No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.







Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Dutch Researchers Discover Grain Protein Homology Responsible for Toxicity in Celiacs

Gastroenterology, Oct 2003, Vol 125, No 4, p1105-13

Ads by Google:

Celiac.com 10/30/2003 – It has long been known that celiac disease is caused by T-cell responses to wheat gluten-derived peptides, but the toxicity of other widely consumed grains has not been well studied. The researchers who conducted this study were aimed at determining the toxic T-cell stimulatory properties of barley hordeins, rye secalins, and oat avenins. Except for one instance, they found that there were no identical T-cell stimulatory gluten peptide matches in these grains. There were, however, similar responses found in "11 homologous sequences in hordeins, secalins, and avenins located in regions similar to those in the original gluten proteins," and seven of the 11 peptides were recognized by gluten-specific T-cell lines and/or clones from patients with celiac disease. The team discovered that key amino acids can be substituted, which will either partially or totally stop the T-cell stimulation by the gluten peptides, and that "single nucleotide substitutions in gluten genes will suffice to induce these effects."

The researchers conclude: "These results show that the disease-inducing properties of barley and rye can in part be explained by T-cell cross-reactivity against gluten-, secalin-, and hordein-derived peptides. Moreover, the results provide a first step toward a rational strategy for gluten detoxification via targeted mutagenesis at the genetic level."

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



3 Responses:

 
annie
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
28 May 2008 5:44:06 PM PST
So, for the non-scientist, what does this mean? That rye is ok, for celiacs? That oats are not? That they create the same reaction? This is confusing. It would be good to have a couple lines for the novice in there.

 
Sherry
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
27 Aug 2008 8:02:28 PM PST
I agree with Annie. In addition it sounds like they believe the answer lies in mutating genes (Of the grains?). My thanks to all the companies and individuals who have developed tasty recipes that deal naturally with gluten intolerance.

 
Karen
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
29 Dec 2008 5:45:12 PM PST
I agree with Annie and Sherry! I am 39 now and diagnosed at the age of 2. I have done much reading and research on being celiac to maintain my health. The info given above about new research being done would be wonderful as most celiacs try to stay on top of new info and options......However it sure would be nice as a lay person to understand what has been written. The above seems intriguing but becomes a tease because it is hard to decipher and understand.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Great so they are safe! Good because I bought a bag and jab been suffering with a sore throat so this will definitely soothe it. Thanks!

Hi Louie, Welcome to the forum! It's true, you probably are doing the gluten-free diet wrong. The gluten-free diet is a huge change for many people, and it can take sometime to learn it and how to avoid all the places gluten can hide in foods. Really I consider the first 6 months a be...

No that's a really good point mate. I'll amend my post also. Thanks for pointing it out

Just needed to point this out while it seems the UK and perhaps even Canada they are. The US McDonalds has wheat in the fries. Second thought in the US you have to a take more careful with CC and chains, the kids go in and out of these like crazy and think gluten free is a kind of fad. I would ...

I hope I'll be fine too.