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Open Letter to the many GI sufferers Part 2 still suffering Look Beyond these symptom’s to the Parent Disease Pellagra with these many unruly children like IBS, GERD, UC, etc. up to and including NCGS and Celiac Disease (in Time I believe) Part 2

In Part 1 I mentioned many of the GI issues diseases I think this might help and have seen it help.

But most people only think of an “official diagnosis” and not co-morbidities in the same person.

Treating your Vitamin deficiency lets you treat your co-morbidities.

It is known as a 2ndary diagnosis in Sjorgen’s diesease as Pellagra has also been diagnosed

with SJD for example.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/263324686_Pellagra_in_a_patient_with_primary_Sjogren's_syndrome

Despite the conditions responding to Niacin(amide) --- Pellagra was still considered the 2ndary disease.

This is more common than people realize often.

You hear often “you” the average person doesn’t need to take a Vitamin but if you are reading

this blog you are not average. People with Celiac disease and other GI problems are known to be

low in a range of Vitamins.

See this link for appropriate supplementation with a celiac diagnosis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24195595

Niacin(amide) was not mentioned in this study but should be added/studied since

B-Vitamins are known to help Celiac’s.

At 58% co-morbidity of Pellagra in Celiac’s there is better than 50/50 chance your symptom’s

can be in remission in 6 months? If you are ONE of the many Pellagrins being diagnosed as Celiac disease today.

Gluten free works actually summarizes this topic well.

https://glutenfreeworks.com/blog/2017/07/18/niacin-vitamin-b3-deficiency-in-celiac-disease/

But still people are afraid to take a water soluble Vitamin that is known to help digestion problems.

Are you Afraid of a Vitamin? You needn’t bee! Praise bee to God!

I must always say *** This is not medical advice and should not be considered such. Results may vary.

Always consult your doctor before making any changes to your medical regimen but it helped me.

And I think it can help you too and why I share for “Sharing is Caring”.

2 Timothy 2: 7 “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things” this included.

Posterboy by the Grace of God,

 

*****Addendum I mean this to be some kind of “Opus”. My story! Yours might be different.

Now the onus is on you to try?

What you can do is urge your doctor to have you tested for Pellagra (though I doubt very seriously

you will test low). See this posterboy blog post that explains the difference in Primary and 2ndary Pellagra.

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/blogs/entry/2119-a-devastating-delay-celiac-pellagra-and-the-implementation-clinical-gap-in-recognizing-one-forover-the-other-which-twin-to-choosesave/

Anyone who eats a protein rich diet will not test low enough to be diagnosed as a Pellagrin

at least in the Western world.

You have bee near death, an alcoholic or homeless to be diagnosed as a Pellagrin today or

maybe an alcoholic homeless fellow who has severe Psorsias. . . might test positive for Pellagra

if they knew to test for it.

And why it usually shows up in war torn areas today because protein is limited in war. (and Alcoholics)

as seen in this House MD episode on Celiacs called Forever because Alcoholics have poor diets and

thus low in protein in their diets.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=house+season+2+episode+22+forever+daily+motion&view=detail&mid=C2050653028DE02DBDE6C2050653028DE02DBDE6&FORM=VIRE

What needs to be done to change this oft over looked fact is a study with Niacin to see if it helps Celiac’s.

See here where other B-Vitamins were shown to help Celiac’s.

https://www.celiac.com/articles/21783/1/B-Vitamins-Beneficial-for-Celiacs-on-Gluten-Free-Diet/Page1.html

this study was only as to how it (B-Vitamin supplementation) effects homeocysteine levels in people

diagnosed with Celiac disease.

Not if taking a B-complex or specifically the Niacinamide version of Niacin could help treat or

alleviate gluten antibodies in Celiacs with cross contamination.

A double blind study would have to be done but could be effectively tested with some time and effort.

This is only antidotal information with no confirmed medical research unless someone else takes the

ball and runs with it.

Plumbago you come to mind. But it doesn’t matter who it is.

The time has come to test this hypothesis to see if it is a “working theory”. I only know it helped me

and helps other I give the Vitamin B-3 as Niacinamide to . . . up to and including people who have

had an official NCGS diagnosis. Which tells’ me it would help other Celiac’s too if they would try it

(Niaciamide) 3/day for 6 months.

Note: No Follow up is done at two years to see if they are in remission after cross contamination

or if they have adhered strictly to a gluten free diet. But their clinical outcomes (symptom relief) appear

to greatly improve at 6 months including re-introducing problem foods such as dairy which they now

tolerate without GI distress.

I have tried to be a witness to what I have experienced.

(I speak as a man) that no other person Pellagin being diagnosed as Celiac disease instead would be

in the dark about this fact.

Romans 10:13-15 King James Version (KJV)

13 For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.

14 How then shall they call on him in whom they have not believed? and how shall they believe in him

of whom they have not heard? and how shall they hear without a preacher?

15 And how shall they preach, except they be sent? as it is written, How beautiful are the feet of them

that preach the gospel of peace, and bring glad tidings of good things!

When you get the right/correct diagnosis (if Pellagra is correct/parent diagnosis) it’s unruly child

Celiac will get better.

See this posterboy celiac.com blog post.

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/blogs/entry/2124-is-non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity-andor-celiac-disease-really-pellagra-in-disguise-in-the-21st-century-a-thoughtful-review-of-whether-to-supplement-or-to-not-supplement-by-the-posterboy-of-both-celiac-and-pellagra-a-fellow-sufferers-journey-to-peace/

I only know it is a devastating delay. To ignore one disease at the expense of the other.

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/blogs/entry/2119-a-devastating-delay-celiac-pellagra-and-the-implementation-clinical-gap-in-recognizing-one-forover-the-other-which-twin-to-choosesave/

quoting the celiac posterboy again

“A differential diagnosis is one of the best standard of medicine rarely practiced today and how

specialists decide between competing diseases like UC or Chron’s or IBS or Celiac Disease and

if I am right Co-Morbid Pellagra now forgotten for 75+ years since the “War on Pellagra” is now over

according to medical professionals’ but sadly the battle rages on for at least for the potential

3 Million American’s who are now being diagnosed as Celiac disease today instead.”

AS someone who has had BOTH Celiac and Pellagra. I can tell you that it can be difficult to tell them

apart sometimes (most times).

What we fail to understand often with any diagnosis there is continuum of disease/symptoms.

Yet we think of them as separate diseases Right?

I have unwittingly become the Celiac and Pellagra Posterboy .

