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Additional Celiac Disease Concerns

This category covers everything from dealing with celiac disease, schools, hospital stays, quality of life issues, camps, pets and gluten, dealing with relatives, and much more.

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    Two parents in face charges that their son died because they fed him an alternative gluten-free diet. Photo: CC--Dr Les (Leszek - Leslie) Sachs

    After their seven-month-old baby died weighing less than 10 pounds, a mother and father in Beveren, Belgium, are standing trial on charges that they starved the child by negligently providing an alternative gluten-free diet, with no medical supervision.

    The couple, who ran a natural food store, put their son Lucas on an alternative gluten-free, lactose-free diet, which included quinoa milk, despite doctors describing it as unsuitable for developing infants.



    Would it resemble this strain of amaranth? Photo: CC--@withcuriosity

    Anyone eager to try Whurple, the purple strain of gluten-free wheat reported by the State Collegian, will have to wait quite a while.

    It seems that the Collegian's report of the development by a Kansas State agriculture student was, in fact, merely a thinly disguised April Fool's Day joke.



    Image: CC--liz west

    Did you know that now, according to Beyond Celiac 83% of those with celiac disease are misdiagnosed or undiagnosed? Did you know that the average time a person waits to be correctly diagnosed, according to Daniel Lefler, M.D., M.S, of the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconness Medical Center is still six to 10 years?



    Photo: CC--pizzawhale

    What do you say to someone who doesn't "get" the fact that gluten makes people sick? It's not that people are intentionally callous and uncaring. They simply don't understand that going gluten-free isn't a fad or a choice for most people. This means that all too often when it comes to eating, they are perfectly content to go their merry way and eat whatever they want and if you're with them, well, you'll figure out something to eat.



    Image: CC--yamaguchi yoshiaki

    Japan's ANA airline is catching some public relations heat this week after reports that a man flying from Tokyo to Australia received a banana instead of the gluten-free meal that he booked in advance.

    London resident, and celiac disease sufferer, Martin Pavelka flew All Nippon Airways flight from Tokyo this week, a nine-hour flight.



    Photo: CC--Cody Jung

    Celiac disease is associated with numerous chronic conditions, such as anemia and malabsorption of some critical vitamins. Changes in the gastrointestinal tract, rates of gastric emptying, and gastric pH are responsible for impaired vitamin and mineral absorption.

    Intestinal CYP3A4 levels may also be disrupted, which may have implications in first-pass metabolism for some drugs that are substrates for this drug metabolizing enzyme.



    Photo: CC--Mike Mozart

    The fallout continues from General Mills' recall of nearly 2 million boxes of Gluten Free Cheerios and Honey Nut Cheerios in 2015, which occurred after workers at a California plant accidentally loaded gluten-free oat flour into trucks that had been holding wheat flour, which contains gluten, and which then contaminated batches of "gluten-free" cereal produced with the grain from those trucks.

    In comments to the U.S. Ninth Circuit court, plaintiffs representing a proposed class of consumers claimed that a lower court had erred in dismissing their lawsuit on the grounds that the company's recall program made the claims baseless.



    Photo: CC--TheMonnie

    More people than ever are following a gluten-free diet, but does the diet carry health risks that could cause harm in the long run? That's a very possible scenario, according to a report published in the journal Epidemiology.

    The report presents strong data to suggest that numerous gluten-free food staples contain high levels of toxic metals, which means that many gluten-free eaters could face higher risks for cancer and other chronic illnesses.



    Photo: CC-- Martin Criminale

    To mark the start of Coeliac Awareness Week, Coeliac Australia and Nestlé Professional have launched Gluten Free Online Training – an interactive learning resource for foodservice professionals looking to expand their understanding of gluten free food practice throughout the hospitality industry.

    Under the guidance of Australian chef and author Tobie Puttock, the project will train up to 30,000 students at all TAFEs and culinary institutes in the protocols for gluten-free food preparation and service.



    Photo: CC--Hiroshi Yoshinaga

    Imagine going to restaurants in the future and having your gluten-free food made and prepared to order using a 3D printer. That is the future envisioned by WASP, an Italian company on a mission to use 3D printing technology to solve serious problems that afflict people.

