No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

New Testing Procedure for Intestinal Permeability

This was posted to the Celiac Listserv by Don Wiss.

Testing for intestinal permeability is a sensitive and accurate way to screen for celiac disease, with fewer false positive and false negative results than other commonly used screens. Intestinal permeability reflects the ability of the intestinal lining to absorb nutrients while keeping undesirable chemical substances out of the body. In patients with celiac disease who are consuming gluten, even small amounts of damage to the intestine will allow certain large chemical molecules to leak into the bloodstream, from which they may be excreted by the kidneys into the urine. The available permeability test requires that the individual drink a solution which contains two sugars, neither of which is metabolized or changed in the body. One sugar is usually mannitol, which is readily absorbed from the intestine and excreted in the urine. The other sugar is lactulose, which is hardly absorbed

Ads by Google:

at all under normal conditions. Any lactulose that is absorbed is excreted unchanged in the urine within 5 to 6 hours. Both sugars are safe to be taken, even by small children. When a person with celiac disease drinks the lactulose/mannitol mixture, an excessive amount of lactulose will appear in the urine, unless the person is on a strict gluten-free diet. If the person has enough celiac disease to create malabsorption, then the mannitol level in urine will be low. The ratio of lactulose to mannitol in urine is the most sensitive index of active celiac disease. An elevated lactulose to mannitol ratio in urine may be due to conditions other than celiac disease, such as intestinal infection, severe food allergy or Crohns disease, but a normal ratio indicates either that the person does not have celiac disease or is in complete remission due to strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. Information about this test can be obtained from the one laboratory that presently offers it, Great Smokies Diagnostic Laboratory in Asheville, NC. Their number is 1-800-522-4762.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Thanks for the information really appreciated

There are some enzymes you can take to lessen the gut symptoms, they help break it down quicker to get over it faster. Your antibodies will still flare up for the next few weeks and weak havoc with your immune system so it is mostly damage control. Go easy on your gut everyone is different in ter...

Hi all: I was diagnosed with Celiac in 2010 with blood testing and small bowel biopsy. I have been following a gluten-free diet since and a lot of my symptoms and skin problems have gotten better. However, I was at the beach and got bitten by flies and after biopsy of my legs and a whole H...

Yeah my family stopped doing gifts a few years ago when we had a grandparent on each side of the family die. After that no one meets up, no gifts, no one even does cards. I tried 2 years ago to give all my relatives gifts, hand written cards......None of them even said thanks. Next year I said I ...

This paper from 2015 suggests the opposite is true: High Proportions of People With Nonceliac Wheat Sensitivity Have Autoimmune Disease or Antinuclear Antibodies. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/26026392/ Of course correlation does not equal causation, but it is compelling an...