What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? Celiac.com - https://www.celiac.com
How Gluten-Free is Your Water?
https://www.celiac.com/articles/24879/1/How-Gluten-Free-is-Your-Water/Page1.html
Jefferson Adams

Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. His poems, essays and photographs have appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate among others.

He is a member of both the National Writers Union, the International Federation of Journalists, and covers San Francisco Health News for Examiner.com.

 
By Jefferson Adams
Published on 09/14/2017
 

Is your water hip? Is your water cool? Is your water gluten-free? Does it say so on the label? Does it matter?

Gluten-free has become such a marketing buzzword that the words "gluten-free" are now appearing on all kinds of things that most certainly gluten-free, such as, yes, bottled water.

Would you be more likely to buy water labeled "gluten-free?" Would you feel safer? More nourished?


Is your water gluten-free? It better be.

Celiac.com 09/14/2017 - Is your water hip? Is your water cool? Is your water gluten-free? Does it say so on the label? Does it matter?

Gluten-free has become such a marketing buzzword that the words "gluten-free" are now appearing on all kinds of things that most certainly gluten-free, such as, yes, bottled water.

Would you be more likely to buy water labeled "gluten-free?" Would you feel safer? More nourished?

If the bottled water craze wasn't enough in itself, there is now the added marketing factor that turns plain, clean, pure bottled water into "premium" water that is not only gluten- and GMO-free, but also certified kosher and organic.

Never mind that not a single drop in these bottle contains anything but plain water. Plain water, of course, is gluten-free, GMO-free, very much organic, and likely perfectly fine for kosher Jews.

Basically, labels should help people make informed decisions, not confuse them with useless marketing information.

Putting "gluten-free" labels on water likely doesn't help consumers make better decisions about the water they buy, it may just confuse people into believing (wrongly) that some water has, or might have, gluten in it; which is seriously unlikely.

So, in our world, where the catchphrase seems to be caveat emptor, or, buyer beware, it falls on us as consumers to be informed and to resist the empty marketing promises made by products like "gluten-free" water. What's next, a label that says: Guaranteed Wet!?

Got any good stories about confusing or useless "gluten-free" labels on products that clearly don't need them? Share them below.