No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Pharmacists Play Key Role in Educating Patients about Gluten in Drugs and Medicines

Celiac.com 05/12/2015 - The current treatment for celiac disease is the avoidance of gluten-containing foods, beverages, and other products by means of a strict gluten-free diet.

Photo: CC--Army MedicineFollowing such a diet can be challenging, but recent FDA labeling rules go a long way toward helping people with celiac disease know with pretty good certainty whether a food product contains gluten, or is gluten-free.

However, When it comes to prescription drugs, medicines, OTC products, supplements, and vitamins, people with celiac disease currently have little guidance. The FDA rules that mandate the labeling of gluten and other known allergens on food product labels does not apply beyond food. There are currently no rules mandating the labeling of gluten in drugs and medicines. That means that your average person with celiac disease might have a hard time finding out which medications, OTC products, supplements, and vitamins may contain gluten, and may experience adverse symptoms from continued gluten ingestion.

A team of researchers set out to assess the role of pharmacists in educating patients and evaluating their medication use to ensure the optimal management of celiac disease. The research team included Ashley N. Johnson, PharmD, BCPS, Angela N. Skaff, BS, PharmD Candidate, and Lauren Senesac, PharmD. They are affiliated with the Pharmacy Practice Drug Information Center, and the Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy Palm Beach Atlantic University West Palm Beach, Florida.

The team celiac disease review included Etiology and Risk Factors, Clinical Presentation and Diagnosis, Factors That May Impair Drug Absorption, Legislation, Management, and Resources. They found that pharmacists do indeed have an essential role to play in educating patients and evaluating their medication use to ensure the optimal management of celiac disease. This often can be accomplished by evaluating the ingredient list, contacting the manufacturer, or utilizing a variety of other resources.

Ads by Google:

Gluten can potentially be introduced and contaminate otherwise gluten-free products during the manufacturing process, although the likelihood is low. Key points to consider are that even if a brand product is confirmed to be gluten-free, it cannot be assumed that the generic version is also gluten-free, and that if a product has a new formulation, appearance, or manufacturer, it is prudent to reassess it and confirm that it remains gluten-free.

When evaluating the gluten content of prescription and OTC products, it should be remembered that gluten can be masked in an excipient.

Starches used as excipients in pharmaceutical products are often derived from rice, potato, or tapioca, which are gluten-free. However, if the source of the starch is not explicitly stated, the excipients may contain gluten. Sources of excipients that contain gluten include barley, farina, kamut, rye, spelt, triticale, and wheat.

Pharmacists play a pivotal role in educating patients about gluten-containing foods, medications, and supplements in order to help them adhere to a GFD and in ensuring that patients receive additional follow-up care, if needed.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



3 Responses:

 
Susan Williams
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
16 May 2015 6:33:31 AM PDT
I would love to know what we as celiacs can do. I was given a medication for three years when both my doctor and pharmacist know I have celiac. I would expect people that go to school not to cause harm would know better.

 
Michael
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
18 May 2015 1:45:07 PM PDT
We absolutely need to push legislatively for a ban of gluten in all medications. I have to ask that my pills be counted by hand with clean equipment, and be taken out of unopened bottles. Business as usual is to dump pills in a counting machine, then put the remainder back in the bottles. The pharmacist forgot once and I took 6 tiny 30 mg pills before they got a message to me. I got glutened pretty badly, with pyloric spasms for 6 days to start with.
I routinely have to wait a week for new medication while the pharmacist calls the generic manufacturers and they in turn have to research the GF status, then one that is found to have no gluten ingredients, and no pharmacological manufacturer guarantees any medication to be gluten-free, i.e. uncontaminated, has to be ordered. You would think that at some point the pharmacy chains would be interested in saving operations cost by petitioning the FDA to get gluten out if the meds. But no, everyone is afraid of and beholden to big bad pharma.

 
Gene Ann
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
30 Jul 2015 12:35:37 PM PDT
That's a joke if you expect the pharmacist to watch out for you! The local chain pharmacy wouldn't even call for me. They gave me the phone number so I could call to check for myself after I had already purchased the medication!




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Hi! My daughter is 19 was diagnosed at age 16. It took about 12-18 month s for her to fully heal from the damage and feel "normal" again. Also because of the damage done she had reactions to dairy, so you may want to try no or minimum dairy until youre fully healed. Just a suggestion. Hope you start feeling well soon!

Hi yall! New to this blog, but really glad it exists because I have lots of questions. First off, I'm Allie! I'm 17 and newly diagnosed Celiac after about 3 years of searching for answers. I initially went gluten-free on the recommendation of a friend, I felt better in about a month and then my pediatric gastroenterologist had me do the gluten challenge, and my symptoms were the worst they have ever been, and ones I barely noticed before became very present. I did the biopsy and was diagnosed, it's been about 2 weeks and my symptoms are still pretty bad, although my diet has no known sources of gluten or cross contamination. Wondering if anyone has any input on healing post gluten challenge, any tips or how long it took for you would be quite helpful! Thanks

Might want to look into a keto diet, I have UC on top of celiacs and keto is working great Yeah I have major nerve and brain issues with gluten, gluten ataxia with nerve issues and brain issues. Seems to cause my body to attack my brain and nerve system. My brain stumbles fogs, and starts looping, the confusion causes me to become really irritable, I call it going Mr Hyde. Like my mind will start looping constantly on thoughts and not move driving me literally mad, or it used to. Now days it is primary the numbness anger but the gut issues and sometimes random motor loss limit me motionless to the floor now days for the duration of the major anger effects. Used to be a lot more mental then painful gut. I did a mental trauma post on it on while back where I came out about all my mental issues with gluten.

^^^^^^ good info, tips and tricks^^^^^^^^^ yes, crumbs will make you sick. also, breathing flour/pancake mix, etc that is in the air because eventually, you're going to swallow some.

Hello I was diagnosed Dec 15 of last year and went totally gluten-free the next day. I actually got worse before I got better - it's a steep learning curve - but now, 4 1/2 months later I'm finally seeing improvement. Hang in there.