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Additional Celiac Disease Concerns

This category covers everything from dealing with celiac disease, schools, hospital stays, quality of life issues, camps, pets and gluten, dealing with relatives, and much more.

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    It was five years ago when I launched the concept of "gluten is bad for us all!"
    Yes, you read that right - bad for you, bad for me, and bad for everyone else! This implies that the whole world should avoid gluten.

    This is a bold and an unrealistic statement to make. However, I thought that there was enough evidence about the harm of gluten for us to demand massive changes to everyone's diet, our farming practices and food manufacturing industry. Eventually, this could substantially improve the health of our Nations. However the practicalities of such a change would be very difficult overcome. Especially with the economic forces of Big-Pharma, Big-Agriculture and Big-Government.



    UK National Health Service has announced cuts to gluten-free prescriptions. Photo: CC--SludgeG

    In the face of budget cuts, and in a move that may offer a glimpse of things to come, doctors with the the UK's National Health Service are eliminating gluten-free food prescriptions for adults, beginning in parts of Devon.

    As of July 1, the Northern, Eastern and Western Devon Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) responsible for planning and buying the majority of healthcare services for local people have recommended limiting gluten free foods including bread, pasta, flour and multipurpose mixes, to under 18 years of age.



    Finland has one of the world's highest celiac rates, and gluten-free food is common. Photo: CC--Sepi V.

    Ever wondered what life is like in the celiac disease capital of the world?

    In Finland, an estimated 2.4 percent of adults from 30 to 64 years old, and one in 99 children are diagnosed with celiac disease. The country also holds the record for the most overall cases of the celiac disease in the world. If ever there was a world headquarters for celiac disease, it would be Finland.



    Why is it still so hard to make good gluten-free food? Photo: CC--Andreanna Moya

    What are the main challenges in developing good gluten-free foods?

    With the explosion of gluten-free products, food manufacturers have worked to master the challenges of formulating gluten-free products that are both tasty and nutritious.

    This effort has paid dividends in the last years is due, in part, to advances in formulation, ingredient sourcing, and a focus on making products delicious.



    Jordan phosphate mines. Image: CC--Kat Masback

    Dietary phosphorus occurs naturally in foods like dairy products, animal meats and legumes. The institute of Medicine recommended dietary allowance (RDA) is 700 mg/day while the NHANES data indicates that the typical American consumes more than twice that every day.Phosphorus is considered an essential nutrient but it is increasingly being added to processed foods via additives (anti-caking agents to preserve moisture and color) or as a stabilizer, leavening agent or acidifier.



    Zeus, an Australian Shepherd like the one pictured here, has learned to warn its owner if food contains gluten. Photo: CC--Paul Schadler

    Humans rely on powerful canine noses to do so many things, including sniffing for drugs, bombs and even cancer.

    Now, some dogs are being trained to serve their masters by sniffing out gluten.

    Trained to help some of the 3 million Americans who have celiac disease, gluten sniffing dogs can be a tremendous boon to their owners, especially those who are highly sensitive.



    Image: CC--kuchenkainternetowa

    A UK man has filed a lawsuit against a local bar and grill after becoming sick on a gyro salad that servers led him to believe was gluten-free.

    The Webster Groves resident, Phillip "Gus" Wagner alleges that servers at Michael's Bar & Grill in Manchester, provided inaccurate information about the dish, and that he suffered an adverse reaction to the gluten in the dish that left him with "severe and permanent injuries."



    Chic-fil-A has introduced its new gluten-free bun. Photo: CC--M01229

    Fast food chain Chic-fil-A chain has announced the launch of a gluten-free bun. This means that people with celiac disease can now enjoy something like the full Chick-fil-A experience.

    Made from quinoa and amaranth, the 150-calorie buns will cost an extra $1.15, according to a report by Fortune magazine, which also noted that patrons must assemble the sandwich themselves to lessen the risk of cross-contamination.



    Photo: CC--Bormang2

    Once upon a time, maintaining a gluten-free diet was a challenge, especially for college kids. In many ways, it still is, as college students face numerous challenges that others do not.

    However, things are changing, and much of that change is being driven by colleges and universities seeking to better serve their students with food sensitivities and allergies. More and more, colleges in America are doing more to step up their food services for their students with food allergies and sensitivities.



