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University of Tampere Awarded a Leading German Scientist with its International Celiac Disease Prize

Professor Detlef Schuppan is the first recipient of the international celiac disease prize awarded by the University of Tampere in Finland. The Maki Celiac Disease Tampere Prize was awarded on Friday 17 April in an event to celebrate the farewell lecture of Professor Markku Mäki.

Photo: Gutenberg University in Mainz, GermanyProfessor Schuppan is a leading German scientist in medicine and gastroenterology who is well known for his research into celiac disease but who has also researched the molecular and cellular biology of chronic liver diseases and fibrosis. His more recent research also includes food intolerances.

In 1997, Schuppan and his research team were able to identify tissue transglutaminase as the autoantigen in the gluten-triggered celiac disease. That discovery took the research on celiac disease to an entirely new level.

Professor Schuppan is the Director of the Institute of Translational Immunology and the Celiac and Small Intestinal Disease Center at Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany. He also works as a professor and senior researcher at Harvard Medical School. Schuppan’s research publications have been cited for more than 18,000 times.

In the event where the prize was awarded, Schuppan gave a talk on celiac disease and related wheat sensitivities reactions, the mechanisms that cause the disease and how the body’s autoimmune system turns against its own tissue transglutaminase. Schuppan is developing a new treatment method based on the inhibition of tissue transglutaminase.

“We wanted to award Professor Schuppan because his scientific breakthrough in 1997, which identified tissue transglutaminase, is one of the three most important milestones in the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease. The other two are the discoveries of gluten and the HLA tissue type,” Professor Markku Mäki says.

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The name of the prize is an abbreviation of “Multiple Approach as Key In celiac disease”. The University of Tampere established the prize to honour Markku Mäki, professor of paediatrics, now emeritus researcher at the university.

International experts were asked to propose suitable candidates for the prize, which was now awarded for the first time. The University of Tampere decided on the recipient of the prize after hearing the experts.

The prize is EUR 15,000 and it will be awarded every other year.

The next awardees will be selected on the basis of an open competition by a panel that consists of a representative of the University of Tampere, the first awardee, Professor Markku Mäki, and other experts, including the executive director of the Finnish Coeliac Society.

The prize will be awarded in an international symposium on celiac disease that will be started in Tampere and organised in cooperation by the University of Tampere, researchers of celiac disease, the Finnish Coeliac Society and Tampere Hall.

For more information, please contact:
Professor Markku Mäki, tel. +358 50 365 6668, markku.maki@uta.fi

As always, Celiac.com welcomes your comments (see below).


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1 Response:

 
Diana Tinman

said this on
10 Jun 2015 8:42:12 AM PDT
I am a patient, interested in this isue




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@cyclinglady thanks for checking in Restricted diet didn't do much. Still had some VA last time they checked. Heath still otherwise fine, so RCD remains unlikely. My sxs kick in lockstep with life stress, so that kind of points to some general IBS stuff on top of celiac disease. Very doubtful I'm getting any gluten in, but fingers crossed my system is just a little hyper-vigilant, as I ponder on this thread.

I have always noticed that the table wine in Europe is pretty damn good! I am a wine lover and so is my husband but he does like his Green's beer.

The reason they set the limit at 20ppms is that through scientific study, they have proven that the vast majority of people with Celiac Disease do not have an autoimmune reaction to amounts below that......it is a safe limit for most. Also, just because that limit is set at 20ppms, does not mean that gluten-free products contain that amount of gluten. Testing for lower levels becomes more expensive with each increment down closer to 0-5ppms, which translates into higher priced products. Unless you eat a lot of processed gluten-free food, which can have a cumulative affect for some, most people do well with the 20ppm limit.

I'm in the Houston area so I'm assuming there are plenty of specialists around, though finding one that accepts my insurance might be hard. This might sound dumb, but do I search for a celiac specialist?? I'm so new to this and want to feel confident in what is/isn't wrong with my daughter. I'm with you on trusting the specialist to know the current research.

Hi VB Thats sounds like a good plan. Would it help to know that a frustrating experience in seeking diagnosis isn't unusual With your IGG result I'm sure a part of you is still wondering if they are right to exclude celiac. I know just how you feel as I too had a negative biopsy, but by then a gluten challenge had already established how severely it affected me. So I was convinced I would be found to be celiac and in a funny way disappointed not to get the 'official' stamp of approval. Testing isnt perfect, you've already learned of the incomplete celiac tests offered by some organisations and the biopsy itself can only see so much. If you react positively to the gluten free diet it may mean you're celiac but not yet showing damage in a place they've checked, or it may be that you're non celiac gluten sensitive, which is a label that for a different but perhaps related condition which has only recently been recognised and for which research is still very much underway. We may not be able to say which but the good news is all of your symptoms: were also mine and they all resolved with the gluten free diet. So don't despair, you may still have found your answer, it just may be a bit wordier than celiac! Keep a journal when you're on the diet, it may help you track down your own answers. Best of luck!