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Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Celiac Disease

This category contains summaries of research articles that deal with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and it's association with celiac disease. Most of the articles are research summaries that include the original source of the summary.


    Image: CC--Erica Firment

    Can a gluten-free diet help improve symptoms in people suffering from IBS? A new study says yes, some of them, at least.

    More than 60% of patients with IBS suffer from bloating and abdominal pain after eating certain foods. In some patients, who do not have celiac disease or wheat allergy, these symptoms may be due to an adverse reaction to wheat and gluten.



    Image: CC--Holly Lay

    IBS, also known as Irritable Bowel Syndrome, is a miserable condition. If you've ever had food poisoning or experienced Montezuma's revenge from travel, you have a good idea of how someone who suffers from IBS may feel. But while your food poisoning passed in a couple of days, imagine what it would be like to live like that each and every day.



    Photo: CC--Theilr

    How can doctors do a better job of spotting differences between IBS and celiac disease?



    Are some IBS patients really sensitive to wheat, gluten and FODMAPs? Photo: CC--Roy Blumenthal

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common types of functional bowel disorder. As researchers attempt to unravel the mysteries behind IBS, they have payed increasing attention to the possible impact of food and diet.



    Photo: CC--Mike Rolls

    Celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome patients have similar symptoms, which can result in celiac disease patients being misdiagnosed with IBS. Is there a connection?



    Photo: CC--Nana B. Agyei

    Numerous studies have shown that a high percentage of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are also sensitive to gluten.



    Photo: CC--Robert Huffstutter

    Is there any relationship between Irritable Bowel Disease and self-reported non-celiac gluten sensitivity? 



    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--Ernst Vikne

    A research team recently set out to determine rates of celiac disease in children with ongoing abdominal pain.



    Photo: CC--Rosefirerising

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) often occur together, and research indicates that many people with IBS plus FMS (IBS/FMS) might actually suffer from undiagnosed celiac disease.



    Photo: Public Domain--Wikicommons

    A team of researchers recently conducted a controlled trial of gluten-free diet in patients with irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea to gauge the effects on bowel frequency and intestinal function. Their goal was to determine whether a gluten-free diet might benefit patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D).



    Photo: CC--mag3737

    Patients with celiac disease often report symptoms compatible with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, there haven't been any systematic studies regarding how adherence to a gluten-free diet might affect rates of irritable bowel syndrome-type symptoms in patients with celiac disease.



    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is based on a clinical description only; there are no pathophysiological pathways definitively associated with it. It is characterized as gastrointestinal symptoms with no discernable cause.

    A team of researchers recently set out to explore the clinical and experimental evidence regarding the possible association between gluten sensitivity, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and the development of gastrointestinal symptoms.

    In the majority of people with celiac disease, strict adherence to a gluten-free diet can result in a quality of life that is on par with non-celiacs. Still a small percentage of celiacs seem to suffer from persistent gastrological discomfort in the form of irritable bowel or irritable-bowel-like symptoms.

    Aliment Pharmacol Ther 19(11):1199-1210, 2004. Celiac.com 06/08/2004 - Researchers at the Universit

    Mayo Clin Proc 2004;79:476-482. Celiac.com 05/25/2004 - The results of a study conducted by Dr. G.

    Celiac.com 09/30/2002 - The Canadian Medical Association Journal (Hoey, 2002;166:479-80) published

    Lancet Nov 2001 Volume 358, Number 9292 1504-08 03 Celiac.com 11/14/2001 - A recent study