No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Why Do U.S. Asians Suffer More and Deadlier Enteropathy-associated T-cell Lymphoma?

Celiac.com 08/24/2015 - A new study reveals that U.S. Asians experience higher rates of deadlier cases of Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma EATL.

Photo: CC--Kenvin DooleyEnteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma is a rare primary intestinal non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) strongly associated with celiac disease. It is an aggressive disease with a median survival of approximately 10 months (Ferreri et al, 2011).

Previous studies suggest that EATL may be more common in Europe and among Whites, among whom celiac disease is prevalent (Delabie et al, 2011; Ferreri et al, 2011). However, a second type of EATL (Type II) not associated with celiac disease is increasingly reported in Asia (Lee et al, 2005; Sun et al, 2011; Tan et al, 2013).

To date, there have been no comparative epidemiological study in a racially diverse large population. A team of researchers recently set out to conduct such a study. The research team included Pawan K. Karanam, Mohammed Al-Hamadani, and Ronald S. Go. They are variously associated with the Departments of Medical Education and Medical Research at the Gundersen Medical Foundation in La Crosse, USA, and with the Division of Hematology at the Mayo Clinic, and the Mayo Clinic's Robert D, and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Rochester, MN, USA.

The team turned to the two largest public cancer databases in the US: the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database (http://www.seer.cancer.gov); and the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB; http://www.facs.org/quality-programs/cancer/ncdb).

Using these databases, the research team was able to find and compare the cases of EATL by race. They were also able to describe the clinical features and overall survival (OS) for these cases. 

The team's study included all patients with an EATL diagnosis according to International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O: 9717). The team used SEER-18 registries from 2000 to 2011 to calculate incidence.

Ads by Google:

To describe clinical outcomes, they used the NCDB NHL-PUF with patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2012 for clinical characteristics and those diagnosed between 1998 and 2006 for OS. Because CoC-accredited programs report survival data only once every 5 years, OS analysis was possible only for patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2006.

From the data, the team calculated the incidence rate (case/1 000 000), age-adjusted to the 2000 standard US population, according to race (White, Black, Asian/Pacific Islander, American Indian/Alaska native) using seer*stat software version 8.1.5 (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA) and performed risk ratio comparisons using Poisson regression.

They analyzed OS using the Kaplan–Meier method and used log-rank tests to compare survival distributions between race cohorts. The prognostic effect of pertinent clinical variables were studied using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models.

They found that, for the years 2000–2010, the overall age-adjusted incidence rate of EATL in the US was 0·111 per 1,000,000. Asians/Pacific Islanders had a higher incidence rate (0·236) compared with other races [White (0·101), Black (0·107), American Indian/Alaska native (0·128)].

The risk ratio of Asians/Pacific Islanders compared with non–Asians/Pacific Islanders was 2·32 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·39–3·69; P = 0·002].

The incidences for Asians and Pacific Islanders were combined in seer*stat, therefore we could not provide separate incidences for Asians and Pacific Islanders.
All tests of statistical significance were two-sided and P < 0·05 was considered significant.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


The AGA/IgA and AGA/IgG tests are reliable and I am not sure why some consider them not as reliable. They are just the older versions of the current DGP testing, which is more sensitive than the AGA testing. I have full blown Celiac Disease and I failed both AGA tests at diagnosis by high numbe...

Whitepaw, I also meant to say that my friend who has been having gastritis issues since the winter (now it seems to be getting better after tapering off Lanzaprazole and introducing more natural remedies) told me that she used to feel acid in her stomach first thing, too. It is good to know that...

So I have another son with a different autoimmune disorder (jia). But my brother has type one diabetes which I've read is gene related to celiac. I myself have been tested for celiac twice because I have gastro issues with it but it has always been negative. Yes they said it may be while. H...

With omeprazole I never felt entirely good really - some time every day I felt off, but I think it might have been the bloating. Perhaps I never gave it long enough. Yet that nauseous feeling and diarrhea carried on for a few days after I stopped taking it. Now on day four of Ranitidine/Za...

Re: food diary. That is a really good way of keeping a food diary - I always thought it was a question of just scribbling everything down. But categorising things into what one can always tolerate, sometimes tolerate, never tolerate is such a good way of making things seem clearer. Re:...