Learn from my mistakes!

I have made too many (mistakes) to count.

Take as much honey (knowledge) as you can from my mistakes so bad (lack of knowledge) health

will not sting your quality of life.

So let’s say. Today they find a miraculous cure for Celiac disease or NCGS. . . it would take on average

17 years for doctor’s in Clinical settings to apply these technique’s to eradicate new Celiac

cases/diagnosis’s from occurring.

Now in this hypothetical case (which doesn’t exist yet or does IT? As a differential diagnosis

the answer is a definite YES) it would take another 17 years on average for doctors if they knew

today that Pellagra (which they don’t) can mimic Celiac disease in a Clinical setting.

But one does exist (it is not hypothetical) – a cure for Pellagra exists today. It has in fact existed

for 100+ years and still doctors don’t recognize it today.

I share/write these posterboy blog post’s so that others might not have to suffer the same things’

I have again in the future someday. . . I pray soon!

Now that you have the knowledge of my experience what will you do with it?

Every hour/patient/person matters.

And why I have tried diligently to educate other Celiac’s of this maddening fact.

All those who have ears to hear may they listen!

Feel free to read all my posterboy blog post’s if this pique’s your curiosity/interest but there

is only so much in a/one blog post than can be explained but it really Is not necessary

or visit the website/blog in my profile where I have told the same story hundreds of time that

ONE fellow sufferer like myself may/might be helped by the same wisdom, I found God being my help,

when I learned Pellagra and Celiac disease are Siamese twins and separating one

(supplementing one to death) will kill the other (cause the other to go into remission).

And I believe you can too! Praise bee to God!

2 Corinthians (KJV) 1:3,4

3) “Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies,

and the God of all comfort;

4) who comforteth us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort them (fellow sufferer)

which are in any trouble,

by the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God.”

Posterboy by the Grace of God,

 

EPILOGUE

A simple self-test is to prove this works for you and your friends.

It is to take Niacin as NIACINAMIDE usually one 300 count bottle is enough for a 3month supply.

I call it the NIACINAMIDE CHALLENGE.

You and a friend/family member begin taking it at the same rate.

Whatever that rate is – is fine.

But it needs to be at the same rate – consistently.

2/day or 3/day works (i.e., with each meal) works for most people.

If so two things will happen for you/them (if Pellagra is indeed Co-Morbid presenting

as Celiac Disease) then you/they will begin BURPING for the first time in years and years

(if at all) and their stool will begin to SINK to the bottom of the bowl.

***Not twenty minutes after eating something with bloating or burping with carbonation/soda

or beer etc. but BURPING 2 hours after a meal without the bloating you used to have.

It will start slowly and then be your new normal. The burping within a month of each other

will match up with your stool beginning to SINK where it did not before (or it did for me).

A witness of two is “true”.

Usually it takes 3 to 4 months taking the Niacinamide 1/day to notice these results

Usually it takes 2 to 3 months taking the Niacinamide 2/day to notice these results

Usually it takes 6 weeks to 2 months taking the Niacinamide 3/day to notice these results

If these are your results then together ya’ll have completed a self-test to confirm Pellagra was

causing your GI problems.

If it is the Vitamin making the difference your GI symptoms’ will improve. It is as simple as that.

I would recommend a 6 months regimen for most people. Two 300 count bottles equal

$50 Dollars worth of a B-Vitamin.

As I called this an open a letter to the many GI sufferers etc.

It doesn’t matter what part phase (spectrum) of the disease you are in it will (should) get better.

GERD, IBS, UC, NCGS or even Celiac disease if (low Niacin(amide) was the cause) you will have a

cause and effect reaction.

If you had Pellagra Co-Morbid and your GI improves with supplementation.

This almost always works if you are not now taking PPI’s like Nexium or Prilosec etc. . . .

If you are taking PPI’s then your “Way Back” may be a little longer but the trip back is the same.

****Again this is not medical advice but it is too cheap not to try and see if it works for you . . .

I have found it work for others.

****Note: I am only reporting what medical journals have concluded. It is just not well understood

today one disease is being diagnosed as the other because it can take a generation for this knowledge

to filter down to the clinical level.

Again a “Witness of Two” – you Both having the same reaction to the Vitamin proves Pellagra

was causing your symptom’s and the doctor’s don’t recognize it today in a Clinical setting.

The Journal of Psychosomatics says its well and I can’t say it better.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S003331821070668X?via%3Dihub

quoting the abstract

Pellagra: An Old Enemy of Timeless Importance Author links open overlay panelThomas M.BrownM.D.

Show more https://doi.org/10.1016/S0033-3182(10)70668-XGet rights and content

Background

“In the United States, pellagra is infrequently reported. Yet this disorder does occur among

malnourished persons.

Objective

The author seeks to clarify diagnosis and treatment.

Method

The author describes various presentations and effects of this disorder.

Results

Knowledge of classic and atypical presentations can assist in making the diagnosis.

The author presents two cases of pellagra that exemplify the classic and atypical presentations.

Conclusion

The typically robust response of the disorder to physiologic doses of niacin

can assist in confirming the diagnosis.”

*** This is not medical advice and should not be considered such. Results may vary.

Always consult your doctor before making any changes to your medical regimen.

But I am your witness people, have and do get better using this technique realizing a mistake

has been made in your/their diagnosis. It is the time honored medical

“Second Opinion” AKA a Differential Diagnosis.

Isn’t it about time to see if supplementing with Niacinamide will help your co-morbid Pellagra

symptom’s to see if your Celiac disease diagnosis was arrived at in error – no matter well intended

has keep you from getting better from Pellagra.

Quoting an old friend J. Dan Gill when he talks about the power of Truth to Free us!

Where/when he (Dan) talks about the difference between Truth and Error.

“The Truth is Always Better

The Truth, whatever it is,

Is always better than error,

Whatever it is.”

By J. Dan Gill

The truth is when an error/mistake is made. Admit it and move on to the correct/better

diagnosis so you can then get better!

And we have known how to treat Pellagra for a 100+ years but this generation having not

seen it in their lifetimes have forgot how to diagnose it! When they see it in its earliest forms. ..

they do not recognize it in a clinical setting anymore!

Those that have ears to hear? Listen! You can get better from Co-morbid Pellagra.

SADLY! Few listen. But some (Celiac’s) have heard (listened to) the good news that

Pellagra is reversible and have gotten better. Don’t be the Last!

