24341 Will Australia's Gluten-free Barley Set the Beer World on Fire? - Celiac.com
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Will Australia's Gluten-free Barley Set the Beer World on Fire?

Celiac.com 04/29/2016 - Efforts to develop gluten-free version of traditional grains like wheat have been underway for some time, with limited success.

Photo: CC--Allispossible.org.ukNow, scientists in Australia say they've developed the world's first World Health Organization-approved "gluten-free" barley.

Since barley is a key ingredient in traditional beers, you might imagine that the beer viewing world would be keenly interested in such a development, and you would be right.

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Developed by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), the product, called Kebari barley, has already drawn interest from a number of commercial breweries. One German brewery, Radeberger, has already ordered 70 tons of the product.

Kebari is not genetically modified. Instead, it is the end product of "cross-breeding low gluten barley varieties," CSIRO told Reuters. While Kebari is not 100 percent gluten-free, it is bred to contain "10,000 times less gluten than traditional strains, or about 5 parts of gluten per million, well below the World Health Organization's (WHO) 20 parts per million for classification as a gluten-free grain," according to Reuters.

With gluten-free foods and beverages being of the world's fastest growing consumer trends, gluten-free barley could prove to be a very popular ingredient for making celiac-safe beers in the traditional European style.

"A true gluten-free barley variety is a true game changer; there is going to be a massive market for the product," Phin Ziebell, an agribusiness economist at National Australia Bank, told Reuters.

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6 Responses:

 
Dick L.
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said this on
29 Apr 2016 11:46:39 PM PDT
So what sort of ppm of gluten could one expect in beers based on this grain? This could be great if it's low enough.

 
Kevin
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said this on
02 May 2016 12:08:55 PM PDT
I suspect far less than 5ppm, and gluten can't be detected under 3ppm, so bring it on!

 
Leif
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said this on
02 May 2016 11:20:07 AM PDT
I would be happy to guinea pig these new beers.
For, uh...scientific reasons.

 
Gillian
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said this on
03 May 2016 3:05:57 AM PDT
There could also be a market for this barley as GF flour.

 
JazzyJake
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said this on
03 May 2016 5:50:30 AM PDT
I've been drinking the beers from Glutenberg which are made from millet. They are quite good, way better than the awful sorghum based beers. They make an American Pale Ale, an IPA and a blonde ale. I'm very happy to have found a GF beer that actually tastes like beer.

 
Robert B.
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said this on
03 May 2016 11:22:57 AM PDT
If this results in a low-cost GF beer that tastes as good as Aussie or Euro ales, I'm in deep trouble.




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So just to clarify had not consumed any gluten for about 4 days before testing. I was assured by my allergist that it wouldn't affect the test. But what was alarming was that she retested my food allergies (my most recent reaction was two weeks ago) and every food allergy I have came back negative. I don't understand how that is possible. These food allergies developed when I was 20 and I am almost 24 now.

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I have celiac and eosinaphalic esophagitis. I was put on a steroid inhaler recently. I use it like an inhaler but swallow the air instead of breathing it in. You may want to look into EOE and it's relationship to celiac. Just a thought. My swallowing and celiac seem to be related.

You have eat gluten every single day until after testing. And the celiac blood test is supposed to be done as well.

If I was the big guy, there's no way I would have to wait 3 and a half weeks for a test lol. My GI doc never recommended the antibody test. He said doing it with the scope was the only sure way to know. Does anybody know if I should eat a little gluten the day before my test to see if I will get an accurate enough test? Or will it not matter, once the damage is done it's done?