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Eating Gluten–Free is on the Rise

Dr. Peter Green and the Celiac Disease Center (CDC) at Columbia University is the only center in the US providing comprehensive medical care and nutritional consulting for adults and pediatrics with celiac disease. The cure: a gluten free diet. The CDC diagnoses and treats over 2000 patients annually. Children’s author Tina Turbin has been eating gluten free for about nine years, and has been actively researching, writing and promoting the need for increased awareness of celiac disease as well as gluten intolerance and gluten sensitivity.

Elisabeth Hasselbeck has released her book The G Free Diet after her many years of trial and error with her body in her attempt to feel well. Dr. Peter Green helped put her search to an end. She too had celiac disease.

So why is gluten free food popping up in stores everywhere?  Why are people requesting gluten free dishes at their local restaurants?  These days you will find gluten free products in your stores and will be served a gluten free meal by a well informed chef.

Celiac disease affects approximately one out of every 100 individuals – (1%) in the USA. Often people are treated for an autoimmune condition before
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ever being diagnosed with celiac disease.

Celiac disease is vastly different than gluten sensitivity or gluten intolerance. It is not clear how common the latter is but it is known that gluten sensitivity has no immediate effects like celiac and does not damage the villi in the small intestines, as celiac disease does, yet it can cause GI disturbances.

There are specific tests needed to determine if you are celiac or gluten sensitive. If one tests positive for either, a gluten free diet will be required to assist one for improved health. Now we have gene testing to help determine genetic predisposition as well.

I have gone to great lengths to ensure that others are well informed on how to go about getting tested, where to go for help, recipes, and additional resources – see my bio for more info about me.

As a children’s author, researcher and through numerous radio interviews, I hope to help raise awareness of these broad issues: gluten free food, celiac disease and gluten free sensitivity.

As always, Celiac.com welcomes your comments (see below).


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Just opened in Cincinnati, Oh: Ma and Pa's Gluten Free Cafe. Dedicated gluten-free restaurant. I had the pizza hoagie and onion rings last night. I forgot just how oily onion rings were. They sat in my stomach like concrete all night long but tasted great. Next time I'm getting the pizza or pulle...

Nope, had the flu and this has happened before when I ate the chili. JMG, I read the deadspin article. It's pretty funny. First, at least we're not bull testicles(Montana), and second, Skyline is the only one claiming to be gluten-free besides Hormel(sucks) and Amy's(sucks) that is Cincinnati sty...

....post is 12 years old, please check the dates, On a side note to this topic, I had no gluten issues with tide but it caused itching for other reasons I went with Rockin Green and Mollys Suds for a natural detergent years ago. You get like 70-90loads from a bag try, Amazon, Luckyvitamin, or Thr...

Really interesting point Kareng. In fact, my ttg went up this autumn (November), depressingly, and I saw a nutritionalist earlier this month and she doesn't want to retest til March. She felt it was too soon for those figures, too.

There was a study where they checked 2 weeks on a gluten-free diet , and antibodies were still going up . The study wasn't about that, so I think that is why they didn't go any further. So... looks like 2 months gluten free? If we think that antibodies are still being made at least two w...