    An undergraduate researcher hopes her project will help people adjust more easily to having celiac disease. Photo: CC--Jimmy James

    Calgary University's Faculty of Arts and Markin Undergraduate Student Research program is designed to give recipients a leg up on research projects that can help advance their academic goals.For one such recipient, Karen Tang, those goals include helping individuals "to effectively self-manage celiac disease and follow a strict gluten-free diet, by teaching people evidence-based strategies."



    A man is seeking surgery for baggy skin after gluten-free diet. Photo: CC--Automobile Italia

    A long-time pasta lover with celiac disease is desperately fundraising for surgery after losing half his body weight on a gluten-free diet.

    Years of eating lots of pasta and high calorie meals had left Christopher DeLorenzo weighing over 400 pounds. "My grandparents were Italian so I grew up eating lots of pasta…all I would do was eat, eat, eat always pasta and pizza, my stomach was like an endless pit," said the Phillipsburg, New Jersey, native.



    Image: CC--Jonathan Silverberg

    Dr. Alessio Fasano from the University of Maryland's Celiac Research Center published a paper in Clinical and Developmental Immunology last month. It focused on a new drug developed by Dr. Fasano that has shown promising results in both animal and human trials. But is this the 'magic pill' that will cure celiac disease and gluten sensitivity? Let's take a look.



    Are consumers being misled by gluten-free foods? Photo: CC--Elaine with Grey Cats

    Are consumers wrongly assuming gluten-free foods to be nutritionally equivalent to their gluten-containing counterparts? Are they being mislead?

    That's the subject of a recent talk presented at the 50th Annual Congress of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN). Among the evidence cited was that gluten-free items have a significantly higher energy content and a different nutritional composition to their gluten-containing counterparts.



    Image: CC--me5otron

    More and more people are avoiding gluten these days, even folks who do not have a medical reason to do so.

    Perhaps looking to take advantage of the popularity of gluten-free dieting, or perhaps hoping their targets are easily fooled, one cheeky police department in California is offer to run a gluten check on people's meth.



    Image: CC--Donnie Ray Jones

    After thirty three years of a self indulgent relationship with food, my life hit rock bottom and took an unexpected turn, for what momentarily seems to be the worst. As spontaneous and adventurous as I am, I decided to challenge myself and make my already horrid situation, even worse. Or, as you will come to see, surprisingly better.



    Image: CC--DVIDSHUB

    Though I tried to avoid eating with locals, it seemed to come up over and over again. Military duties frequently required me to work and meet with the locals to facilitate contracts we had in place and ensure work was done properly. At various times and locations, I traveled with a small group of other soldiers among a larger population of Afghans. Many of the Afghans carried weapons, such as the AK-47, and had them slung over their shoulders.



    Image: CC--Jamie Beverly

    No parent likes to see their child ill. This is most especially true of a newborn. The baby feels sick, perhaps has a fever, and often all they do is cry, look miserable and no one gets any sleep. So while we can all agree that it's no fun, could keeping your baby healthy actually prevent a lifetime of celiac disease?The answer is quite possibly 'yes' based on a recent study published in BioMed Central Pediatrics.



    Two parents in face charges that their son died because they fed him an alternative gluten-free diet. Photo: CC--Dr Les (Leszek - Leslie) Sachs

    After their seven-month-old baby died weighing less than 10 pounds, a mother and father in Beveren, Belgium, are standing trial on charges that they starved the child by negligently providing an alternative gluten-free diet, with no medical supervision.

    The couple, who ran a natural food store, put their son Lucas on an alternative gluten-free, lactose-free diet, which included quinoa milk, despite doctors describing it as unsuitable for developing infants.



    Would it resemble this strain of amaranth? Photo: CC--@withcuriosity

    Anyone eager to try Whurple, the purple strain of gluten-free wheat reported by the State Collegian, will have to wait quite a while.

    It seems that the Collegian's report of the development by a Kansas State agriculture student was, in fact, merely a thinly disguised April Fool's Day joke.



    Image: CC--liz west

    Did you know that now, according to Beyond Celiac 83% of those with celiac disease are misdiagnosed or undiagnosed? Did you know that the average time a person waits to be correctly diagnosed, according to Daniel Lefler, M.D., M.S, of the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconness Medical Center is still six to 10 years?


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