No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.








Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Croissant?...ah Oui...or better yet, o No!

I'm a huge tennis fan and French Open groupie! I mean what can be better than hanging out in the City of Light and watching Rodger Federer dash around on the red clay?! So for the past couple of weeks I've been reading all about and watching as much of the tennis coverage from Paris as possible, and thinking back to the good old days when visiting Paris meant getting to partake in all the fabulous goodies from every Patisserie you passed and wolfing down croissants...ahhh I can still remember so vividly, ever bite of the last croissant I ate. It was September of 2000 and though I had already been diagnosed with Celiac Disease four months earlier, it was my last "hurrah," so to speak, with my favorite French pastry.

I remember the buttery, flakiness of each bite as my teeth sunk into the delicious and soft middle of the half-mooned-shaped delicacy. There are days, like today, when that memory conjures up not only the taste of heaven, but of all things Parisian...the city sounds, the Seine, sitting along the Ile de Cite...beauty and abundance, abound.

My point today, however, is intended to be more of a serious one...because I was very foolish looking back now, to have purposely eaten straight wheat/gluten months after my diagnosis...but this process of changing over an entire lifetime of eating habits and preferences takes time - a lot of time and a lot of convincing ourselves that we CAN do this. No one should ever kid you - it's tough!

I met a woman last week who is in her late 60's and was just diagnosed with Celiac a few months ago, along with her brother who is also in her age range. She was telling me how difficult this "new life" is and how she still regularly eats gluten, knowing it's just so impossible to completely rid from her diet and lifestyle...mind you she is also Basque and it's a hugely cultural thing to eat bread. A true Basco doesn't feel Basque when having to order a chorizo without the bread - let me tell you - it can mess with your psyche if you don't take the right approach and garner the right attitude. Okay, but back to the lovely woman I was
Ads by Google:

speaking of. So we had this long chat about how she can't break free of still consuming bread or donuts, etc. I kindly and carefully tried to express to her that this behavior can be very damaging and most of all, dangerous to her health and continued quality of life. She nodded her head in agreement and then said, "well, I give it my best try each day but I won't ever completely give up all wheat - I just can't do it."

Though I definitely understand and empathize, I do NOT agree with this way of thinking. I have an Aunt who most likely also has Celiac, but refuses to get tested. She would rather live in misery than face the facts, get tested, and make the correct adjustments to give her some quality of life - I mean really at the end of the day, it's only a piece of bread or a store-bought cookie that we've gone without. Life is so much more than simply food and in this day and age, we as Celiacs have quite an abundance of choices out there to enjoy, and can find almost everything a wheat-eater can consume. There are a plethora of websites now, blogs, on-line shopping and new gluten-free products arriving in stores weekly - (check out my list of sites on the right side of this blog). It is my firm belief that every diagnosed Celiac needs the utmost support from their circle of family and friends and advocates on their side, so if you know a Celiac or you yourself are one, make an extra effort to reach out and teach these folks how to LIVE without the dreaded gluten that can ultimately wreak such havoc upon our health and our lives.

So as much as I cherish Paris and Europe, when I'm visiting I no longer partake in anything that could make me sick...and with the Euro as strong as it is, I'm certainly not going to throw my good money away to be sick in a hotel room because I HAD to have a croissant! We are blessed to be able to eat so many fantastic foods and are even the more healthier because of that fact.

I would still take a night out on the town, in the City of Light with Rodger Federer, but I would have to say, "no merci" when offered that croissant!

Eat safely.

Eat gluten free.

Eat well.

Live with Abundance ~ Bon au revoir.

As always, Celiac.com welcomes your comments (see below).


Spread The Word







3 Responses:

 
zuz

said this on
11 Jun 2008 12:08:16 PM PST
A very nice article!

 
Terry

said this on
13 Aug 2009 7:15:50 AM PST
I was recently tested for celiac and the results were negative. But after digestive problems persisted I went to a holistic doctor and had a saliva test which indicated a severe (off the charts) gluten intolerance.

Are these compatible results in your opinion?

Thanks.

 
Aimee

said this on
19 Aug 2009 9:39:48 AM PST
Terry,
I'm certainly not a Dr. or a professional who can accurately diagnose anything for you, but I will say that I'm a huge believer in holistic therapies and have turned to acupuncture many times as my saving grace after being poisoned. I would say that there is a high probability that your saliva test is onto something!




Leave a reply:
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


It sounds like your hives resolved. I had a six month bout with them. Antihistamines really helped. My doctors are not sure if Mast Cell or autoimmune is the root cause.

My kid has Raynauds. It freaks her classmates out. She wears shoes and wool socks all year round and we live in a warm state. It is autoimmune. She manages it by layering, turning up the heat, use lots of blanket throws. I have Hashimoto?s and celiac disease. So, having multiple autoi...

Well, you do need to replace some things because they are too porous or damaged to remove gluten. Things like old wooden spoons, scratched non-stick pans, toaster, colander, sponges, etc. Honestly, the list is long, so try getting a few celiac books at the library or Amazon. Consider reading t...

When I woke up from my Endoscopy and was told I definitely had celiac disease the first thing I asked my doctor was do I need to get all new kitchen stuff? He assured me that I did not, and as long as my pots and pans and everything else was washed after being used to cook gluten I would have no ...

They have all given you good advice. Like Ennis_Tx said this is not medical advice. Just some observations. Ennis_Tx mentioned already a good B-complex. But people who have Perncious Anemia low B-12 have "Pens and Needles' feeling in their extremities. Mine was much more ...