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Laundry List - "Hold the Starch"

It's been eight years since I have had Arrowroot, buckwheat, corn/maize, potato flour, rice, rice bran, rice flour, sago, tapioca, soy, soy bran, or soy flour.

All are gluten free!  Yet, all are prohibited on the diet I have been following for celiac disease management, since December 2000, the Specific Carbohydrate Diet.

Why? Because they may be gluten- free but they contain starch.

Digestion of starch is effected by hydrolyzing enzymes in a complex process which depends on many factors; these include the botanical origin of starch, whether the starch is amorphous or crystalline, the source of enzymes, substrate and enzyme concentration, temperature and time, as well as the presence of other substances in the multicomponent matrix in which starch occurs naturally.

In 1951, Dr. Sydney Valentine Haas, and his son, Dr Merrill P Haas, published The Management of Celiac Disease. It remains one if the most comprehensive medical texts ever written on celiac disease

Less than a year following  launch of the book, a lone report was published in the English medical journal Lancet.  After testing only ten children, a group consisting of six faculty members of the Departments of Pharmacology, Pediatrics and Child Health at the University of Birmingham, concluded it was not the starch (carbohydrate) in the grains that so many had reported as being deleterious, but the protein gluten in wheat and rye flour that was causing celiac symptoms.

Based on this limited study, they contradicted all previous work by stating that there was no need to restrict carbohydrates. This opened the floodgates to a vast choice of food as long as wheat and rye gluten were absent.  They further advised that, "a high caloric diet may be given throughout with biscuits made from corn-flour, soy flour, or wheat starch instead of wheat flour."

Although, many patients showed remarkable clinical improvement  after following a "gluten-free" diet,  microscopic
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examination of tissues or liquids from the living body to determine the existence or cause of a disease.'); return false">biopsy samples unearthed intestinal cells that were still definitely abnormal. There were some patients who started eating gluten with no ill effects at one time but became extremely ill at other times.

Further observation revealed how Celiac patients  could be inconsistent in their response to a gluten-free diet; the same patient could vary from time to time. Following a relapse, the patient was most often suspected of having inadvertently consumed gluten. Indeed, many patients were unclear about what constitutes "gluten" and  assumed that anything  that begins with "glut" must be gluten. (glutamic acid, glutamine, monosodium glutamate, etc.) or that gluten had been hidden in the food in spite of the fact that it did not appear on the label  (2% of ingredients do not have to be included on labels under Federal law).

It was seen that grains which contained proteins other than gluten were having deleterious effects on the digestive tract. Selected patients suffered relapses and microscopic surveillance exhibited damaged intestinal cells following ingestion of soy products. Oats and barley were seen to contain gluten-like proteins which aggravated symptoms in many celiac sufferers. Rice and other grains were indicated in additional reports as being harmful to intestinal cells.

Anecdotal documentation among 3,000 parents subscribed to Pecanbread, the support list for the autism community using the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, indicate about 80% of list members transitioned from the gluten-free casein-free diet to the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. Many have done better as a result of the change.

There are other restrictions on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet that differ from what is permitted on the gluten-free casein-free diet. In addition to the products I listed at the start.  In looking down all the lists of what the latter permits, I found many items I never even used on the Standard American Diet prior to requiring any restrictions .

Although I never have tried the gluten-free casein-free diet, I found the Specific Carbohydrate Diet very workable because so few additives are allowed in permitted foods.

It took me some time to realize the differences between starch and gluten. Both are considered harmful by Specific Carbohydrate Diet advocates ------ which is why my nutritional laundry list specifies:

"Hold the starch please."

As always, Celiac.com welcomes your comments (see below).


Spread The Word







6 Responses:

 
said this on
21 Jan 2008 10:00:02 AM PDT
Great information. I was so confused.

 
Elaine Hermle

said this on
27 Jan 2008 11:17:57 AM PDT
Very interesting article.

 
Kathleen Ayers

said this on
18 Jan 2009 12:17:18 PM PDT
This is interesting, as I have recently realized that I can't eat rice either. I'm wondering if there are any grains I can have. I will look into this specific carb diet. Thanks for the information!

 
Jenni

said this on
10 Sep 2011 6:55:24 PM PDT
Awesome article and of course now in the past year they have discovered 'cross reactive' where the body can read certain foods as gluten. Foods such as coffee, rice, corn, tapioca, casein and much more (and most of them are starches).

 
marni

said this on
19 Nov 2011 6:51:25 PM PDT
It makes sense but I'm new at this so for me it is hard enough just to learn to eat gluten free. I don't even know if I'm going to have to go casein-free too, so to give up the rice, tapioca, corn and coffee now would make me feel like there is nothing else left to eat.

 
Peggy Cyprowski

said this on
28 May 2012 9:03:01 AM PDT
Consider: guar gum, xanthan gum. There is a third: whey.
Avoid MSG, GMO-altered corn as well as grains. Coffee may be cross-contaminated.
Don't give up. Sugar is a deadly substance.




