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Mediterra S.A. Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Wheat in Mastihashop Brand Pies, Pasta, and Spreads

MEDITERRA S.A. of Chios Greece is recalling PIE WITH CHIOS MASTIHA 80g, HONEY PIE WITH ALMONDS 80g, HALVA PIE WITH CHIOS MASTIHA AND PEANUTS 80g, FIGS STUFFED WITH ALMONDS 360g , GREEK GARLIC SPREAD WITH ALMONDS 180g, HANDMADE TRAHANA PASTA WITH MASTIHA 340g, SMOKED EGGPLANT SPREAD WITH CHIOS MASTIHA 180g, and SPICY GARLIC SPREAD WITH CHIOS MASTIHA 180g, because they may contain undeclared allergens.

Specifically mastiha pie, honey pie and halva pie contain egg albumin, wheat flour and nuts (almonds). The handmade Τraxana contains milk yogurt and wheat gluten. The figs contain nuts (almonds). The Greek garlic spread contains nuts (almonds) and wheat bread. The smoked eggplant contains nuts (pine nuts). The spicy garlic spread with mastiha contains wheat bread. People who have allergies to egg, milk, wheat, and/or nuts run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.

These products have been sold in the United States via internet sales through www.mastihashopny.com  and from one retail store located at 145 Orchard St., New York, New York.

The mastiha pie, halva pie and honey pie are packaged in a plastic bag and wrapped in paper as secondary packaging. Mastiha pie is marked with LOT09120202 and best before end 12/30/2012. Honey pie is marked with LOT27111107 and best before end 06/30/2012. Halva pie is marked with LOT85111104 and best before end 06/25/2012.

The figs with almonds and handmade trahana are packaged in a plastic vacuum bag and a paper box as secondary packaging. Figs are marked
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with LOT16111115 and best before end 04/30/2012. The handmade trahana pasta is marked with LOT03101125 and best before end 04/30/2012.

The Greek garlic spread, smoked eggplant spread, and spicy garlic spread are packaged in a glass jar with a black lid. Greek garlic spread is marked with LOT03110916 and best before end 09/30/2012. Smoked eggplant is marked with LOT3111020 and best before end 04/30/2013. Spicy garlic spread is marked with LOT01110916 and best before end 09/30/2012.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem.

The recall was initiated after it was discovered that the allergen-containing products were distributed in packaging that did not reveal the presence of the allergens. Specifically we did not declare that albumin is egg albumin, yogurt is milk yogurt, white bread is wheat bread, as well as almonds and pine nuts are nuts.

MEDITERRA S.A. has printed and sent corrected labels for these products on 04/05/2012 and all products now properly declare all ingredients, including any allergens.

Consumers who have purchased any of these products are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the U.S. retail store at 212-253-0895 between 12:00pm and 7:00pm Eastern Time, Tuesday through Sunday or the manufacturer directly at 0030-22710-51805.

Consumers may visit our website at www.mastihashop.com  for more information about Mediterra S.A.

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The reason they set the limit at 20ppms is that through scientific study, they have proven that the vast majority of people with Celiac Disease do not have an autoimmune reaction to amounts below that......it is a safe limit for most. Also, just because that limit is set at 20ppms, does not mean that gluten-free products contain that amount of gluten. Testing for lower levels becomes more expensive with each increment down closer to 0-5ppms, which translates into higher priced products. Unless you eat a lot of processed gluten-free food, which can have a cumulative affect for some, most people do well with the 20ppm limit.

I'm in the Houston area so I'm assuming there are plenty of specialists around, though finding one that accepts my insurance might be hard. This might sound dumb, but do I search for a celiac specialist?? I'm so new to this and want to feel confident in what is/isn't wrong with my daughter. I'm with you on trusting the specialist to know the current research.

Hi VB Thats sounds like a good plan. Would it help to know that a frustrating experience in seeking diagnosis isn't unusual With your IGG result I'm sure a part of you is still wondering if they are right to exclude celiac. I know just how you feel as I too had a negative biopsy, but by then a gluten challenge had already established how severely it affected me. So I was convinced I would be found to be celiac and in a funny way disappointed not to get the 'official' stamp of approval. Testing isnt perfect, you've already learned of the incomplete celiac tests offered by some organisations and the biopsy itself can only see so much. If you react positively to the gluten free diet it may mean you're celiac but not yet showing damage in a place they've checked, or it may be that you're non celiac gluten sensitive, which is a label that for a different but perhaps related condition which has only recently been recognised and for which research is still very much underway. We may not be able to say which but the good news is all of your symptoms: were also mine and they all resolved with the gluten free diet. So don't despair, you may still have found your answer, it just may be a bit wordier than celiac! Keep a journal when you're on the diet, it may help you track down your own answers. Best of luck!

Run to the nearest celiac disease specialty center if you can. Especially with conflicting doc opinions. Where do you live? Honestly, I test positive to only the DGP and the newest research on its specificity is a mixed bag. My recent scope did not show "active" celiac disease but only a slight increase in IELs. I am waiting for my post biopsy appointment with the Celiac specialist next month. But I've been through a couple of GI'S locally and honestly I feel it was definitely worth going to a specialist. Especially when you have some positive blood work but a normal biopsy the doctors really go back and Forth on diagnosis and never really know for certain. Unfortunately given the above I just said I probably still do not know for certain. Sigh. But I trust the specialist to be at the top of his game on the research and at least I can feel confident and comfortable in what his opinion may be next month.

That's a great list with such great info! Do you eat at Shucks?