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Research Articles on Low Bone Density and Celiac Disease

The following was received on March 5, 1998 from Kathryn K. Harden, Ph.D., k-harden@UIUC.EDU, Assistant Editor, The Journal of Nutrition, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

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The latest issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition contains two articles concerning celiac disease. It is encouraging to see research papers concerning celiac disease in important basic research and clinical journals. The citations are:

  • Reversal of low bone density with a gluten-free diet in children and adolescents with celiac disease. S. Mora, G. Barera, A. Ricotti, G. Weber, C. Bianchi and G. Chiumello. AJCN 67: 477-481, 1998. The authors conclude that in children and adolescents with low bone mineral density (BMD) due to celiac disease, a gluten free diet promotes a rapid increase of BMD that leads to a complete recovery of bone mineralization. Due to the severe consequences of low BMD, the authors emphasize the need for early diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease.
  • Nutritional status of newly diagnosed celiac disease patients before and after the institution of a celiac disease diet - association with the grade of mucosal villous atrophy. T Kemppainen, V-M Kosma, E Janatuinen, R Julkunen, P Pikkarainen, M Uusitupa. AJCN 67: 482-487, 1998. Authors found that celiac disease patients with 3 levels of intestinal villous atrophy (partial, subtotal, total) did not differ in the nutritional status variables measured except erythrocyte folate and serum ferritin concentrations.

The following was received from J.C. Trevett JCTrevett@aol.com on September 28, 1998:

Two articles I would like to add to your list if you dont already have info.

  • Journal of Pediatrics, August 1998 article entitled, Celiac disease: A Reappraisal, by David Branski, MD and Ricardo Troncone, MD. Dr. Branski is Dept. of Pediatrics, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, P. O. Box 3235, Jerusalem, Israel. It is a good five page article referring to the tip of the iceberg again - at least all the experts are in agreement all over the world that we are not diagnosing enough celiac disease. This is a good article - there is some technical stuff about the DB MOLECULE, which I will never understand, but I gave a copy to my gastroenterologist and he seemed to appreciate it.
  • Tufts University, Medford, MA, Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter - September, 1998 - Volume 16, Number 7. Good article for average layperson on Coping with Celiac Disease - mentions CSA/USA, Inc. and its many (80) support groups throughout the country. Also mentions Gluten Intolerance Group, Energy Foods and Dietary Specialties. To quote part of the article: In one survey, 43 percent of those with the condition said that theyd been diagnosed with an assortment of ailments - such as anemia, stress, ulcers, and nerves before finding out that celiac disease was responsible for the symptoms.

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Welcome! At age 13, she should recover easily from Osteopenia on a gluten free diet. It will take time to heal and master the diet, so patience is needed. The great news is that kids tend to heal much faster! Try reading our Newbie 101 thread pinned at the top of the "Coping" section of...

A recent study found people who don't suffer from gluten sensitivity or celiac disease and adopt a gluten-free diet may be unnecessarily reducing ... View the full article

My 13 year old daughter was recently diagnosed with celiac disease through blood work, endoscopy and biopsy. We recently went for a bone density test and we were informed she also has osteopenia. Any advice would be appreciated.

This is stupid. The nuns at Clyde, Missouri make gluten safe hosts. 17 ppm. Well under the 20 ppm threshold. I consume them safely here in Omaha every week.

When I was diagnosed, I told both kids they will have to be tested. They don't know it will be happening sooner rather than later.