No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Can a Scientific Equation Help to Diagnose Celiac Disease?

Celiac.com 01/26/2015 - Celiac disease occurs along a spectrum, which includes cases where patients have only minor histological abnormalities, or, what is called "potential celiac disease."

Photo: CC--TorleyCan a scientific equation based on immunohistochemical analysis of duodenal biopsies help to better diagnose celiac disease and cases of potential celiac disease? A team of researchers recently set out to assess the potential of immunohistochemical analysis of duodenal biopsies to aid in the diagnosis of gluten-related minor enteropathy.

The research team included A. Tosco, M. Maglio, F. Paparo, L. Greco, R. Troncone, and R. Auricchio. They are affiliated with the Department of Translational Medical Science, Section of Pediatrics, and the European Laboratory for the Investigation of Food Induced Diseases at the University Federico II in Naples, Italy.

For their analysis, the team looked at duodenal biopsies from 56 untreated celiac patients and 56 control subjects, and assessed patients based on CD3 and γδ intraepithelial lymphocytes number, γδ /CD3 ratio, and density of CD25+ lamina propria cells. 

To help them blindly evaluate 61 more biopsies with normal villous architecture, the team used a discriminant equation, that is, an equation that allows them to determine whether the patient has celiac disease based on the four factors noted above. Both celiac patients and control subjects showed widely variable immunohistochemical ranges, and no single parameter showed sufficient specificity for celiac disease. However, by combining parameters for all four markers, the team was able to produce an accurate discriminant equation.

Ads by Google:

The result of the team’s discriminant equation is a score called a Dscore. Their equation is as follows: Dscore = (CD3 x 0.06) - (γδ x 0.119) + (CD25 x 0.012) + (γδ /CD3 x 0.131) - 4.709.

Under the team’s system, patients’ Dscores could be used to correctly point to celiac disease in 97.3% of cases.

When the team applied this equation to a validation set of 61 patients with normal villous architecture and unknown diagnosis, 92.9% of those with a positive score turned out to be potential celiac patients. However, a normal score did not exclude celiac disease.

In certain cases, immunohistochemistry can be helpful for diagnosing celiac disease, but, because it lacks sensitivity, it can miss some potential celiac cases.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



1 Response:

 
celiacMom
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
02 Feb 2015 3:46:23 PM PDT
Great science reporting by Jefferson Adams as always.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Has anyone ever flown with a toaster in your luggage? I have to travel for work in a couple weeks. Staff (me) are being told we have to eat at the meals provided. They have assured me that the hotel will have gluten-free meals for me. I saw the menu for breakfast, and I can't imagine i...

No corn or grains of any kind in their items that I have found. I get them at my local Wegmans and don't know if they are available where you are. Chebe mixes are also grain free. I used them a lot when first diagnosed. They are also tapioca based.

Shar is one of the leading gluten free manufactures, the company is from Europe and if I recall has even stricter gluten testing guidelines then the US. The company primarily uses corn, soy and starches in the goods so I personally can not try them or vouch for them (allergic). I know many other...

That company is good as far as being gluten free goes however they use a lot of soy protein or flour in their items. When first diagnosed I thought I was being glutened by many gluten free foods that were made in dedicated facilities. It took my doing a food and symptom log to realize the common ...

Would that be Fibromyalgia? I am sorry that you are feeling so much pain. I hope the prednisone works for you. I think Fibromyalgia is a separate issue from celiac disease.