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Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Condition Associated with Celiac Disease

This category contains summaries of research articles that deal with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) and it's association with celiac disease. Most of the articles are research summaries that include the original source of the summary.

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    Image: CC--hazma butt

    Dermatitis herpetiformis is an autoimmune skin-blistering disease which is commonly associated with celiac disease. The most common treatments are a gluten-free diet along with the addition of dapsone. DH that does not respond to either a gluten-free diet, or to dapsone, is treated with other immune-suppressing medications, but results have been mixed. Now, for the first time, a patient treated with rituximab therapy had resolution of both his pruritus and skin rash.



    What's the role of nickel exposure in gluten-related diseases? Photo: CC--Yaybiscuits12

    Does nickel have a role to play in gluten‐related diseases? Nickel is the most common cause of contact allergy, and nickel exposure can result in systemic nickel allergy syndrome, which mimics irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Nickel is also found in wheat, which invites questions about possible nickel exposure from wheat in some cases of contact dermatitis. However, nickel hasn't really been studied in relation to gluten‐related diseases.



    Refractory dermatitis herpetiformis different than refractory celiac disease. Photo: CC--ProVillage9991

    Dermatitis herpetiformis is a skin disease that causes blistering, and is understood to be an external symptom of celiac disease. Refractory celiac disease, which does not respond to a gluten-free diet and which carries an increased risk of lymphoma, is well-known to clinicians and researchers. New research shows that guts of patients with refractory dermetitis herpetiformis respond positively to a gluten-free diet.



    Image: CC--Practical Cures

    Six times from 2003 – 2005, I had a mysterious full-bodied, itchy, blistery rash that landed me in the emergency room the first time, where seven doctors shook their heads. The ER physicians agreed that it was a "systemic chemical reaction" and tried to identify what I could have been exposed to. A dairy allergy was ruled out immediately since I have been completely dairy-free for twenty years.



    Photo: CC--Mysi Ann

    Lots of people find it hard to believe that such a common food as wheat/gluten could possibly be implicated in causing skin diseases. They say something like this: "Everyone eats wheat, but not everyone gets skin troubles—so it can't be wheat!" This logic is flawed.



    Photo: Wiki Media Commons--endofskull

    Exposure to stressful stimuli, such as inflammation, cause cells to up-regulate heat shock proteins (Hsp), which are highly conserved immunomodulatory molecules. Research points to Hsp involvement in numerous autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune bullous diseases and celiac disease.



    Photo: CC--_chrisUK

    People with celiac disease, even with asymptomatic forms, often experience reduced bone density from metabolic bone disease. This led scientists to ask if dermatitis herpetiformis results in bone loss as celiac disease does.



    Photo: CC--mtkopone

    A team of researchers recently set out to determine if dermatitis herpetiformis triggers bone loss, as does celiac disease.



    Photo: CC - Anosmia
    In my experience growing up with undiagnosed celiac disease, I had to deal with several symptoms that my doctors had no answers for. One of the most frustrating of these was my skin troubles--Dermatitis Herpetiformis


    Photo: CC--Mangee
    About one in 100 people in America has celiac disease, while about one in four of those will develop dermatitis herpetiformis Duhring, which occurs when celiac disease manifests cutaneously, in the skin. Dermatitis herpetiformis Duhring is uncommon in children, with only 5% of cases appearing in children younger than 7 years. Most often, it presents in people over forty.

    A list of skin common skin disorders that can be caused by celiac disease, but if left undiagnosed, can be both painful and stressful.

    Scientists at the University of Finland have announced the discovery of a particular gene that is tied to the development of the celiac-associated skin disease dermatitis herpetiformis, which is the form of celiac disease found in a full 25% of all celiacs.

    The following are links to sites have of dermatitis herpetiformis. Some of the photos are biopsies


    The the connection between iodine and Dermatitis Herpetiformis is briefly described by the following

    Dermatitis Herpetiformis Summary A dermatologist who is experienced at recognizing dermatitis

    The following are excerpts from a lecture given by Dr Lionel Fry at the 1984 AGM in London. Dr

    Dr. Lionel Fry from the U.K. talked about DH. He stated that all patients with DH have some degree

    Iodine testing for DH: This is an old procedure used to create DH blisters. By applying a 30 pe

    The following was written by Dr. Joseph Murray, one of the leading USA physicians in the diagn

    The following report comes to us from The Sprue-Nik Press, which is published by the Tri-County

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