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Quinoa Blend Bread and Pizza Crust (Gluten-Free)

This recipe comes to us from A.J. McEvoy.

  • Yeast Mix:
    ¼ cup warm water
    1 ½ teaspoon sugar
    2-teaspoons Red Star yeast (or your favorite gluten-free brand)
  • Dry Mixture:
    1 cup tapioca starch
    ½ cup quinoa flour (or you can try amaranth flour in its place)
    ½ cup sweet rice flour
    ½ cup potato starch
    1/3 cup powdered dry milk
    ¼ cup soy flour
    3 tablespoons sugar (I prefer C&H Ultra-Fine Bakers Sugar; it mixes best)
    2 teaspoons xanthan Gum
  • Wet Mixture:
    2 large eggs, well beaten
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 cup warm water
    ¾ teaspoon apple cider or wine vinegar

Start yeast mix, and leave it in a warm (not HOT) place so it can grow while you mix the other ingredients. By the time the other ingredients are combined, the yeast mix should have a cap of cream-colored froth on top. If your yeast doesnt do this, either your water was too hot, or your yeast is old and dead.

Measure ingredients in the order listed into a large mixing bowl, making sure to mix thoroughly (I like to run the whole dry batch through a sifter afterward, but this is really not necessary). Add the oil to the eggs. Add the vinegar to the water. Then add these to each other.

Add wet mix to dry mix, stirring well. You can use a dough mixer, but a good, strong arm will do the trick nicely. Lastly, add the yeast mixture, stirring until evenly mixed. Cover bowl loosely with plastic wrap, leaving it in a warm (and preferably, dark) place to rise for 30 minutes.

After first rise, stir dough, beating out most of the air-bubbles. Grease a medium-sized bread pan. Spoon the dough into the pan; then cover and let rise a second time in a warm, dark place for another 30 minutes.

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Bake at 350 degrees for 50-60 minutes. Leave to cool in pan for 10 minutes, then remove from pan to cool on a cooling rack for no less than 15 minutes before slicing (When Im over-eager and slice the bread too soon, it caves in the middle, leaving bread slices that are misshapen).

FOR PIZZA CRUST:

Use basically the same recipe, reducing water in wet mixture to ¾ cup, and using brown rice flour in place of quinoa flour in the dry mixture.

After first rise, spoon dough into the middle of a greased 12 pizza pan. Dust top of dough ball with tapioca starch, so it wont stick to your hands. Dust fingertips as well. Using your fingers, flatten the dough, working to stretch it to the outer edges of the pan. Over a sink, use a turkey baster to puff air across the crust to remove the excess starch from the crusts top (Or, if youre feeling particularly uncouth, you can just blow on it!) Brush crust with olive oil. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and leave pan in a warm dark place to rise for 30 minutes.

Bake crust for 12-15 minutes in a 350 degree oven. Remove from oven. Cover with sauce and toppings. Bake at 350 for 15-20 minutes.

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I'm a naturalist -- I don't use drugs, creams, etc. I do, however, scratch** the rash until I'm almost bleeding and then dump isopropyl alcohol in it -- that relieves the itch for quite some time. (Stings at first though.) I get the rashes on my legs. ANYWAY, I have found that a gluten-free diet is the only (or best) approach -- it's certainly the most natural, in my opinion. It took six months before I felt I was cleansed of gluten. I went nine months (or more) without a rash. Then, I mistakenly ate some soup with barley in it. Got the rash. I let it run its course while getting back to & staying on a gluten-free diet. My best advice is just to stay on a gluten-free diet. Be strong, brave. You can do it! ** I should clarify that when my rashes start itching, I can't help but scratch (excessively). I am not suggesting scratching yourself (with or without cause) as a means to an end. Don't scratch if you can.

Nicotinamide helps a great deal. Nicotinamide is a form of Vitamin B3, also called Niacin. Many new Celiacs have trouble absorbing sufficient vitamins and minerals because of intestinal damage. Malabsorption causes malnutrition. Deficiencies of the B Complex vitamins, especially niacin, and vitamins A and D often manifest as skin rashes and exacerbate DH. Recent research has found that treatment with nicotinamide and tetracycline effectively treats DH. Ask your doctor to check for vitamin deficiencies if you haven't already. Also dapsone use may cause iron, B12, and folate deficiencies which may lead to anemia. These should be monitored as well. Hope this helps.

I'm so excited! The Austin area has a new gluten-free restaurant - Guaco Taco. I'm going there tomorrow night for dinner. I love Mexican food and miss being able to eat it out.

I see the original post, and most replies, are old, but I thought I would weigh in as a vegetarian... for almost 25 years now. I wish you all good health!

Hmmm, interesting. That's a good policy!