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Ataxia, Nerve Disease, Neuropathy, Brain Damage and Celiac Disease

This category contains summaries of research articles that deal with ataxia, nerve disease and brain damage and their association with celiac disease. Most of the articles are research summaries that include the original source of the summary.

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    Inflammatory diet linked to brain aging. Photo: CC--GreenFlame09

    Researchers think they may have discovered an important connection between diet and dementia.

    For the first time, they have tied a specific dietary pattern to blood markers for inflammation. In addition, they showed that elderly adults who followed a certain dietary pattern had reduced brain gray matter volume, and worse visuospatial cognitive function.



    Photo: CC--Dr Ramneet Bullar--Veteran's Affairs

    What is the effect of gluten-free diet on cerebellar MR spectroscopy in gluten ataxia?

    Gluten ataxia is defined as sporadic ataxia with positive antigliadin antibodies without an alternative cause. Gluten ataxia patients often receive MRS at baseline and again after a period on a gluten-free diet.

    A research team recently set out to evaluate the effect of gluten free diet on magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the cerebellum in patients with gluten ataxia.



    Photo: CC--Peter Shanks

    Although autoimmune disorders are not widely associated with Parkinson disease, there is increasing evidence for a link between immunity and neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, both innate and adaptive immunity have been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders.

    A team of researchers recently set out to examine the connection between immunity and neurodegenerative disorders.



    Photo: CC--Affen Ajlfe

    Previously, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in de novo celiac disease patients has signaled an imbalance in the excitability of cortical facilitatory and inhibitory circuits.

    Researchers have reported that, after about of 16 months on a gluten-free diet, patients experience a global increase of cortical excitability, which suggests some kind of compensation for disease progression, likely mediated by glutamate.



    Are autoimmune disease tied to increased dmentia risk? Photo: CC--A Syn

    A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether hospital admission for autoimmune disease is associated with an elevated risk of future admission for dementia.

    The research team included Clare J Wotton, and Michael J Goldacre, both affiliated with the Unit of Health-Care Epidemiology, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.



    Image: CC-- Dierk Schaefer

    Cerebellar ataxias can be caused by a wide range of disease processes, either genetic or acquired. Establishing a clear diagnosis requires a methodical approach with expert clinical evaluation and investigation.



    Image: CC--Roger H. Goun

    Neurological problems are a very common effect of gluten intolerance. Whether you have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, there is research showing that gluten can cause nervous system problems in affected individuals.



    Photo: CC--Tech.Co

    Researchers examine a possible link between gluten and brain ataxia.



    Concusssion study. Image: CC--University of the Fraser Valley

    So far, 2014 has been a challenging new year for me. I was reminded of some events that happened almost fifty years ago. Based on that reminder, I resolved to contact a former girlfriend, both to suggest that she get testing for celiac disease, and to apologize for some insensitive things I said and did when I was 17.



    Photo: CC--Chris Violette

    You think you have a crazy celiac disease diagnosis story? Try this one. When a college student fell and struck his shoulder while showering, he went to the emergency treatment center.



    Is Alzheimer disease connected to other immune-mediated disease? Photo: CC-- Hey Paul Studios

    Is there a genetic connection between immune-mediated diseases and Alzheimer disease?



    Photo: CC--Todd Huffman

    Vice President Dan Quayle famously stated: "what a waste it is to lose one's mind, or not to have a mind is being very wasteful, how true that is," when speaking to people involved in the United Negro College Fund (1). While it is entertaining to read and ponder, this statement evokes some ideas I have about senility, which is increasing, along with many other modern diseases, at a frightening speed. The prospect of losing my mind, my memory, my sense of connection with friends and loved-ones, and even my sense of identity and personal hygiene is a frightening spectre.



    Synapses. Photo: CC--RuffRootCreative.com

    Results of a new study show that patients with celiac disease and NCGS have similar neurological manifestations, and that these respond well to a gluten-free diet.



    A nurse administers a neurological test to a patient's arm. Photo: CC--PACAF

    For celiac patients with neurological symptoms, many questions remain. Among them, the significance of anti-neuronal antibodies.



    Can researchers improve treatment for immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias? Photo: CC--Marco Bellucci

    Despite the identification of an increasing number of immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias, there is no proposed standardized therapy. Can researchers change that?



    Photo: CC--Salford Institute

    People with celiac disease frequently report cognitive symptoms when they are exposed to gluten, and clinicians have documented cognitive deficits in some patients with newly diagnosed celiac disease.



    Kids at playground. Photo: CC: Eden, Janine and Jim

    Patients with type 1 diabetes who have celiac disease face in increased risk for retinopathy and nephropathy. A team of researchers recently set out to investigate whether celiac disease associated with type 1 diabetes increases the risk of microvascular complications.



    Image: CC--Margherita J. L. Lisoni

    Earlier research on celiac disease and neuropathy has been hampered by the use of inpatient data, low study power, and lack of information on neuropathic characteristics.



    Tel Aviv's Sourasky Medical Center. Photo: CC--SA 3.0

    It's well-known that many people with celiac disease experience neuropathy and other nerve disorders. Now, a team of Israeli researchers are cautiously proposing a link between gluten reactions and ALS.



    Photo: CC--SA 3.0

    Many people with celiac disease report suffering from impaired cognition or ‘brain fog,’ but no good study had been done until a research team took an in-depth look at the issue.


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