****Again this is not medical advice but it is too easy, simple and cheap not too try

and see if it works for you too!. . . I have found it works for others. . . not already taking a

Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPIs) like Nexium or Prilosec etc . . .

Praise bee to God! To those who have listened and got better!

Just trying to help those still suffering (I believe) unnecessarily.

2 Corinthians (KJV) 1:3,4 3) “Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,

the Father of mercies, and the God of all comfort; 4) who comforteth us in all our tribulation,

that we may be able to comfort them which are in any trouble, by the comfort wherewith

we ourselves are comforted of God.”

Posterboy by the Grace of God,

2 Timothy 2:7 “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things” this included.



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"The time has come to test this hypothesis to see if it is a “working theory”. I only know it helped me

and helps other I give the Vitamin B-3 as Niacinamide to . . . up to and including people who have

had an official NCGS diagnosis. Which tells’ me it would help other Celiac’s too if they would try it

(Niaciamide) 3/day for 6 months."

 

This is could be very dangerous. People should talk to there doctors about this sort of thing.

Niacinamide is slow release or "non-flushing" form of vitamin b3.  One vitamin B-3 "pill" can contain

a very very very very high dosage of B-3. There are potential serious side effects of taking to much B-3.  Quick

release Niacin -with flush- may  be a lot safer as the body quickly uses it and gets rid of it quickly. 

The other b vitamins are generally considered safer from what I have read. 

https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements-niacin/art-20364984

Edit:

https://www.livescience.com/46839-dangers-of-niacin.html

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"Treating your Vitamin deficiency lets you treat your co-morbidities." Posterboy, this is such a huge statement that we all should take to heart. Thanks.

I would give odds that if she had been tested for it, Karen Carpenter, the singer who died of malnutrition blamed on her anorexia, supposedly a psychiatric disease, was a had Celiac. For that matter, I believe that Elvis Presley also had undiagnosed Celiac Disease.

Even after becoming gluten free one's intestines are still compromised, so that of the essential nutrients (41 vitamins and minerals) eaten only a portion is actually absorbed. Add this to the nutrients that are already low. Take for example iodine, which between the Dash diet killing iodized salt and bromine replacing iodine as a dough conditioner, and milk being frowned upon, the typical iodine intake of a an American is one half today of what it was in the 1960's. (eat one sheet of sushi nori a day, it is the iodine equivalent of 4 slices of bread from the 60's  for 40% of the upper limit RDA). This is the cause of the current proliferation of thyroid and testosterone deficiencies.

It is essential for someone recovering from acute Celiac to be aware of their vitamin and mineral intake, and to supplement as needed. There are 200 or so symptoms that improve with a GFD and most of them, like Pellegra, are related to some vitamin/mineral deficiency.

Another example is Choline, eggs are an excellent source, which the National Institutes of Health estimates most Americans are deficient, is essential for the neurotransmitter Acetylcholine and is the cure for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

 

 

 

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On 7/27/2019 at 8:21 AM, ch88 said:

"The time has come to test this hypothesis to see if it is a “working theory”. I only know it helped me

and helps other I give the Vitamin B-3 as Niacinamide to . . . up to and including people who have

had an official NCGS diagnosis. Which tells’ me it would help other Celiac’s too if they would try it

(Niaciamide) 3/day for 6 months."

 

This is could be very dangerous. People should talk to there doctors about this sort of thing.

Niacinamide is slow release or "non-flushing" form of vitamin b3.  One vitamin B-3 "pill" can contain

a very very very very high dosage of B-3. There are potential serious side effects of taking to much B-3.  Quick

release Niacin -with flush- may  be a lot safer as the body quickly uses it and gets rid of it quickly. 

The other b vitamins are generally considered safer from what I have read. 

https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements-niacin/art-20364984

Edit:

https://www.livescience.com/46839-dangers-of-niacin.html

Ch88,

I am familiar with that study....what is not emphasized is this is among people already taken a statin.

Yet they did not conclude statin's could be causing these issues....this was an additive to those taking statins...

this study was not only about Niacin alone...a weakness of the study.

Statins' have already been known to block for C0q10 possibly causing some of the issues reported in the study.

https://ubiquinol.org/statin-drugs

that said B-Vitamins (any Vitamins really) should not be taken 4 years or maybe drugs too without a break.

I usually get a year or two out of any drug I am taking before I have to change off of it before I develop side effects.

Ch88,  I actually couldn't find the research I was looking for but Niacinamide is actually produced by our body when we exercise.

Here are many ways Niacinamide can help someone.

http://doctorvolpe.com/add-adhd/vitamin-b3/

Usually 3 to 6 months is long enough to help those who are low in it.

see this research when used (B-Vitamins) for depression takes 3 months to plateau in the body.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2738337/

here is their comments on B-Vitamins

B-complex vitamins

"Nutrition and depression are intricately and undeniably linked, as suggested by the mounting evidence by researchers in neuropsychiatry. According to a study reported in Neuropsychobiology,[42] supplementation of nine vitamins, 10 times in excess of normal recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for 1 year improved mood in both men and women. The interesting part was that these changes in mood after a year occurred even though the blood status of nine vitamins reached a plateau after 3 months. This mood improvement was particularly associated with improved vitamin B2 and B6 status. In women, baseline vitamin B1 status was linked with poor mood and an improvement in the same after 3 months was associated with improved mood.

Thiamine is known to modulate cognitive performance particularly in the geriatric population.[43]"

Improvements shown after  3 months and improvements in their mental state up to a year after supplementation began.

You would not need to take any B-Vitamin for 4 years ...if you have/do you are taking the wrong one ...to begin with.

I took a FABB tablet for homocysteine levels for over 2 years (under a doctor's supervision) but my homocysteine levels never got better.

Only after taking B-2 Riboflavin a co-factor for B-6 did my homocysteine levels get better.

Here is more research about the Riboflavin MTHFR connection that I found out quite by accident  ...as most things I do....

I do them wrong to begin with ...but I try and learn from my mistakes....It is my hope others will learn from my mistakes too!

https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/blog/2019/02/26/mthfr-just-riboflavin-deficiency/ 

I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advise.

Posterboy,

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Posterboy,

I have read about possible benefits from taking high dose niacin for some people. However, I am still don't think it is safe. The daily value for niacin according to the Mayo Clinic is 16 milligrams (mg) a day. I can see how  taking a really high dosage of slow release Niacin could through off the bodies chemistry even if small dosages are okay. 

You linked to this blog in some of your posts so I am just pointing out my opinion.

