don't always have time. So there is something related to reduced absorption with celiac. I also read somewhere that 34% of celiacs have restless legs. Maybe you could do an article on that?

 
Jefferson
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
15 Oct 2014 6:49:07 PM PDT
Thanks for your comment! Our anti-spam settings prevent me from posting live links in this area, but do a search for 'restless leg' on celiac.com search bar, and you'll see a number of articles on the subject. I hope that helps.

 
J.polley
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
07 Oct 2014 2:41:33 PM PDT
Unaware of this info. Also, do you have any data about gluten sensitivity as related to FODMAPS?
Thank you.

 
Jefferson
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
15 Oct 2014 6:46:55 PM PDT
I can't paste links into this field for anti-spam reasons, but do a search for FODMAPS on celiac.com, and you'll see a number of articles on the subject.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

I believe the talk around this forum is that cheerios are not gluten free enough for people with celiac at this time. I don't know if anything has changed on that and when their lawyer calls me I'll quickly delete this. haha

Could be we generally say get off of dairy for a few months when going gluten free. The part of the intestines that produce the enzymes, and help break down dairy are associated with the tips of the villi, which are the most damaged if not gone in celiacs. THIS is why most of us end up with a lactose intolerance early on. And most can introduce it later after healing. As to her symptoms with it there was a bunch of research about dairy permeated the gut and causing neurological issues in a autism study I was looking at years ago. And there have been other studies about damaged intestines and how the hormones in milk can easier effect ones body. Personally I also have a huge grudge against dairy on a personal level as it is not natural to suck on a cows tits and drink the stuff, nor your dogs, nor a rabbits......I mean come on even Human Breast milk you would find odd to drink as an adult right? Back in the past dairy was a great way to get calories and fats when there was famine, etc around I mean it is meant to make a calf grow into a 500+lb cow. But on a genetic and hormonal level it is not really for human consumption and now days the whole corporate BS propaganda push and dairy farms shove that oh its healthy stuff down your throat. There are plenty of dairy free options for everything feel free to message me if you need help finding anything I have been dairy free for over a decade.

The full celiac panel checks TTG IGA and IGG, DGP IGA and IGG, IGA, EMA as Jmg stated above. Your test included TTG IGA and IGA. If your IGA was low, a low on TTG IGA would be inconclusive. But your IGA is fine. A high on any one test is a positive for celiac and should lead to an endoscopy for confirmation. So I'd get tested for TTG IGG, DGP IGA and IGG and EMA since there are symptoms. Warning I'm not a doc.

I did a gluten challenge for my endoscopy and requested a second blood test after my follow up with the consultant. I never did see those results but my GP said no celiac was indicated: Which left me gluten free for life, that wasn't an option after the challenge, but with a less satisfactory diagnosis, one by omission rather than the definitive 'you're celiac' one I was expecting. Yes! I have been 'properly' glutened on a couple of occasions but on several more I've detected a change or a reaction based on what could only have been trace amounts. NCGS is as yet poorly understood but patients tend to have more neuro symptoms than digestive. That's definitely been my experience, although it was only after going gluten free that I realised quite how many digestive symptoms I had just been living with as 'normal'. Close friends and family get the full explanation. 'I have an auto immune disease similar to 'coeliac etc.' If they stay awake long enough I'll tell them about the less than perfect testing process I went through or the Columbia Med research and the possibility of a blood test soon. They can see the difference between me on gluten and off it so they understand its not all in my head* If I'm ordering food in a restauarant or asking questions about food prep etc I will often just self declare as coeliac - people are aware of that and understand those requests are medical rather than fad diet based. I don't have any problem doing this, I'm not going to claim that and then cheat on dessert for instance and to be honest I expect once the research is complete the two conditions may wind up alongside others as different faces of the same coin. In the meantime I safeguard my health and avoid getting into a detailed conversation about genuine gluten sensitivity versus faux hipster posturing! *apart from the bits which are in my head

I originally had it on my face and scalp. (22 years ago) First biopsy with dermatologist came back as folliculitis. Then when I had a new outbreak on my upper back, she was able to remove a nice clean blister and we got the diagnosis of DH. She started me on Dapsone (100mg/day) and gluten free diet. Now I take 25-50 mg/day. My understanding at the time was that DH was the skin version of Celiac. Did a lot of research on my own. I met Dr. Peter Green at a Gluten free Vendors Fair and he said that a diagnosis of DH IS a diagnosis of Celiac, even if no other symptoms. So I stay gluten-free