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So Unfair

Our lives revolve around food. The selection of ingredients, the preparation, the clean up, these activities take up a large portion of our everyday lives. Our very survival depends on our food intake. For those of us with food allergies, thoughts of food become almost compulsive.

We can't eat this, can't eat that, can't eat there! See this, want that, can't have it. So we obsess and plan and hoard our gluten free products with rabid looks in our eyes.

Luckily, we live in a world where, for most of us food is plentiful. Imagine what it was like before restaurants, before ovens, before microwaves, refrigerators, even ice! Imagine what it is still like for those who don't have money for food, or a home to eat it in. When put in that context, our challenges become easier to swallow, pun intended.

We don't have to dress warmly in order to endure the bitter cold, as we try to hunt and gather to feed our families, unless you count the subzero temperatures of the grocery store, which sometimes I do! It's cold in there!

In looking for inspiration for this blog, I stumbled across a fabulous site that has a food timeline, telling us when certain food items came into the world. Here it is ----> www.foodtimeline.org. On that site I happened to see fried coca cola. Yes, fried coke! How I ask you? I know we live in a day of decadence, we really do. I have heard of fried twinkies,
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oreos, pickles, etc. None of which we glutenators can have, which can only be a blessing as we may as well stuff it in an artery as to eat it!

But, fried coke? How do they do this? And why do I want it so bad? It must be gross, it HAS to be, and yet, I want it! I will call it my precious, and my precious it shall be!  How would they do this? Inject the cola into a fried dough ball perhaps? I had to look, and because of my insatiable curiousity, I felt the need to share what I found with you. Here ---> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/fried_coke

I am convinced this delicacy must be scrumptious. It was sent to temp me into insensibility until I succumb to it's wiles! I will stand firm!  I will remind myself of the poor cavemen and so forth I mentioned above. Hunter and gatherers, yep, that's what I will think of instead of the wonders of fried, doughy, devil sent tantalizations.

Why do we as a nation feel the need to fry everything? I have never been a  fanatic of the fricasee, but I do love fried zucchini, and those green beans they fry up and serve with wasabi sauce? OH the unfairness! I tried to make fried zucchini at home using rice flour, and it smelled like baby formula. Not appetizing at all. I WILL figure it out though, and when I do I will share it with you.

Be strong fellow glutenators, we CAN do this! We WILL do this, and we will do it well! We are tough!


As always, Celiac.com welcomes your comments (see below).


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1 Response:

 
Susan Bishop

said this on
29 Aug 2011 4:52:01 PM PDT
Try cornmeal with your zucchini and spice it up a little with black pepper. My finance used cornmeal to fry summer squash, and it came out fairly well, with no baby formula smell!




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