No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Gluten-free Diet and Quality of Life in Patients with Screen-detected Celiac Disease

The following Medline abstract describes a unique study that was done on the quality of life of two groups of people with celiac disease: One that was diagnosed as the result of having symptoms, and the other which had little or no symptoms and whose diagnosis was reached via screen-detection. Both groups were treated for one year with a gluten-free diet, and were then studied to determine their overall response, including their psychological response. Here is the abstract:

Eff Clin Pract 2002 May-Jun;5(3):105-13
Mustalahti K, Lohiniemi S, Collin P, Vuolteenaho N, Laippala P, Maki M.
Department of Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, Finland.

CONTEXT: Since the advent of serologic testing for celiac disease, most persons who receive a diagnosis of celiac disease have few or no symptoms. Although pathologic changes of celiac disease resolve on a gluten-free diet, how a gluten-free diet affects the quality of life for patients with screen-detected celiac disease is unclear.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of a gluten-free diet on the quality of life of patients with screen-detected celiac disease.

DESIGN: Prospective study of patients before and 1 year after initiating a gluten-free diet.

Ads by Google:

PARTICIPANTS: 19 patients with screen-detected celiac disease (found by serologically testing first-degree relatives of celiac patients) and 21 consecutive patients with symptom-detected disease. In all cases, celiac diagnosis was confirmed by finding villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia on small-bowel biopsy.

INTERVENTION: Gluten-free diet (explained during a single physician visit). MAIN OUTCOME

MEASURES: Gastrointestinal Symptoms Rating Scale (GSRS), in which scores range from 0 to 6 (higher scores represent worse symptoms); and quality of life measured with the Psychological General Well-Being Questionnaire (PGWB). Scores range from 22 to 132 (higher scores mean greater well-being).

RESULTS: At baseline, patients with symptom-detected celiac disease had poorer quality of life and more gastrointestinal symptoms than those with screen-detected celiac disease. Reported compliance with the gluten-free diet was good. All mucosal lesions of the small bowel had resolved at the follow-up biopsy. After 1 year of following the diet, quality of life for patients with screen-detected disease significantly improved (mean PGWB score increased from 108 to 114; P <0.01). A similar increase was noted in patients with symptom-detected disease (mean PGWB score increased from 92 to 103; P <0.01). Gastrointestinal symptoms also improved in patients with screen-detected disease and in patients with symptom-detected disease (mean GSRS scores decreased from 1.8 to 1.4 and from 2.6 to 1.9, respectively; P <0.01 for both comparisons).

CONCLUSIONS: Gluten-free diet was associated with improved quality of life for patients with symptom-detected celiac disease and patients with screen-detected celiac disease. Concerns about the burden of a gluten-free diet, at least over the short term, may be unfounded.

PMID: 12088289

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


I can not help you with the Candida issues (except to advise reducing sugar from your diet and talk to your doctor about antifungals). I can tell you that my folate and B vitamin levels were off the chart. No, I did not have cancer, which is what you will find if you google). Yes, I have auto...

It could be celiac disease related or not. The fact is her antibodies are still elevated. They have come down dramatically (great job!) and she has had some intestinal healing, but she is not completely healed. She probably needs more time. She is under a lot of stress which is known to affe...

Done and wish you luck. I moved to a full on keto/paleo diet after also. This might be why it does not come back, once you get rid of it probiotics help keep it in check as they eat the yeast.

Ennis_TX Can you please delete the post that you just created as I had my name attached to it and have edited that out of my original post? I unfortunately cannot edit your post. Also, thanks for the candida diet suggestions. I've looked at the link and have gone that route before.

Take it your referring to soy sauce being made with wheat. Yes since it is used almost everywhere eating at a chinese restaurant is almost impossible to avoid CC. the Grill and and most cooked food is off limits. In High end places the sushi is fixed separately and not with soy sauce in the prep....