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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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Exercise May Help Manage Celiac Disease

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Celiac.com 01/11/2017 - A study aimed at helping more than 110,000 Canadians living with celiac disease has been given a boost thanks to a Seed Grant from the University of Calgary's Faculty of Kinesiology.

Justine Dowd, Raylene Reimer, Guillaume Millet and principal investigator Nicole Culos-Reed are studying holistic, evidence-based approaches to help patients with this autoimmune disorder, which can cause bloating, diarrhea, constipation, and increased risk of intestinal cancers and osteoporosis.
"Our focus is on helping people to improve their quality of life," says Dowd, who was diagnosed with celiac disease six years ago. "Often, people are diagnosed and start to eat gluten-free, but still have a variety of negative symptoms."

The study, referred to as MOVE-C (Understanding the Relationship Between the MicrobiOme, Vitality and Exercise in Celiac Disease,) received $50,000 to conduct research into the ways in which the chronic condition can be managed beyond just adherence to a gluten-free diet.

Relying on 'gluten-free' label doesn't always work
According to Dowd, just looking for the words "gluten-free" on packaging might not be enough to manage the disease in a healthy way. "Lots of gluten-free food is very processed, low in nutrition, and high in calories, which causes this perfect storm. People are often underweight when they are diagnosed with celiac disease, and then if they are eating over processed, high-calorie foods, they can gain too much weight on a gluten-free diet and are at risk of health complications like metabolic syndrome."

In addition to promoting a whole foods diet, Dowd's team will be exploring the benefits regular exercise can have on patients. "Exercise is good for everyone, and we want to see how getting people with celiac disease more active can get them to a healthier weight status and healthier in general," says Dowd.

Aside from the obvious benefits, exercise may also help to promote a healthy balance of gut bacteria. "There are preliminary studies that show that exercise has led to a healthier microbiome in animals and humans," says Dowd.

Study seeks adult participants
Currently, the MOVE-C study is seeking adults (18 years of age and older), who have been diagnosed with celiac disease and do not engage in regular exercise, to participate in a free exercise program at the University of Calgary. Dowd has also developed an app, MyHealthyGut, that helps educate people about which foods are safe to eat, as well as record symptoms. Other key parts of the program will include interviews with experts on everything from acupuncture to sleep.

"It's about empowering people to manage their celiac disease," says Dowd. "I am so happy to be able to provide people with a program that is evidence-based. I wish I had had it myself years ago."
For inquiries about the free exercise program, please email move@ucalgary.ca
MyHealthyGut is available for download in the iTunes store.

About the University of Calgary
The University of Calgary is making tremendous progress on its journey to become one of Canada's top five research universities, where research and innovative teaching go hand in hand, and where we fully engage the communities we both serve and lead. This strategy is called Eyes High, inspired by the university's Gaelic motto, which translates as 'I will lift up my eyes.'

For more information, visit ucalgary.ca. Stay up to date with University of Calgary news headlines on Twitter @UCalgary. For details on faculties and how to reach experts go to our media center at ucalgary.ca/mediacentre

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Guest Janice Lamb

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Good to read about a study regarding the correlation between exercise and the gut! This is very interesting!

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