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Healing, Nutritious Chicken Bone Broth (Gluten-Free)

Celiac.com 02/17/2015 - Homemade bone broth is a great foundation for a healthy diet, and helps to promote gut healing, and overall health.

Simmering animal bones and marrow, feet, tendons, and ligaments in water for one or two days turns collagen into gelatin, and produces a rich complex soup of amino acids and highly absorbable minerals like calcium, magnesium, sulfur, silicon, phosphorus, along with trace minerals.

For best results use organic pasture raised, or free-range chickens. Many commercially-raised chickens produce stock that does not gel properly.

Photo: CC--I Believe I Can FryIngredients:

  • 1 whole free-range chicken or 2 to 3 pounds of bony chicken parts, such as backs, breastbones, necks and wings
  • 2-4 chicken feet
  • gizzards from one chicken
  • 4 quarts cold water
  • 2 tablespoons vinegar
  • 1 large onion, coarsely chopped
  • 2 carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • 3 celery stalks, with leaves, coarsely chopped
  • 1 bunch flat parsley

Directions:
If you are using a whole chicken, cut off the wings and remove the neck, and the gizzards from the cavity.

Cut chicken parts, including neck and wings, into several pieces.

Place chicken or chicken pieces in a large stock pot with water, vinegar and all vegetables, except parsley.

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Let stand 30 minutes to 1 hour. Bring to a boil, and skim away any froth that rises to the top.

Reduce heat, cover and simmer for at least 6 to 8 hours, and up to 24 hours. Longer simmering time makes richer and more flavorful broth.

About 10 minutes before finishing the stock, add parsley. This is important, as is adds ionized minerals to the broth.

Remove chicken carcass and any meat and bones with a slotted spoon. If using a whole chicken, let it cool and then strip the meat away.

Keep the meat to use in other meals, such as chicken salad, casseroles, enchiladas. You can also add it to any soup you might make with the broth later on.

Strain the stock into a large bowl and refrigerate until the fat rises to the top and hardens.

Skim off fat and store the stock in covered containers in your refrigerator or freezer.

Use broth liberally whenever a recipe calls for broth.

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3 Responses:

 
Maria
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
23 Feb 2015 11:21:21 AM PDT
Good to know that a simple broth made of bones can be so healthy for you.
Would it still be nutritious if one used a pressure cooker? It would take a lot less time and you could make it more often. But I wonder if it is just as nutritious as cooking it for 24 hours versus say a few hours with the pressure cooker.

 
debbh

said this on
02 Mar 2015 2:46:21 PM PDT
Don't know about the nutritional difference between slow simmer and pressure cooker methods. If you can't cook it continuously for the time needed, I've cooked, cooled, then refrigerated; then cooked and finished the broth/stock the next day. Just remember when you use the stock in your recipes, you will have to add more salt than you would if you were using store bought broth.

 
joannie
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
16 Mar 2016 11:19:41 AM PDT
I use my crock-pot. Just check from time to time.




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