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Hi! Um, please forgive my quirky sense of humor..... Celiac Disease is genetic... All first degree relatives of people diagnosed with Celiac Disease should be tested for the disease, too. Gall bladder problems are often associated with Celiac Disease. Your diagnosis might save your whole family from further medical problems as they age and the disease progresses... You need to set a good example if relatives are similarly diagnosed.... and then everybody will have to eat gluten free at family gatherings....

That's what I thought! My father has gluten sensitivity and I almost regret telling the doctor that because I feel that made her jump to conclusions because of that. He never had the biopsy either. I feel like doctors think it's just easier to say it's celiac when they show a gluten sensitivity to avoid additional testing, even if that diagnosis doesn't make any sense at all. My doctor didn't even offer the biopsy, and said the blood work was enough. Should I seek a third opinion? I mean, I've been gluten free for 9 months...

It will prolong your life....celiac is a autoimmune disease that causes your own immune system to attack you. The longer your eating gluten the worse it gets, I mean all kinds of other autoimmune disease, food allergies, food intolances. One day you could lose the ablity to eat carbs, or sugars, or become randomly allergic to tomatoes or corn all cause you decided not to be on road to healing I am not kidding here. I am allergic to corn, can not process meats, have another autoimmune disease that makes it so I can not eat dairy or CARBS/SUGARS. I wish I could go back in time and go on a gluten-free diet a decade ago. Worse that could happen you could develop cancer or other complications and yes we have had this happen to a member before on our forums. Think of it like this your just changing brand here I will give you some links to some gluten-free foods, and how to order them, You can even order alot of them online this should help simplify it for you. I suggest thrive, amazon, or one of hte other links from there, Many you can order from the manufacture. https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/117090-gluten-free-food-alternatives-list/

I know this is not funny for you guys, but I had to laugh about how all of those family members simply ignored your well meant advice. That is definitely head in the sand syndrome. I have tried for a long time to find the connection between autoimmune diseases and my health. With this celiac diagnosis I have finally found it. All of the puzzle pieces are in place for sure and it is going to be my mission to do the best possible in order to get healthy again. What a sneaky disease this is and to think that none of my family members never were diagnosed, despite the fact that both have been in doctor's care all of their lives. It really goes to show that most medical doctors simply seem to completely disconnect nutrition with health. I am scared to give that advice to people when I see them suffering from specific diseases. But there are people that I would like to help if I can. Scared to make those suggestions, because so many times negative reactions follow and all I meant to do was to help that person.

There are definitely things you can do to make it easier on yourself. But all of my ideas seem to cost money and involve cooking. But I'll give it a shot anyway in case you haven't already thought of it. I would buy a small chest freezer and put gluten-free foods in it. Canyon bakehouse sells their fantastic bread and bagels right on their website. You can just buy a case of it. Then if you ever get in the mood for a sandwich or bagel the bread's right there frozen in your chest freezer. If you get invited to somebody's house for dinner find out what their cooking and make your own similar version of it. So for Easter I would make ham, potatoes and broccoli and bring that with me. So when everybody else is eating a fantastic Easter dinner I'm also eating a fantastic Easter dinner. I have other food issues and before celiac I was invited to a friend's wedding. I wasn't going to be able to eat the food they were serving so I made similar food at home. They were serving lamb, ham, vegetables, potatoes. So I brought ham, corn and potatoes with me and heated it up when everybody was going to the buffet to get their food. So when everybody else was pigging out on this great wedding dinner I was also pigging out on a great dinner. And nobody would have noticed if they didn't try. Sometimes you just get in the mood to have a frozen dinner and just don't feel like cooking something. There's two ways you can go about this. I happen to be addicted to Udi's chicken Florentine and think that their broccoli kale lasagna is very good as well. So I'd stock up on that in that chest freezer. glutenfreemall.com has tons of stuff. On Sunday you can make a weeks worth of food and freeze a lot of it in individual portions. After a few weeks you will have several different meals in the chest freezer that you made at home. You can eat those on weeknights when you're too busy to cook. In my family Friday night was always eat out fast food night. McDonald's, Burger King, pizza, fried chicken. So for pizza my plan is to purchase Etalia New York style pizza crusts. Purchase some Escalon six in one crushed tomatoes and freeze in individual portions. Buy some Grande 50/50 mozzarella cheese and freeze in individual portions as well. If on Friday night if I am in the mood for pizza I'll just grab a crust, a portion of sauce and a portion of cheese from the chest freezer and make myself pizza in under 15 minutes. When I get invited to a barbecue I bring loaded potato skins or batter fried chicken wings. Everybody loves them as do I. I by Pamela's gluten-free flour from Amazon six at a time. So I always have some available. For the record, at the moment I am an extremely strict diet and cannot do any of the above. But will go back to that method in a few months.