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Gluten-Free Grains and Flours

This category is dedicated to articles by leading authors and experts on the various gluten-free grains that are grown throughout the world, including articles on gluten-free flours and their baking properties. In many cases we include summaries of scientific studies.
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Velvety buckwheat bread - sliced. Image: CC--Eric Fung

The most frequently used materials in the baking industry are wheat, rye, and barley flours. However, due to the presence of gluten, they cannot be used for gluten-free food production. Gluten-free products are characterized by a low content of nutrients such as protein and minerals which are important for meeting normal physiological requirements.



Low prices for wheat have some investors looking for value in the gluten-free markets. Photo: Billy Curtis

With low prices and slim margins, life is tough for people who trade in wheat, corn and soybeans these days. So much so that some traders are turning to obscure commodities like desert-grown tomatoes and chickpeas to turn a profit.Over the last several years, as farmers have produced far more of these crops than the marker can handle, margins for handling major grain crops have sunk.



A field of wheat awaits harvest in Kansas. Photo: CC--James Watkins

Can new wheat crops give celiac sufferers an alternative to a gluten-free diet? A new study published in the journal Food Chemistry shows that even the ancient varieties of wheat that have not been subject to hybridization, contain toxic epitopes that trigger adverse autoimmune response in celiac patients. What makes gluten toxic to people with celiac disease? Also, what is the relationship between various kinds of wheat and their celiac toxicity?



Will flour from cockroaches be the future of gluten-free baking? Photo: CC--SiamesePuppy

It's cheaper, more nutritious, and properly delicious. Will gluten-free flour made from cockroaches change the way bread is made? The latest issue of Munchies features a great article about two scientists from the Federal University of Rio Grande in Brazil, who have developed flour made from ground cockroaches that contains 40 percent more protein than normal wheat flour. Oh, and it happens to be gluten-free. Excited yet? Grossed out?



Can rinds from coffee beans become the future of gluten-free baking? Photo: CC--Larry Jacobson

Can a former Starbucks executive turn coffee flour into the environmentally green future of the gluten-free industry?



Image: CC--Clare Black

I believe that what you are actually doing, which is supported by an approximately $900K corporate grant (if I recall correctly), is to create a GMO version that you can patent in order to make money selling the seeds. This may not be necessary, as what you seek already exists naturally, and I did explain this to your cooperator years ago.



Popularity of whole grains soars, but wheat struggles to compete. Photo: CC--Neil Williamson

Whole grains, including gluten-free grains, have never been more popular, but as their fortunes grow as a whole, that of wheat is diminishing.



Image: CC--naturalflow

My latest obsession is creating new quinoa recipes, since my eight year old daughter absolutely loves it! Her favorite is warm quinoa with crumbled turkey sausage, broccoli, and lots of cumin. She also loves it with oil and balsamic vinegar. I like it cold with chopped veggies, garlic, and fresh squeezed lemon juice.



Is buckwheat DNA the secret to a gluten-free noodle revolution? Photo: CC--Ishikawa Ken

Exciting gluten-free news from Japan, where researchers say they have successfully sequenced the entire buckwheat genome. This is a big deal, because buckwheat flour offers certain advantages over numerous other gluten-free flours, especially in noodle making.



Image: CC--naturalflow

The top 8 food allergies in Canada are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, seafood, sesame, soy and wheat. If you have a food allergy and feel limited by it, it's a good idea to explore plant-based options. Plants offer so many benefits—they alkalize your body, reduce inflammation, beef up your vitamin, mineral, phytonutrient, antioxidant and fiber intake, and much more!



Image: CC--Image Catalog

One part of our natural protection from the microbes and toxins in our environment is the innate part of our immune systems. This includes everything from our skin, to the mucous we produce in various tissues which engulfs unwanted or harmful particles, isolating them and ultimately expelling them from the body in fecal matter and mucous, such as from our sinuses. While our immune systems have other components, it is the innate system that provides most of our protection from the world outside our bodies.



Gluten-free pulses are an excellent food staple for people with celiac disease. Photo: CC--Wikimedia Commons

The United Nations has declared 2016 as the "International Year of Pulses;" the dried, edible seeds of legume plants, which include things like pinto beans, kidney beans and navy beans; dry peas; lentils; and others.



Photo: CC--USDA

Kansas wheat farmers are funding genetic research to figure out exactly why some people struggle to digest wheat, and to try to produce an wheat-friendly alternative.



Globe amaranth in the field. Photo: CC--Swallowtail Garden Seeds

Here's an interesting little article on the various types of flour commonly used in Indian cooking, including a number of gluten-free flours.



Gluten-free cupcakes get some frosting. Photo: CC--Ariel Waldman

Can Nutrilac protein give manufacturers a way to make gluten-free products that are indistinguishable from products made with conventional flour?



Photo: CC--Paul

Kansas farmers grow a lot of wheat. People with celiac disease avoid wheat like the plague. Not only are people with celiac disease avoiding wheat, but the vast majority of people who avoid wheat now do so for non-medical reasons.



Photo: CC--WholeJourneys

Almost half of Americans eat no whole grains at all and those who do eat them only consume a single serving per day—far below the 3 to 5 daily servings recommended by the USDA. People often tell me, "I might eat more whole grains if I just knew which ones to choose and how to prepare them."



Photo: Wikimedia Commons SA3.0

There have been claims that certain strains of wheat, especially ancient strains, such as einkorn, do not trigger adverse reactions in people with celiac disease, or that they trigger less severe reactions.



Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Could high-protein flour made out of crickets change the future of gluten-free foods? One company thinks so.



Photo: CC--bluemoose

The people who grow wheat think they might have a solution for people with celiac disease: Genetically modified wheat.


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