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Gluten-free Ale Glazed Citrus Chicken with Arugula

Celiac.com 08/18/2015 - Want to take a sharp turn at the intersection of Boring and Dinner? Want to move rapidly to a new, more exciting suppertime destination? Got some chicken? Gluten-free beer? Oranges, maybe a lemon? Great!

Got some greens? Better? Arugula? Better still. Here's what you do:

The finished glazed chicken. Photo: JeffreyWIngredients:

  • 1½-2 pounds boneless chicken thighs/drumsticks
  • ½ cup of your favorite gluten-free beer (the darker the better)
  • ⅓ cup freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 3 tablespoons orange marmalade
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated lemon zest
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper

Arugula and Oranges

  • 6 cups baby arugula
  • ½ red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tangerine or sweet orange, peeled, segmented
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeeze orange juice
  • 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper
  • 3 tablespoons slivered almonds, toasted

Directions:
Heat oven to 375F.

Combine ¼ cup of beer, orange juice, marmalade, zest and garlic in a small saucepan over medium heat.

Whisk until the mixture comes to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low and simmer 5-7 minutes, or until it begins to thicken slightly.

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Heat a large cast iron skillet over medium high heat and add the olive oil.

Season the chicken with the salt and pepper and add it to the skillet, searing on both sides until deeply golden, about 2 to 3 minutes per side.

After the second side is seared, add the ¼ cup of beer to the skillet and use a wooden spoon to scrape away bits from the bottom of the pan.

Keep the bits, pour in the orange mixture and turn off the heat.

Place the chicken in the oven uncovered and bake for 20 minutes.

Every 5 minutes or so, baste the chicken with glaze from the bottom of the pan.

Serve with steamed rich and greens.

Gluten-Free Arugula Salad with Oranges

Combine arugula, tangerine and onion in a large bowl with a pinch of salt and pepper. Whisk together the oil, juice, vinegar, salt and pepper until combined, then pour half on the greens and toss well to coat. Save the mixture for extra dressing if desired. Sprinkle the almonds on the salad and toss again. Serve immediately with the chicken.

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Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

@cyclinglady thanks for checking in Restricted diet didn't do much. Still had some VA last time they checked. Heath still otherwise fine, so RCD remains unlikely. My sxs kick in lockstep with life stress, so that kind of points to some general IBS stuff on top of celiac disease. Very doubtful I'm getting any gluten in, but fingers crossed my system is just a little hyper-vigilant, as I ponder on this thread.

I have always noticed that the table wine in Europe is pretty damn good! I am a wine lover and so is my husband but he does like his Green's beer.

The reason they set the limit at 20ppms is that through scientific study, they have proven that the vast majority of people with Celiac Disease do not have an autoimmune reaction to amounts below that......it is a safe limit for most. Also, just because that limit is set at 20ppms, does not mean that gluten-free products contain that amount of gluten. Testing for lower levels becomes more expensive with each increment down closer to 0-5ppms, which translates into higher priced products. Unless you eat a lot of processed gluten-free food, which can have a cumulative affect for some, most people do well with the 20ppm limit.

I'm in the Houston area so I'm assuming there are plenty of specialists around, though finding one that accepts my insurance might be hard. This might sound dumb, but do I search for a celiac specialist?? I'm so new to this and want to feel confident in what is/isn't wrong with my daughter. I'm with you on trusting the specialist to know the current research.

Hi VB Thats sounds like a good plan. Would it help to know that a frustrating experience in seeking diagnosis isn't unusual With your IGG result I'm sure a part of you is still wondering if they are right to exclude celiac. I know just how you feel as I too had a negative biopsy, but by then a gluten challenge had already established how severely it affected me. So I was convinced I would be found to be celiac and in a funny way disappointed not to get the 'official' stamp of approval. Testing isnt perfect, you've already learned of the incomplete celiac tests offered by some organisations and the biopsy itself can only see so much. If you react positively to the gluten free diet it may mean you're celiac but not yet showing damage in a place they've checked, or it may be that you're non celiac gluten sensitive, which is a label that for a different but perhaps related condition which has only recently been recognised and for which research is still very much underway. We may not be able to say which but the good news is all of your symptoms: were also mine and they all resolved with the gluten free diet. So don't despair, you may still have found your answer, it just may be a bit wordier than celiac! Keep a journal when you're on the diet, it may help you track down your own answers. Best of luck!