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Niacin-HealthProfessional/

The other issue, for people to be aware of, is that vitamin deficiencies- and other symptoms- could be caused by other health problems, such cross contamination and Celiac disease, or other types of auto immune disorders or health problems. Vitamins could mask the symptoms but not treat the underlying problem.

I take a complete gluten free complete multivitamin/multimineral pill.

CH88

 

 

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23 hours ago, Posterboy said:

https://ubiquinol.org/statin-drugs

that said B-Vitamins (any Vitamins really) should not be taken 4 years or maybe drugs too without a break.

I usually get a year or two out of any drug I am taking before I have to change off of it before I develop side effects.

Ch88,  I actually couldn't find the research I was looking for but Niacinamide is actually produced by our body when we exercise.

Here are many ways Niacinamide can help someone.

From the link you mentioned:

"At the other end of the spectrum there are people who experience nausea and loss of appetite on a dose of 1,000 mg three times a day. When this happens, if these people are tested they will have elevated liver enzymes that correlate closely with the sensation of nausea. These people are very sensitive to niacinamide and they need to take less. As their nausea clears their liver enzymes will return to normal and never has there been any liver damage resulting from this transient elevation of liver enzymes."

That is taken from a blog post online. Here is more reliable information:

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Niacin-HealthProfessional/

"When taken in pharmacologic doses of 1,000 to 3,000 mg/day, nicotinic acid can also cause more serious adverse effects [2,4,14,37]. Many of these effects have occurred in patients taking high-dose nicotinic acid supplements to treat hyperlipidemias. These adverse effects can include hypotension severe enough to increase the risk of falls; fatigue; impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance; gastrointestinal effects, such as nausea, heartburn, and abdominal pain; and ocular effects, such as blurred or impaired vision and macular edema (a buildup of fluid at the center of the retina). High doses of nicotinic acid taken over months or years can also be hepatotoxic; effects can include increased levels of liver enzymes; hepatic dysfunction resulting in fatigue, nausea, and anorexia; hepatitis; and acute liver failure [2,14,30,38]. Hepatotoxicity is more likely to occur with the use of extended-release forms of nicotinic acid [14,39,40]. ."

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Ch88,

I am not trying to hide anything and I why I quoted a reputable source for Niacin.

Anything in excess even B-Vitamins might cause some side effects ....but I have found frequency is much more important than size

of the doses.....most of us will never absorb that much at one time...we usually top at around 200mg every 2 to 3 hours with B-Vitamins.

And why they added something to the formulation to have it delayed release ...the problem is what they used interfered with the effectiveness

of the B-Vitamin.

Here is a very technical study of these effect if you want to read it...but the flushing is a healthy response ...but most people wont' take it so I

naturally tell people to take Niacinamide precisely because it doesn't flush ....in the first place.

Here is the research entitle "Niacin Promotes Cardiac Healing after Myocardial Infarction through Activation of the Myeloid Prostaglandin D2 Receptor Subtype 1"

http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/360/3/435

it is through this same cell receptor that allows Niacin to treat/ameliorate UC symptom's.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/315634257_Niacin_ameliorates_ulcerative_colitis_via_prostaglandin_D_2_-mediated_D_prostanoid_receptor_1_activation

if you are taking multivitamin now then add a B-complex to that regimen at another meal.  ..once your bodies' urine turns bright (Neon) yellow.

Then you are bypassing your B-Vitamins through your urine.

https://www.livestrong.com/article/471584-why-do-vitamin-b-supplements-turn-urine-yellow/

Here is a nice celiac.com thread that talks extensive why and how SIBO, IBS, NCGS and/or Chron's and Celiac disease might be

subclinical Pellagra.

If had to argue it again. ...I might say it was Pellagra Sine Pellagra ...or Pellagra without Pellagra IE without Skin Lesions

https://med.libretexts.org/Courses/Sacramento_City_College/SCC%3A_Nutri_300_(Coppola)/Text/07%3A_Vitamins/7.3%3A_Water_Soluble_Vitamins/7.3B%3A_Vitamin_B₂_(Riboflavin)

the main difference without B-2 our body can't make it's own Niacin....so I jumped a stepped and supplemented with Niacinamide to replace

my missing B-Vitamins.

Again take a B-complex till your Urine is a Lurid Yellow and your body is then Bypassing through the Kidneys B-2 and will/can make again it's

own B-Vitamins again because B-2 Riboflavin is used as a Co-factor to build many of our other B-Vitamins like B-6, B-1, and Niacin naturally.

I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advise.

Posterboy,

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Celiac.com has many many members —thousands.    Has any member actually been diagnosed with Pellegra by a medical doctor?  Has anyone after World War II been diagnosed in the U.S.?  

“Improved socioeconomic conditions, change in dietary practices, and food fortification with niacin were all responsible for the eradication of pellagra from the post–World War II United States.”

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/985427-overview

the WHO reports Pellegra in underdeveloped countries where food is scarce fro things like drought or war.  I can not find any reports of pellegra in the US except a few cases where a woman and a few homeless men (who were alcoholics) suffered from Pellegra.  

https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/en/pellagra_prevention_control.pdf

What about celiac disease and Pellegra?  

The first and only case of pellagra associated with celiac disease was reported in 1999 by Schattner [131]”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3369470/

Posterboy, I am not a doctor nor a scientist, but I think I can safely say that Pellegra is NOT an issue for people in the US.  It is so rare that I challenge you to site more than a dozen cases of it in the US.  And those that have had it in the past,  did not consume a proper diet.     It was not due to malabsorption issues like celiac disease or Crohn’s.  Native Americans lived on corn for thousands of years adding ash to their corn thus preventing Pellegra.  They were smart.  

https://www.onondaganation.org/blog/2011/cooking-with-ashes/

No one in the US should worry about Pellegra.  Celiac.com members or guests who read this are most likely NOT poor if they have internet access.    Time to get off the Pellegra band wagon.   That means stop spreading false information from bogus websites and that is my personal opinion.  

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14 hours ago, cyclinglady said:

The first and only case of pellagra associated with celiac disease was reported in 1999 by Schattner [131]”

     I, personally, have had a whole list of things that are not associated with celiac disease that magically

disappeared or showed dramatic improvement when I stopped eating wheat and continues to improve as I improve my nutritional intake.

Celiac Disease is a disease of malabsorption, so it makes sense that someone with Celiac could present

with Pellegra symptoms and doctors would simply dismiss the connection because they are trained to look

for a single magic bullet. Notice that in the second quote, Celiac Disease is NOT listed as a cause of malabsorption.

