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Intestinal Permeability in Patients with Celiac Disease on a Gluten-free Diet

Dig Dis Sci. 2005 Apr;50(4):785-90.

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Celiac.com 05/09/2005 – To determine the effect a long-term gluten-free diet has on intestinal permeability in those with celiac disease, Canadian researchers divided celiac disease patients into three groups based on the length of time on a gluten-free diet: Group A less than 1 month; Group B, 1 month-1 year; Group C more than 1 year. Groups B and C were tested three times over the course of 12 weeks for lactulose/mannitol intestinal permeability, endomysial antibody, and 3-day food record. These results were compared to that of Group A and control subjects. The researchers found that intestinal permeability was elevated in those newly diagnosed with celiac disease and in those who were on a gluten-free diet for less than one year. They also found that it increased in those on a gluten-free diet for more than one year in those whose diets were contaminated with gluten. The researchers conclude that intestinal permeability normalizes in most people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet, and gluten ingestion as determined by a 3 day food record correlates with intestinal permeability measurements. Further studies need to be done on the role of intestinal permeability testing in the follow-up care of those with celiac disease.

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1 Response:

 
Gloria Brown
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said this on
02 Nov 2007 3:11:32 PM PST
The study did not include intestinal permeability findings for longterm celiacs.

Even on what one would hope is a strict gluten-free diet, as celiacs age I have reason to suspect injury to the intestine from the minutest of gluten--from ingestion to exposure to non-celiacs--contributes to intestinal permeability and increased malabsorption.




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Thank you i have the colonoscopy on Tuesday and am dreading the prep more than anything lol. I think what ever the outcome I will try a gluten free diet to see if it helps with the symptoms. I've read so many stories of people going gluten free and symptoms such as depression, anxiety...

A positive on any one celiac test should lead to an endoscopy/biopsies being done by a gastroenterologist. You should keep eating gluten until the endoscopy is done.

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