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Blogger Fakes Cancer and Claims Gluten-Free Diet Cure in Book and App

Celiac.com 04/23/2015 - Not only did a gluten-free diet and lifestyle changes NOT cure Australian "wellness" blogger Belle Gibson of terminal brain cancer, but the 23-year-old is admitting that she never actually had cancer in the first place.

An unrelated fake mugshot. Photo: CC--Stephanie CarterGibson published a book and even created a popular cellphone app, "The Whole Pantry," and in the process made at least $300,000 from people who also hoped to cure cancer or other ailments by changing their diet. She had promised to donate a portion of those proceeds to cancer charity, but apparently kept all the money, which proved to be the catalyst for her subsequent downfall.

Deeper scrutiny and investigation of Gibson's claim revealed that she never actually had cancer in the first place.

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Since being revealed as a fraudster, Gibson, 23, claimed that she had been taken in by a German "magnetic therapist" who told her she had cancer in various internal organs, which she never bothered to investigate further before starting a business based on how a change to a gluten-free diet had cured her.

Now, Gibson is in the news for admitting to the Australian Women's Weekly that she never had brain cancer either.

Is it worse that she claimed a gluten-free diet cured her cancer, or that she never had cancer in the first place? 

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2 Responses:

 
Gladys
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
27 Apr 2015 9:52:46 AM PST
Talk about a fraud, those of us with cancer find her really disturbing.

 
K2

said this on
27 Apr 2015 4:49:28 PM PST
"Is it worse that she claimed a gluten-free diet cured her cancer, or that she never had cancer in the first place? "

Claiming a GFD cured her cancer may have convinced some people with cancer to try a GFD instead of legitimate medical treatment so, IMO, offering hope you know is false qualifies as worse.




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