Quotes from the WHO report, https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/en/pellagra_prevention_control.pdf

Quote

Pellagra is a multi-factorial dietary deficiency rather than a disease of insufficient intake of niacin per se.  It is most often found in people who consume maize,

Quote

There are rare cases when patients in good nutritional circumstances present with pellagra.  The main factors responsible for such cases of secondary pellagra are the following: (a) malabsorption: malabsorption is usually associated with jejuno-ileitis, gastroenterostomy and Crohn's disease. Gastrointestinal changes play an important part in the production or deterioration of  pellagra (Stratigos & Katsambas, 1977); (b) chronic alcoholism:  pellagra in chronic alcoholics is usually due to a combination of  their diets being very limited in niacin and tryptophan, and due to an incomplete absorption of the already poor diet 

Quote

 It is now known why milk, which contains little niacin, prevents pellagra, and why consumption of rice, which contains less niacin than maize, as a staple crop, does not lead to pellagra.  Milk and rice both have proteins with a higher tryptophan content than maize, and the niacin present is in a more bioavailable form.  Maize has a low tryptophan content and a relatively low niacin content which, in addition, is in the bound form so that only about 30% is bioavailable. 

Quote

niacin deficiency is commonly associated with deficiency of other nutrients, i.e. protein, riboflavin, pyridoxine,

thiamine, folic acid, vitamin A, magnesium, potassium, iron, and zinc

Quote

The studies carried out showed that the typical inadequate diets on which pellagra developed were deficient in other vitamins as well...
However, there was still confusion about the precise cause of pellagra as analyses of the diets of poor rice-eaters in India, among whom pellagra was not a problem, found nicotinic acid values even lower than in the diets of Romanians who had pellagra

 

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Cyclinglady,

If you go back and look at the link I quoted it was about a Riboflavin deficiency also known as Pellagra Sine Pellagra...NOT Pellagra....

but close enough to mimic GI Problems without Skin Involvements....

I was telling Ch88....I got it wrong....I did not have Pellagra because my skin was not involved in my diagnosis...it was a Riboflavin deficiency

instead....and can be easily when you get enough B-2 in your urine.

Riboflavin is a master Co-factor ....for other vitamins ....think of it like BASF of the metabolic/nutrition/biological world....

B-2 does make  you sick by itself like Aids progressing to HIV but the things you get low in why your low in B-2 will make you sick.

Medical news today has a nice overview on a Riboflavin deficiency.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/219561.php

quoting some revelant portions ...read it all when you get  a chance.

Along with vitamin A, vitamin B(2) is essential for:

  • Maintaining the mucous membranes in the digestive system
  • Maintaining a healthy liver
  • Converting tryptophan into niacin, an amino acid
  • Keeping the eyes, nerves, muscles and skin healthy
  • Absorbing and activating iron, folic acid, and vitamins B1, B3 and B6
  • Hormone production by the adrenal glands
  • Preventing the development of cataracts
  • Fetal development, especially in areas where vitamin deficiency is common

Some research suggests that vitamin B2 may help prevent cataracts and migraine headache, but further studies are needed to confirm this.

Other studies have found that in children with autism, supplements of vitamins B2, B6, and magnesium appear to reduce the levels of abnormal organic acids in the urine."

It is me again you can see when you get low in B2 ...you can be low in a lot of other vitamins.

https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/nutritional-disorders/vitamin-deficiency,-dependency,-and-toxicity/riboflavin

the merck manual says if you

"Suspect riboflavin deficiency in patients with characteristic symptoms and other B vitamin deficiencies; confirm it with a therapeutic trial of riboflavin supplements or measurement of urinary excretion of riboflavin.

Treat with supplement of riboflavin and other water-soluble vitamins."

Posterboy,

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On 8/1/2019 at 6:16 PM, Posterboy said:

I am not trying to hide anything and I why I quoted a reputable source for Niacin.

 

You may not be trying to hide anything, but you do seem to have very different views on Celiac disease and the treatment for it.

We are trying to help people and give clear and accurate information on this forum. Everyone including every celiac assocation that exists

agree that the only treatment for Celiac disease is a gluten free diet. You post frequently on this forum and answer questions about Celiac

disease. However on this blog post you make statements like.

"When you get the right/correct diagnosis (if Pellagra is correct/parent diagnosis) it’s unruly child

Celiac will get better."

New people on this forum sometimes think they can get over there Celiac disease with time or that cheat on the diet is not a big deal or

that they can get away with it if they don't see the symptoms. Promoting this false information, frustrates me and other people on the forum. Normal stomach acid is not able to

break down gluten and it still travels into the intestine and causes damage to the intestine or other auto immune problems. There is no cure for celiac disease other than a gluten

free diet. This may seem harsh but I feel this blog entry is very misleading and potentially dangerous.

Niacin is converted into uric acid and high dose niacin has been linked to diabetes. Decreased blood sugar control is a very big deal. I don't know but 

it seems to me in your last post that you might still be saying that high dose Niacin without the flush is safe. 

From the site I quoted:

"To minimize the risk of adverse effects from nicotinic acid supplementation or to identify them before they become serious, the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recommend measuring hepatic transaminase, fasting blood glucose or hemoglobin A1C, and uric acid levels in all supplement users before they start therapy, while the dose is being increased to a maintenance level, and every 6 months thereafter [30]. The societies also recommend that patients not use nicotinic acid supplements or stop using them if their hepatic transaminase levels are more than two or three times the upper limits of normal; if they develop persistent hyperglycemia, acute gout, unexplained abdominal pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, new-onset atrial fibrillation, or weight loss; or if they have persistent and severe skin reactions, such as flushing or rashes."

As far as niacin having an anti inflammatory effect on ulcerative colitis, that might be true. Over all Niacin could still be dangerous or set off a UC flare. Nasian and anxiety are possible symptoms of taking to much Niacin I high fiber diet also be beneficial because it stimulates the same receptors as Niacin according to one source I read. 

There aren't the quite same warnings, I don't think about other b vitamins on the national institute of health website.

It does have good information though about taking vitamin b twelve and dosages of other vitamins. 

