No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.




Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter






Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

The Gluten Free Give Back: Food Banks

We’ve all heard of Oprah’s Big Give show from a few years ago. I am suggesting during this Celiac Disease Awareness Month to do a “Gluten Free Give Back”, as we take time to give back to this disease that has changed our lives so significantly.

During this month I plan to do occasional postings on how we can give back to the gluten free community.  This post is looking at food banks.

We all are likely VERY possessive of our gluten free food– it’s so expensive why would we just GIVE it to someone? I’ll be honest, that is one of my initial reactions, but it turns out in this bad economy there is a need for gluten-free food at your local food bank.

Needing Gluten Free Food at the Food Bank

Last week I set out to learn more about the need in my own community in Minnesota. I talked with Lisa Aune of Second Harvest Heartland and she said,

“We do occasionally receive requests from some of our food shelf partners about the availability of gluten free food for clients of theirs.” Can you imagine being caught in a place where you need to use the food shelf and you can’t even find food options that you can eat?

The gluten-free need has been noticed elsewhere too.  In Massachusetts Pierce’s Pantry is a food shelf specifically for gluten free needs. You can find out how to donate or receive food at this helpful website.

Back in 2009 in Loveland, Colorado, they opened the country’s first gluten free food bank at the House of Neighborly Services. Organizer Dee Valdez of  GlutenFreeDee.com told Tricia Thompson of GlutenFreeDietitian.com what prompted her to take action.

Ads by Google:

“I remember talking to a mother who had a sick 7 year old who had Celiac Disease. The exasperated mom said she had to choose between feeding her whole family or just feeding her sick daughter the very expensive gluten free food she could find. The distraught mother said, referring to her celiac daughter, “She’s just going to have to live with diarrhea.” — Dee Valdez, Gluten Free Food Bank Organizer and Gluten Free Advocate. Interview on www.glutenfreedietitian.com

That really is a heartbreaking story, but it lead to fabulous work by Valdez.  She also played a role in the new Gluten Free Food Pantry for low-income celiacs in Pittsburgh.  The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness profiled the food bank opening on its website recently.  It just opened this spring.

How Can You Get Active?

So what if there is nothing like any of the aforementioned food banks in your area?  Teri Gruss had some ideas in her about.com article. She recommends talking to your local food shelf and asking them to put a call out for gluten-free donations.  But you could also organize a food drive in your community or with your support group.

Back in Minnesota with my contact at Second Harvest Heartland, she supported the idea of donating gluten-free food,

“…I would suggest that you ask your readers to make those donations to their local food shelf. That way they are keeping the donations in their own community, and I’m sure the food shelves would be thrilled to get it.”  Lisa Aune of Second Harvest Heartland

Nadine Grzeskowiak, RN CEN of GlutenFreeRN.com had a great suggestion, to donate gluten free food to the Stamp Out Hunger food drive that happens on May 14th.  She says, “…put non-perishable GLUTEN FREE food in a bag in your mailbox and your local mail carrier will pick it up and take it to the local food banks.”

I will be donating gluten free food to my area food bank soon and I will let you know how it goes!

As always, Celiac.com welcomes your comments (see below).


Spread The Word







4 Responses:

 
Georgianna

said this on
07 May 2011 8:53:50 AM PDT
Amy, this is a great idea! As a social work student I often wonder what it would like to be facing hunger and poverty with no where to turn. I am glad that I am not the only one with this in mind!

 
Tangie

said this on
28 Mar 2012 3:59:47 PM PDT
This article is especially touchy for me...I am a single mother of 3 gorgeous girls. My baby is celiac and l have been faced with the decisions of "buy for the baby" or "buy for everyone else". No one can possibly know the heartbreak of having to make that decision. I have had to use the food bank and unfortunately for someone facing no money for a month and only receiving enough food for a few days, the frustration and desperation is compounded when in those few days of food there is nothing my baby can eat because it has almost all gluten containing foods. I am working hard to get to a better place to be able to support and care for my family, but what do l do in the meantime? Gluten free food donations would be a huge help to those who are in need.

 
Dee Valdez

said this on
21 Jun 2012 11:59:58 AM PDT
Tangie, when you have such an urgent need, I'd suggest going to a local church and telling them of the situation. Ask if anyone in their church could "adopt" your family to assisting in feeding you for 3 months. Perhaps you could even attend a M.O.P.S. (Mother's of Preschoolers) group to ask for help there. If you are still needing help, please let me know.

 
Dee Valdez

said this on
21 Jun 2012 12:00:47 PM PDT
Well done article Amy! Great information and suggestions!




Leave a reply:
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Thank you all for replying. It's good to know that it's not just me. It gives me (and hopefully the other noobs) some comfort to know that it's normal for the ups and downs to happen. I keep trying to tell myself to be patient with it but it's so hard to be able to look down the road further than...

Thank you for your reply. I did make sure to keep eating gluten before getting tested. I'm still unsure whether or not I should ask my doctor to run the rest of the tests in the celiac panel.

LOL, re: trousers vs. pants. Here in the US, trousers are a specific kind of pants/slacks, with a looser fit and often with pleats in the front. I also read that Vit D helps digestion; can't recall the links, but likely within Gundry's writings about lectin. My Dr. just told me to res...

I'd try the gluten free diet for a few months to see if that helps at all. Can't hurt. If it doesn't help I'd try a low FODMAP meat and veggies diet.

A good amount of the neurological effects from celiac are also related to nutrient deficiencies caused by malabsorbtion from damaged intestines and the fact that most gluten-free foods are not fortified and your net eating many grains. You sound good about the CC and everything and seem to be tak...