    WASP is in the business of improving quality of life through 3D printing, from spinal care to architecture to athletics, including their latest effort with celiac disease.



    Gluten-free eateries are increasingly popular at US colleges. Photo: CC--Mr. Gray

    The March news regarding new gluten-free eateries shows that the most impactful news coming out of US colleges is about more than just basketball.

    The gluten-free eating scene at US colleges is enjoying a surge of popularity, as more schools are catering to the dietary needs of students with food allergies and sensitivities with dedicated facilities and inspired food offerings.

    With the recent reopening of Risley Dining hall, Cornell University welcomes the second certified gluten-free college eatery in the U.S., following Kent State.



    Brutal honesty helps Girl Scout crush cookie sales record. Photo: CC--JayJayOh

    A savvy Girl Scout from New Jersey is close to selling more cookies than anyone in history thanks to her brutal reviews of the sweet treats that have gone viral. Employing brutally honest cookie reviews, skilled networking and aggressive sales tactics, 11-year-old Charlotte McCourt set a new Girl Scout cookie-selling world record by selling 21,477 boxes of cookies, shattering the 35 year old previous record.



    Is Starbucks' new breakfast sandwich really gluten-free? Photo: Starbucks Gluten-free Breakfast Sandwich--Starbucks

    Starbucks has a new Gluten-Free Breakfast Sandwich that looks yummy. But, why does their website feature a disclaimer saying the company cannot guarantee the absence of allergens, including wheat?

    The company website uses boldface type to tout the "gluten-free"-ness of the new offering, noting that the sandwich uses a "gluten-free roll," is "prepared in a certified gluten-free environment," and sealed "in its own oven-safe parchment bag to avoid any cross-contamination." Sounds good, so far, perhaps even safe for celiacs.



    Image: CC--zaimoku_woodpile

    Allergens in processed foods can be a significant problem in the confectionery industry. In the European Union, current estimates suggest that 17 million people suffer from food allergies and in recent years, the number of children under five years with significant food allergies has grown. Therefore, it is important to keep track of information and raise awareness among consumers and producers.



    Image: CC--franck blais

    Do you have an autoimmune disease? Does someone you know? Did you know that the numbers regarding autoimmune rates are all over the place, and that incomplete or wrong information can result in delayed or missed diagnoses? Want to help researchers create a database that will help them understand exactly how many people are living with autoimmune conditions?



    Are prescriptions the best way to help cealiac sufferers in the UK? Photo: CC--Mike Licht

    Attack on prescriptions for celiac sufferers sparks strong debate. The Brits are having a bit of a dustup over the best way to help people support with celiac disease. Currently, Britain's National Health Service supplies prescriptions for gluten-free food staples for people with celiac disease. Seemingly, no one disagrees with medical experts that celiac suffers should get support from the National Health Service to buy certain staple gluten-free products.



    Do people with celiac disease face higher levels of arsenic and mercury levels? Photo: CC--Matt Brubeck

    Could increased exposure to arsenic and mercury be unintended consequences of eating a gluten-free diet? Do people who eat a gluten-free diet face an increased exposure to toxic metals like arsenic and mercury, and thus possibly higher rates of cardiovascular disease, cancer and neurological effects? That's a very possible scenario, according to a report published in the journal Epidemiology.



    Photo: CC--Fimb

    Have wheat and gluten changed over time? Is the wheat we consume today substantially different to the wheat we ate fifty or one-hundred years ago? These are interesting questions that have invited a good deal of speculation, but so far, at least, no good answers.



    Image: CC--mim gf

    There's been a great deal of excitement, and plenty of confusion, among celiac sufferers about a drug that breaks down gluten into harmless smaller molecules. The good news is that the drug, GluteGuard, has shown some early promise in treating mild gluten intolerance randomized human trials. The drug is also currently available in UK and Australia, as a "complementary medicine," a category does not require any proof that it actually works.



    Food Equality Initiative is the first food pantry for kid with food allergies. Photo: Food Equality Initiative--Allison Long/The Kansas City Star via AP

    Feeding kids restricted to a "special" diet due to food allergies or sensitivities can be both challenging and expensive. Two Kansas moms turned their experience meeting those challenges with their own children into a full-blown community service, dedicated to helping parents feed kids with food allergies on the cheap.


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