My urine does turn yellow when I take a b vitamin. Urine color isn't a very good information about vitamin absorption or nutritional status. Maybe someone has kidney damage n this forum and this effects what vitamins are retained? I don't know it seems possible to me. If someone suspects they are deficient in a vitamin, or they have symptoms they should talk to a doctor about it. The National Insitute of Health also has good information about dosage and the possible symptoms of vitamin deficiencies. Nothing on this blog should be taken as medical advice. Especially not about the things about Celiac disease and NCGS. 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, ch88 said:

gluten...travels into the intestine and causes damage to the intestine or other auto immune problems. There is no cure for celiac disease other than a gluten

free diet. This may seem harsh but I feel this blog entry is very misleading and potentially dangerous.

In my experience, there seems to be two levels of Celiac Disease: Acute and Chronic.

Chronic is when you have symptoms that are annoying; for example my whole life,

until I went GFD at 63, I was a mouth breather. It is something there is no medical cure for,

and no medical explanation for, but plenty of "treatments". Acute is when the symptoms are

life threatening and don't respond to medical treatments. It seems that Celiac Disease is the disease of

last choice. When the normal medical treatments fail and after thousands of dollars and ages of suffering

if you are lucky someone suggests a Gluten free diet. Hopefully, none of those treatments caused other

damage. Gluten causes damage to intestinal villi, leading to malabsorption syndrome and multiple vitamin and

mineral deficiencies which will present differing symptoms. Which symptoms exactly is likely dependent on

individual diet and environment.

Just like there ain't no cure for the summertime blues there ain't no cure for Celiac Disease.

Wheat is poison to us. Given time and a nutritious Gluten Free Diet including all the essential nutrients, you will show

improvement and you may even be able to tolerate occasional ingestion of gluten again. Make no mistake, at best,

your chronic symptoms, if not your acute symptoms, will return if you make a habit of it.

 

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23 hours ago, ch88 said:

frustrates me and other people on the forum. Normal stomach acid is not able to

break down gluten and it still travels into the intestine and causes damage to the intestine or other auto immune problems

Ch88,

I know I won't be able to say this right and I am sorry for that.....low stomach and no stomach acid has been studied in Celiac's

See this research entitled "Gastric morphology and function in dermatitis herpetiformis and in coeliac disease."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3992169

when our pH get's over 3.0 approx. we lose our ability to digest proteins...eva untersmayr has done the most work on this topic.

https://www.eaaci.org/attachments/1_EAACI winter school 2014_Untersmayr_Food Allergies.pdf

see around slide 10 to 15 ...a pH of 2.0 will digest gluten/wheat very effectively in the stomach so it doesn't get to the small intestine.

the lower the stomach (Higher pH) one's stomach acid gets' the less it is able to digest proteins.

Proteins of all sorts will set off this reaction......

Cyclinglady lady is right...no body is diagnosed straight out with Pellagra these days.

It is always as a complication of another disease like chrons or celiac disease.

see this research on chrons and pellagra entitled "Pellagra as the presenting manifestation of Crohn's disease."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7060914

I quote the abstract for reference.

"Pellagra as the presenting manifestation of Crohn's disease.

Pollack S, Enat R, Haim S, Zinder O, Barzilai D.

Abstract

An 18-yr-old woman hospitalized with classical signs of pellagra was found to have Crohn's disease of the small and large bowel as well

as malabsorption of nicotinic acid and iron. The symptoms of pellagra disappeared after intramuscular treatment with nicotinic acid,

while the malabsorption was corrected following steroid therapy for the Crohn's disease. Pellagra should thus be added to the list of

complications of Crohn's disease that are secondary to malabsorption. Although this complication seems to be very rare,

it may be worthwhile to check for nicotinic acid malabsorption in untreated cases of Crohn's disease in order to determine its real prevalence"

It is me again. ..most people don't know there are two types of Pellagra.

Once is Primary (Alcoholic) etc. and the other in 2ndary (due to malabsorption) and this is the type most common in Celiac's

But you won't know whether it is primary or 2ndary type unless you supplement.

the International Journal of Celiac disease wrote an article about this connection which in part confirmed for me at least...

this connection to a 2ndary development of Pellagra in Celiac's.

Here is the research. http://pubs.sciepub.com/ijcd/3/1/6/

they say quoting their section on Pellagra and celiac disease comorbitiies (disease that occur together)

3. Pellagra and celiac disease

The two diseases can be connected in two aspects. 58% of pellagra patients were shown to have malabsorption and many had intestinal pathology on biopsies [36, 37]. Alternatively, Pellagra was described in celiac disease [38]. The skin manifestations in pellagra might have some additional etiologies, since multiple nutrient deficiencies are at the origin of the cutaneous manifestations in celiac disease. The following nutritional deficiencies inducing skin rashes, were describe in celiac disease: Zinc, Iron, Vitamin A, E, B12, niacin, folate, selenium and essential fatty acids [39, 40].

It is me again.

I am not saying anything the IJCD hasn't said ....I am just more consistent on insisting this connection needs to be explored/proven

with supplementation to see which is the parent disease ....only one will remain if we pick the right twin.

Here is my blog post about this connection....it explains this complex relationship in more detail.

https://www.celiac.com/blogs/entry/2119-a-devastating-delay-celiac-pellagra-and-the-implementation-clinical-gap-in-recognizing-one-forover-the-other-which-twin-to-choosesave/

Both should not exist together???? unless one is 2ndary to the other....if it 2ndary then it should be supplemented away...

so you can win the front in the war that remains....we can't win a two front war...

https://www.celiac.com/blogs/entry/2124-is-non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity-andor-celiac-disease-really-pellagra-in-disguise-in-the-21st-century-a-thoughtful-review-of-whether-to-supplement-or-to-not-supplement-by-the-posterboy-of-both-celiac-and-pellagra-a-fellow-sufferers-journey-to-peace/

Once I begin burping incessantly I knew my stomach acid was again strong enough to digest proteins in my diet.

this will  not work well if you are currently taking acid reducers like H2 blockers or PPIs because you will pulling against yourself.

I am reducing my time on the forum because this has taken longer to explain than I thought it would....I still comment a couple times

a week or when a thread is active....

I know I won't be able answer all your questions but Pellagra as 2ndary condition of Celiac is proven in the literature as well in Chron's and other

diseases.....the question is which came first the chicken or the egg....only supplementation or more testing can tell you which.

Low stomach acid did in my opinion...this has been studied with PPIs.

https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-gluten-intolerance-research/do-proton-pump-inhibitors-increase-risk-of-celiac-disease-r2860/

I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advise.

Posterboy,

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On 8/5/2019 at 4:55 PM, Posterboy said:

when our pH get's over 3.0 approx. we lose our ability to digest proteins...eva untersmayr has done the most work on this topic.

