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Torta de Santiago (Spanish Almond Cake - Gluten-Free)

This recipe comes to us from Michele Rice.

Ingredients:
1 cup sugar
¼ teaspoon grated lemon rind or orange rind
2 cups (½ pound) almonds with skins, finely ground. I either process the nuts in small batches in my food processor, or buy almond meal at a health food store (refrigerated section)
7 eggs, separated
¼ teaspoon cinnamon
Chipped or slivered almonds for garnish
Powdered sugar and/or whipped cream for garnish

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Directions:
Cream sugar, lemon rind and egg yolks until the mixture is light and fluffy. Stir in the almonds and cinnamon. This mixture will be very dense. I do all of this in my food processor. With a mixer, beat the egg whites until they are stiff, but not dry. Stir a few tablespoons of the egg white into the almond mixture, and then fold in the rest of the egg whites.

Pour into 2 greased 8 inch layer pans and bake @ 350F for 45 minutes or until the cake is well browned (Actually I use a large Corning ware type quiche pan and just use one layer).

You can remove the cakes from the pans and frost with a ½ pint of whipping cream, ¼ teaspoon sugar, whipped until stiff OR just serve it the traditional way with a sprinkling of powdered sugar on top. In Santiago, a cut-out of a medieval cross (The Cross of Santiago) is placed on the cake, and then the cake is sprinkled with powdered sugar. The cross template is then removed so that you have a brown cross on a field of powdered sugar. Any type of template works well for the design. You can use doilies, or quilting templates found in craft stores.

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http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faqs/ You can also find lots of information on celiac at the University of Chicago celiac site. One test they suggest is the anti EMA antibodies. I don't see that one listed in her results. Probably because it is more expensive to do. So they may have skipped it. The other test they usually do is the total serum IGA levels, which is used to prove that the person's immune system actually makes IgA antibodies. some people don't make IgA antibodies, so the IgA tests are useless in them. It looks to me like she makes IgA though, if this is the serum IgA result. IgA 133 mg/dl Reference range 33-200 There are also gene tests they can do. The genes indicate the possibility of developing celiac disease, not the automatic presence of celiac disease. About 30% of people in the USA have one of the genes for celiac disease, but only about 1% develop celiac disease. Some of the celiac genes are associated with other autoimmune conditions besides celiac disease. So there are lists of AI associated conditions with celiac disease. Sometimes called related conditions. http://www.drschaer-institute.com/us/celiac-disease/associated-conditions-1051.html

Blood was drawn this afternoon... they said I could get results tomorrow or even the next day! I also have a GI appt scheduled for June 9th. I am so glad I will have at least some kind of answer pretty soon. I'll let you all know. Thanks again for being so helpful!

Thank you so much for those links, I will check into it. Her pediatrician told me this afternoon she is wanting to repeat the bloodwork since that one test was elevated. I'm relieved that her pediatrician didn't dismiss it like the other dr in the practice did.

http://www.houstonceliacs.org/ https://www.csaceliacs.org/csa_chapter_25.jsp You can check with these groups to see if they recommend any doctors in Houston.

I have been having issues with gluten for quite some time now and decided to go gluten free back in October, I finally got the celiac blood test a couple weeks ago and it came back inconclusive. My doctor referred me to a gastroenterologist who I saw today, she told me I'd have to eat gluten rich foods for 1 month and then have another blood test done....of it comes back negative she said I'd need to eat gluten another few weeks (up to another month) and then do a scope and biopsy....this would be hell on me as I have severe cramping and nausea when I am exposed to gluten. I haven't actually eaten anything that is straight gluten like bread so I'm not sure what would happen. She gave me the option to hold off and continue my diet or go through 2 months of pure gluten exposure (and pain) my question is has anyone been faced with this? Should I just continue with my gluten free diet and assume I have it or is the diagnosis really that important? Doc says based on my symptoms and reactions I more than likely have it.