No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

No Connection between Celiac Disease and Schizophrenia?

Eur Psychiatry. 2004 Aug;19(5):311-4.

Celiac.com 09/12/2004 - Israeli researchers conducted a study designed to determine whether or not an association exists between celiac disease and schizophrenia. Past studies have indicated that such a connection may exist. The researchers screened 50 consecutive patients over 18 years old who were diagnosed with schizophrenia and their matched controls for celiac-specific anti-endomysial IgA antibodies. All patients also completed a detailed questionnaire. There were no significant differences between the groups in gender, Body Mass Index (BMI) or country of birth, and the mean age of the study group was significantly higher than the controls. All tests for anti-endomysial antibodies in both groups were negative, and the researchers concluded that "In contrast to previous reports, we found no evidence for celiac disease in patients with chronic schizophrenia as manifested by the presence of serum IgA anti-endomysial antibodies. It is unlikely that there is an association between gluten sensitivity and schizophrenia"

Celiac.com Comments on this Study:

This was a relatively small study that did not include other celiac disease screening methods, such as IgG (antigliadin antibody), tTG (tissue Transglutaminase), or intestinal biopsies. A recent study has shown that only 77% of those with total and 33% of those with partial villous atrophy actually have positive blood tests for celiac disease, so many cases of celiac disease may be missed by using only blood tests to screen for it. Further, about 4% of celiacs are anti-endomysial IgA deficient, so anyone in this subclass would have been missed in the study. Given such a small number of people in the study--50--if even one celiac were missed it would greatly affect the outcome of the study. Both groups should have been given much more comprehensive celiac disease screening to ensure that no cases of celiac disease were missed.

Ads by Google:

In the article by Dr. Hadjivassiliou titled Gluten Sensitivity as a Neurological Illness he says:

The introduction of more celiac disease specific serological markers such as anti-endomysium and more recently transglutaminase antibodies may have helped in diagnosing celiac disease but their sensitivity as markers of other manifestations of gluten sensitivity (where the bowel is not affected) is low. This certainly reflects our experience with patients with gluten sensitivity who present with neurological dysfunction. Endomysium and transglutaminase antibodies are only positive in the majority but not in all patients who have an enteropathy. Patients with an enteropathy represent only a third of patients with neurological manifestations and gluten sensitivity. Antigliadin antibodies unlike endomysium and transglutaminase antibodies are not autoantibodies. They are antibodies against the protein responsible for gluten sensitivity.

Only one third of the patients with neurological disorders associated with gluten sensitivity have villous atrophy on duodenal biopsy. Even some with biochemical markers of malabsorption such as low serum vitamin B12, low red cell folate, or vitamin D concentrations had normal conventional duodenal histology. These cases may illustrate the patchy nature of bowel involvement in coeliac disease and the inaccurate interpretation of duodenal biopsies by inexperienced histopathologists. Preliminary data based on staining of the subpopulation of T cells in the small bowel epithelium suggests that these patients have potential celiac disease. There are, however, patients where the immunological disorder is primarily directed at the nervous system with little or no damage to the gut. Our practice is to offer a gluten-free diet to these patients unless the HLA genotype is not consistent with susceptibility to gluten intolerance (that is, other than HLA DQ2, DQ8, or DQ1). All patients are followed up and any clinical response is documented.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



1 Response:

 
Chris
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
30 Dec 2009 6:12:27 AM PDT
You should have done an IgG test instead.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

And this from Consumer Reports: http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2012/11/arsenic-in-your-food/index.htm Rice aside, stop giving your kids apple juice too as it can contain high levels of arsenic too! Eat real apples -- not juice.

If I am in a bar and it is super busy, I ask for a "to go" cup. Why? If a dishwasher is not being used (or demand is overwhelming it), bartenders are cleaning all the glasses the old fashioned way ( sinks, wash and rinse with disinfectant). Good for killing bacteria I suppose, but maybe not for removing gluten traces. No bar is going to slow down drink orders ($$$$$) to wait for clean glasses from the dishwasher! Is this all true? I can not say. I am just speaking from experience when I was barmaid 30 years ago before there were dedicated bar dishwashers. http://www.servicethatsells.com/blog/how-to-clean-a-beer-glass/ Even if this is "all in my head", I feel better clutching my "to go" cup and can relax. ?

Check out this page and the advice on rice prep: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2F1MDzyW55pg97Tdpp7gqLN/should-i-be-concerned-about-arsenic-in-my-rice

Hi Rachel and welcome I think you've found the single best site on the web for help and advice. Hope it's of use to you. I tested negative for celiac so no referral. My experience with NHS however suggests it could be worth phoning your Gastro's office and asking the admin staff there to check on this. Things get overlooked... I would avoid anything with those warnings on. It's a pain in the arse because, for example, it recently appeared on a brand of nuts I like. However having some experience of production and marketing environments that warning will only be going on the pack if someone in the company thinks there's a chance of contamination. There's always other products to choose from so I don't take the chance. Walkers crisps have given me a reaction, yes even the sodding ready salted ones It's something to do with their production processes. I think Gary Lineker may dance through the factory each week spreading handfuls of flour for good luck. Whatever, I now avoid them. My energy levels improved over a few months after the diet. It took longer the second time after my challenge. I was still noticing improvements / weird resolutions of odd symptoms up to 9 months to a year later... Lots of good advice here: All the best! Matt

Ah.... Settles back, dons funny hat, smokes pipe, plays violin, injects heroin etc... I think you need to treat yourself as your own science experiment. If you're ok at home with all of the drinks then you can almost certainly rule out alcohol intolerance and thank your bodies burgeoning super coeliac powers of gluten detection for the reaction. Clearly your powers have grown in the past five years young jedi... In which case maybe there's a drink you can order which would reduce this risk, maybe asking for the bottle and a clean glass, forgoing ice, straws etc, anything to simplify matters and reduce the number of contaminant variables. One thing I'd avoid would be 'mixers' from the shared line. Not because there's gluten filled drinks going through them, typically its just coke, lemonade and soda water, but because the nozzle sometimes dips into the drink that's being filled. Paranoid? Maybe, but I avoid them now and pay the extra for a bottle. A word on glasses. Most bars have a dedicated glass washer and they're good, to a point. I've worked behind a bar in the past and the washers are only on for a very short time, they can run up to 35 times an hour... I've seen lipstick on glasses from them and whilst the chances of contamination are probably slight... Now if you're out for a night at different places, it will be very hard to work out where its happening. So my suggestion is to go out to one bar only and pick a decent one. Speak to a bartender or manager, explain to them just what a special snowflake you are and get one definitely clean glass at the outset then keep it for the evening and just get it refilled. Pick one drink only and stick to it. I'd suggest wine as maybe its easier on the stomach than the bubbly prosecco and you can get the little bottles without any chance of contamination but that may be nonsense See what happens... If you're ok, then you have an answer. You've become more sensitive and your reacting to trace gluten. *removes funny hat, discards pipe, hides syringe...