 

On 8/5/2019 at 4:55 PM, Posterboy said:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3992169

when our pH get's over 3.0 approx. we lose our ability to digest proteins...eva untersmayr has done the most work on this topic.

https://www.eaaci.org/attachments/1_EAACI winter school 2014_Untersmayr_Food Allergies.pdf

see around slide 10 to 15 ...a pH of 2.0 will digest gluten/wheat very effectively in the stomach so it doesn't get to the small intestine.

Posterboy,

My understanding is gluten is an ambiguous term for proteins found in Wheat. There are long protein chains, and folded chains that have a certain shape. The long chains are what makes bread have it's dough like consistency. People with  Celiac disease react to the folded chains. These folded chains

are hydrophobic. This means they repel water. Without added enzymes their is no way for the stomach to digest them. 

 

There are enzymes that are made by the liver which enter the intestine at a lower place from the stomach. These enzymes break up

"gluten" into fragments.  My understanding is that is unlikely-but possible- for someone to be allergic to proteins that are very easily digested in the stomach.

Rice for example is not very allergic as it can be broken down easily and quickly.  Gluten though is not able to be digested without 

additional enzymes.  For a wheat allergy, I am not very familiar with that, but I do know that people can be allergic to anything.  Different people with a 

wheat allergy might be reacting to different things.

 

Here is a reference link: The premise of the whole study is that the enzymes tested may be ineffective at degrading gluten within simulated stomach conditions.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4452362/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4969619/

 

Certain cells in the digestive track -called payers patches- are able to sense proteins in the digestive track and they are thought to play a roll in preventing allergies.

If someone is exposed to some foods at an earlier age they are less likely to become allergic to it in the future. Food allergies are probably complicated. One type of immune

reaction IGG for example can cancel out a IGE response. 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3004000/

 

I don't have the research off hand to back this up.....but it stands to reason if you drink water for example and eat a little bit of bread...some

of the water with gluten in it may drain out of the stomach immediately and into the intestine. It only takes a small amount of gluten to damage the intestine.

 

This just means that someone with Celiac disease or NCGS shouldn't eat gluten. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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https://www.tuscany-diet.net/proteins/digestion/#Stomach-and-protein-digestion

"Pepsin, an endopeptidase with an optimum pH of activity at 1.6, hydrolyses 10-20% of the proteins in the meal. Many digestive enzymes are able to act on a wide range of substrates, and pepsin is no exception, catalyzing the cleavage of peptide bonds adjacent to amino acid residues such as leucine and phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan (aromatic amino acids). A mixture of peptides of large size and a few free amino acid are produced.
Pepsin action is important not so much for its direct contribution to protein digestion, that is modest, but for the release of peptides and amino acids which, at the duodenal level, stimulate the secretion of cholecystokinin, and therefore the duodenal/pancreatic phase of protein digestion (see below)."

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On 8/5/2019 at 4:55 PM, Posterboy said:

I know I won't be able answer all your questions but Pellagra as 2ndary condition of Celiac is proven in the literature as well in Chron's and other

diseases.....the question is which came first the chicken or the egg....only supplementation or more testing can tell you which.

The most likely possibility by far is that Celiac disease causes Niacin deficiency.  I don't have time to go through all your arguments for why you think Celiac disease might be

caused by Niacin deficiency. I doubt that Niacin deficiency is ever an issue if you don't have some sort of major malabsorption  problem or are eating really poorly.

 

It is well proven in that celiac disease can cause nutritional deficiencies. Pellagra happens if someone Alcoholic because their body is not making 

enough tryptophan, and they aren't getting enough from their diet. Or they also could have very very severe malabsorption. Niacin is found in high

quantities in a large number of different foods.. Pellegra is a very very extreme and rare disorder. My non medical opionion

is that Pellagra causes major general health type problems. These included leaky gut and indigestion and other multi organ type problems. Celiac disease

in known to cause other major health problems. If the symptoms overlap in some way that doesn't surprise me at all. 

 

As far as low stomach acid being linked to inflammation that is true, but low stomach acid can be caused by a lot of things. H. pyrlori infection

for example can lower stomach acid levels. It is thought that diet changes the ph in the stomach and that can allow H. pyrlori to infect the stomach.

There papers  trying to figure out if h pylori infection increases or decreases celiac disease risk.  Diet is known to effect stomach ph.

https://celiac.org/about-the-foundation/featured-news/2014/02/celiac-disease-risk-linked-to-absence-of-bacteria-in-the-gut/

Baking soda may have an anti inflammatory effect because it works the opposite way as PPI's.  It neutralizes acid in the stomach and

and up regulates stomach acid production.  It also may effect how other organs work. 

Also high dose Niacin makes allergies worse. 

 

I don't see any reason to single out Niacin over other vitamin deficiencies such as vitamin d, vitamin b twelve, magnesium the other vitamins or minerals.

Each of those could be a symptom of celiac disease. The vitamins also have antinflammatory properties. Getting enough vitamin d, for example, is know to reduce the risk of celiac disease.

 

I never took PPI or anything like that and I have Celiac disease. 

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On 8/4/2019 at 7:49 PM, Wheatwacked said:

Just like there ain't no cure for the summertime blues there ain't no cure for Celiac Disease.

Wheat is poison to us. Given time and a nutritious Gluten Free Diet including all the essential nutrients, you will show

improvement and you may even be able to tolerate occasional ingestion of gluten again. Make no mistake, at best,

your chronic symptoms, if not your acute symptoms, will return if you make a habit of it.

Actually there is a cure for celiac disease. Or the symptoms anyway.....you can swallow a tape worm and it suppresses the immune

system in the gut. Or so I heard once. Don't try this at home.

 

The problem is celaic inflammation may-or may not I don't know- start out in one area and spread to other areas of the gut. If the symptoms are delayed it doesn't

mean you aren't damaging your gut or aren't damaging parts of it. Or there might be a strong immune reaction happening....and the gut could still hide it for a while.

 

None of the above is medical advice, and I am not a doctor.

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Quote

Excerpt from the Merck Manual: 

Celiac disease is a malabsorption disorder.

Etiology 

Celiac disease is a hereditary disorder caused by sensitivity to the gliadin fraction of gluten, a protein found in wheat;

similar proteins are present in rye and barley. In a genetically susceptible person, gluten-sensitive T cells are activated

when gluten-derived peptide epitopes are presented. The inflammatory response causes characteristic mucosal villous

atrophy in the small bowel.   https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/gastrointestinal-disorders/malabsorption-syndromes/celiac-disease.
 

