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California Firm Recalls Meatball Products due to Misbranding and an Undeclared Wheat

Kim Son Food Co., an Oakland, Calif., establishment is recalling approximately 84,000 pounds of cooked beef and pork meatball products because of misbranding and an undeclared allergen. The products contain a known allergen, wheat, which is not declared on the label.

The products subject to recall include:
  • 12-oz. and 5-lb packages of “KIM SO’N COOKED BEEF MEAT BALLS WITH CHICKEN & ANCHOVY FLAVORED FISH SAUCE ADDED”
  •  12-oz. and 5-lb packages of “KIM SO’N COOKED PORK MEAT BALLS ANCHOVY FLAVORED FISH SAUCE ADDED”
  • 12-oz. and 5-lb packages of “KIM SO’N COOKED BEEF & TENDON MEAT BALLS WITH CHICKEN & ANCHOVY FLAVORED FISH SAUCE ADDED.”
Each package bears the establishment number “EST. 18862” inside the USDA mark of inspection, and also bears a sticker with the package code 34311-16012.

The products were produced on December 9, 2010 through June 9, 2011, and shipped to retail establishments, including restaurants, in California’s San Francisco Bay as well as Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, and Washington.

The problem was discovered by FSIS inspection personnel
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during a routine label review and occurred because of a change in ingredients as a result of the establishment changing suppliers. FSIS and the company have received no reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks (including at restaurants) to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumers and media with questions about the recall should contact Joanna Hua, Kim Son Food Co. Manager, at (510) 535-6888.

Consumers with food safety questions can "Ask Karen," the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day.

Source:
http://origin-www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/Recall_041_2011_Release/index.asp

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