No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.







Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

The following is excerpted from an article that was published in the American Celiac Society newsletter by Joseph A. Murray, MD of the Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN, who is a gastroenterologist who specializes in treating Celiac disease

Those patients for whom there is a high suspicion for celiac disease should have a small bowel biopsy which can be obtained by an experienced endoscopist in the distal duodendum. The best noninvasive tests available for screening for asymptomatic celiac disease are the specific serological tests. These are of several varieties: the anti-gliadin, anti-endomysial, or anti-reticulin

Ads by Google:

known as immunoglobulin.'); return false">antibodies. Our experience and the literature support the use as of endomysial antibody test as the single most specific and probably most sensitive for celiac disease. This test has now become available in specialty laboratories as well as in a small number of academic institutions. All of the tests should be done with the subjects on a normal gluten containing diet. A combination of endomysial and gliadin testing would seem to be the most sensitive as a screening method. A positive test is not, however, considered to be diagnostic and would usually require a small bowel biopsy for confirmation. A trial of dietary exclusion of gluten is *not* recommended as a diagnostic test without a prior abnormal biopsy.

Because the body will recover when one goes gluten-free, the tests will then come up negative. Without a definitive test one may then stray from the diet, as one will feel well and was never sure that they had it in the first place. As for the two tests: The biopsy will look for flattened villi on the intestinal wall. After one goes gluten-free they will grow back. The blood antibodies are formed as a bodys reaction to the presence of the gluten. If no gluten, then no antibodies are present.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



1 Response:

 
roger kent
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
01 Jan 2008 9:09:55 AM PST
This explained to me why I must have a biopsy. I didn't care for the GI doctor's explanation. It just seemed random cut and slash.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


IF your still getting cramps look into supplementing with Magnesium, either Natural Vitality Calm or Doctors best in the glycinate powder. Depending on other symptoms and the way your body works depends on which form is best. Calm is best if you have hard stools, do not go daily with a BM you sta...

Great minds think alike! ?

There is a test called Biocard available in Canada. It is a home test kit. Should be cheaper than $125. Biocard is NOT a genetic test though. Genetic tests are of limited usefulness.

I got diagnosed with POTS after celiac diagnosis. I get Raynaud's phenomenon, muscle cramps/spasms, and had hives for a year and half. I'm not sure if there is any correlation between the symptoms but a lot of celiacs have multiple issues

Both sets are made on shared lines. That was the point of my response. Many people have gotten sick from Gluten free products from Frito Lay.