On ‎8‎/‎5‎/‎2019 at 6:55 PM, Posterboy said:

two types of Pellagra.

Once is Primary (Alcoholic) etc. and the other in 2ndary (due to malabsorption)

It is my belief, based on my experience, that Alcohol Addiction is caused by eating Wheat. The professionals see an alcoholic with Pellagra and jump

to the 'obvious conclusion' that alcohol addiction is the cause of the malnutrition; and alcoholism is incurable anyway so don't bother to look further?

So, Primary Pellagra due to alcoholism is just another manifestation of undiagnosed Celiac Disease

How many alcoholics do you know that are Gluten Free?

I don't know any, other than myself.

 

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1 hour ago, Wheatwacked said:
  Quote

Excerpt from the Merck Manual: 

Celiac disease is a malabsorption disorder.

Etiology 

Celiac disease is a hereditary disorder caused by sensitivity to the gliadin fraction of gluten, a protein found in wheat;

similar proteins are present in rye and barley. In a genetically susceptible person, gluten-sensitive T cells are activated

when gluten-derived peptide epitopes are presented. The inflammatory response causes characteristic mucosal villous

atrophy in the small bowel.   https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/gastrointestinal-disorders/malabsorption-syndromes/celiac-disease.
 

On 8/5/2019 at 5:55 PM, Posterboy said:

two types of Pellagra.

Once is Primary (Alcoholic) etc. and the other in 2ndary (due to malabsorption)

It is my belief, based on my experience, that Alcohol Addiction is caused by eating Wheat. The professionals see an alcoholic with Pellagra and jump

to the 'obvious conclusion' that alcohol addiction is the cause of the malnutrition; and alcoholism is incurable anyway so don't bother to look further?

So, Primary Pellagra due to alcoholism is just another manifestation of undiagnosed Celiac Disease

How many alcoholics do you know that are Gluten Free?

I don't know any, other than myself.

Wheatwacked,

This research might help you....

Kareng and I are discussing these connections on another  thread.

I had been aware of AA found Bill W. use of Niacin in treatment of Alcoholics ....but he ran into to trouble with the American Psychiatric Association.

Here is an article about it....

https://www.psychotherapy.net/blog/title/alcoholics-anonymous-founder-bill-wilson-s-long-lost-treatment-paradigm

this is what you would expect if the dementia's Pellagra  IE depression etc. and (craving for alcohol) is being diagnosed today as

alcoholism today.

We can see this association in the possible connection to Alcoholism in Celiac's. Celiac.com did an article on it a few years ago.

https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-gluten-intolerance-research/alcohol-can-trigger-gluten-sensitivity-in-genetically-susceptible-individuals-r2880/

what is striking about it is ...the people who get alcohol ataxia ...also have the same gene (approx.) as those who get gluten ataxia.

this might explain these connections you notice.... that is partly why B-Complex's are recommended for recovering alcoholics.

the alcohol uses strips them off their B-Vitamins....

Here is a livestrong article about it.

https://www.livestrong.com/article/492456-b-complex-vitamins-for-recovering-alcoholics/

It is known as the PAWS syndrome....you might of heard of it...if not try taking you a B-complex...it does more good than harm usually.

It usually takes about 3 months to notice a significant difference in your moods.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2738337/

see their paragraph on B-complex's.

I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advise.

Posterboy,

Edited by Posterboy

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7 hours ago, Wheatwacked said:

 

The consumption of wheat as a cause of alcoholism?  I have never heard that as a cause or even as a risk factor.  Alcohol has been around for about 9,000 years.  The Chinese made it from fermented rice, honey and fruit.  I imagine that there was alcoholism back then.   The Aztecs and Mayans also had an alcoholic drink, yet they did not cultivate wheat but ate corn with added ashes.  

http://www.hispaniccommission.org/index.php/en/the-aztecs-and-alcohol

https://www.alcohol.org/alcoholism/the-causes/

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23 hours ago, Posterboy said:

Bill W. use of Niacin in treatment of Alcoholics

I am familiar with it. Oddly enough, before I became an alcoholic in the mid eighties,

I was a male orderly in 1972 at the Oakland Hospital (California) acute alcohol rehab ward.

Vitamin shots were a regular part of the recovery protocol we used. Oakland was also one

of the first hospitals to have AA meetings in the hospital as part of the recovery protocol. The

vitamin shots helped with the immediate health issues of many of our patients, especially those

with delirium tremors, but did little regarding the addiction.

18 hours ago, cyclinglady said:

I have never heard that as a cause or even as a risk factor.

Does not mean it ain't so. And Alcoholism falls into the group of symptoms of "we don't know

why but it can't possibly be wheat". I became alcoholic, meaning not that I drank a lot, but I could

not stop drinking until I was unconscious or there was none left, in 1984 or so. A few years after

moving back to the US after 8 years in Israel In retrospect this coincided with an increased

consumption of wheat based foods. In 1995 I had pancreatitis (Triglycerides tested over 10,000),

spent a week in the hospital NPO (nothing by mouth) in hopes I would resume normal intestinal

movement, and was released to a 30 day rehab, where I was on a low fat diet. I did well in rehab

without cravings most of the time, but the day after release I was drinking again. Reinforcing the

belief it was entirely in my head and it was psychological brought on by environment

issues that made me drink. But what no one looks at is that during that rehab time my diet had

little wheat in it. I occasionally had a slice of bread with breakfast, and as a treat I would have Raisin

Bran in the evening one or twice a week. I wonder if those were the few occasions that I had cravings during rehab.

The day I was released we stopped at Wendy's for a celebratory burger on a roll and a return to my SAD diet.

The next day I was drinking again. Fast forward to Thanksgiving 2014. 30 years of on and off

drink control but if I drank, I ALWAYS HAD to finish it. The (apparent) goal when I drank was to get drunk

and I only stopped when I was unconscious or out of booze and too drunk to go out. Again, makes you

think psychological. After a week of Gluten Free Diet, I chose to celebrate how much better I felt by

getting drunk. It is what alcoholics do. Only now I didn't like it. I did not finish the bottles I had bought.

A few weeks earlier I was finishing off two bottles of Saki a day (I had to give up the daily pint of

Vodka because it was too corrosive) and out of nowhere I am barely finishing one glass. What changed?

GFD. Five years later I only have a drink on the rare social occasion, and when I do I rarely finish it.

The cravings that made me drink out of control disappeared when I stopped eating gluten. 

 

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