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Additional Celiac Disease Concerns

This category covers everything from dealing with celiac disease, schools, hospital stays, quality of life issues, camps, pets and gluten, dealing with relatives, and much more.

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    Photo: Dawn Huczek

    More and more, people are adopting a gluten-free diet due to perceived health and weight-loss benefits.

    A team of researchers recently set out to ask people with celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity about their views on the health effects of gluten, and safety of vaccines and gluten-free food products.



    Image: CC--Jimmy G

    Gluten-free, food allergies and celiac disease have reached the media in the form of jokes and ridicule. This is a serious development because the media influences viewer's day-today reactions to various social situations. In many ways, TV becomes a role model for social interactions. DeVault (1991) says that "an enormous body of science, literature and even humor tells us how a middle-class man and woman might 'do' family life" (p. 16). This is the fundamental reason why the media jabs about gluten-free and food allergies are so impactful. What we see on TV, we emulate in life. If 'doing gluten free' is something to be ridiculed, as with the examples below, then those of us with food allergies need to unite our voices to be heard in public forums to change this practice.



    Photo: CC--401(k)2012

    Armed with a Harvard MBA, Christine Rohrbeck was one of the few women to reach the top of the secretive, richly paid world of hedge funds.

    Still in her 30s, Rohrbeck was one of only two women out of 50 investment professionals employed at Baupost Group, one of the largest and most successful hedge funds. A rising star at the company, Rohrbeck would earn a $3.75 million bonus for her performance in 2014.



    Photo: CC--Waferboard

    Because gluten is vital to the texture, structure and stretch of pasta, replicating pasta without gluten is especially difficult. It's even harder for fresh pastas, and harder still for filled pastas, like ravioli and tortellini.

    In the case of pasta, the trick is to get the pasta to stretch around the filling. In traditional fresh pastas, the stretch comes from gluten in the wheat flour.



    Photo: CC--Jordan Ferencz

    The Canadian Celiac Association (CCA) finds itself facing questions of rumor-mongering and inaccuracy in the face of its ongoing comments about General Mills and Gluten Free Cheerios.

    When confronted with simple questions, the group refused to stand by their previous statements, refused to provide clarification, and refused to provide evidence. Not a single box.



    Image: CC--christian schnettelker

    Quaker was having a problem with its gluten-free oatmeal. Overall, the batches of oats it was using contained under 20 ppm gluten, and thus are considered gluten-free. But somehow, isolated kernels of wheat, barley or rye flakes were making their way into the final oatmeal products and onto store shelves.

    Because these kernels were rolled flat the same way as the oats, it was possible for one of these flakes to find its way into a bowl of otherwise gluten-free oats, and to render the bowl over the 20 ppm standard, meaning it is technically not gluten-free, according to FDA standard.



    Photo: CC--Gruyere

    Wellington's Victoria University is the first institution of its kind in New Zealand to receive a full Celiac accreditation for its residence dining halls.

    Under a new partnership between Coeliac NZ and Compass, the company that provides food and support services to the six residence Halls at Victoria, the university achieved gluten-free accreditation through independent auditing company SGS in August 2017.



    Photo; CC-- Tony Alter

    A Miami teenager has created what may be the nation's first kosher gluten-free food bank.

    Diagnosed with celiac disease at just 7 years old, Aaron Kredi has worked to help numerous newly diagnosed celiac children in South Florida as they switch to gluten-free food.

    When he started working with the Jewish Community Services Kosher Food Bank in North Miami Beach, he noticed that residents with celiac disease had very few gluten-free choices.



    Photo: CC--MBTrama

    Do you have an emergency survival kit at home should disaster strike? Does that include drinking water and gluten-free provisions for at least a few days?

    The fallout from the latest string of disasters still looms over parts of America; over Houston, Florida and neighboring states devastated by Hurricanes and by resulting floods; and over northern California communities devastated by wildfires.

    That got us thinking about emergency kits. Gluten-Free-free emergency kits, to be precise.

    What's in Your Emergency Gluten-Free Food Kit? 



    Photo: CC--Quinn Dombrowski

    One reason conventional beers remain unsafe for people with celiac disease is that they contain gluten that push the finished product over the 20ppm standard for gluten-free products. Such gluten fragments in conventional beers render them unsuitable for people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance.

    There's been some confusion about the best ways to measure gluten levels in fermented foods and beverages. That confusion has prompted more confusion over the methods used to remove gluten from beers brewed with traditional barley. Are such beers gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease?



    Photo: CC--Bernard Sprague. NZ

    Talk about finding needles in a haystack. Imagine, if you will, sifting through rail cars full of oats and plucking out nearly every stray grain of wheat, barley or rye so that the final product tests at under 20 ppm, instead of the original 200 ppm to 1,000 ppm.

    Quite a challenge, yes? It's a challenge General Mills take on every day as it produces Gluten Free Cheerios from raw oats into the final product. According to their website, General Mills ships 500,000 cases of Cheerios each week.

    To do this, General Mills uses a proprietary optical sorting process, for which it has filed a patent with the US Patent Office. That process sifts through those rail cars of oats, with stray gluten ranging from 200 ppm to 1,000 ppm, and "takes it down to less than 20" ppm, said Paul Wehling, principal scientist for General Mills.



    Image: CC--cchana

    A press release by the Canadian Celiac Association announcing a label change for General Mills' Cheerios is drawing confusion and questions from numerous corners of the gluten-free community.

    The press release is also drawing pushback from General Mills, which called the CCA press release "inaccurate," and said it was "not based on facts."

    General Mills spokesman Mike Siemienas says that "the only thing the CCA got right is that General Mills is changing its label in Canada." Everything else, Siemienas, claimed, was based on opinion, not facts.



    Image: CC--Jordan Ferencz

    Cereal maker General Mills has announced that it will no longer label their flagship cereal Cheerios as gluten-free in Canada.

    Has Canada Changed its Gluten-free Standards?

    • No, the standard for labeling gluten-free foods in Canada remains same, at up to 20 ppm allowable gluten. Such foods are safe for the vast majority of people with celiac disease, according to both U.S. and Canadian regulatory agencies, the EU, celiac researchers and numerous celiac disease support groups.


    Can anything help falling global wheat prices? Photo: CC--Martin Pettitt

    Global wheat prices are plummeting in the wake of massive overstocks and anemic consumption. The problem is serious enough that Canada, the world’s top producer of durum wheat, has cut its production nearly in half, to a six-year low.

    Even those drastic measures have had failed to raise prices, which are down about 30 percent from 2016.



    Photo: CC--See Ming Lee

    A Merrill Lynch broker in Denver has sued the firm in federal court, claiming that its systemic "sabotage" of his relationship with clients during and following two medical leaves have cost him hundreds of thousands of dollars.

    In a case filed this summer in federal court in Colorado, Kirk Kringel, a broker with Merrill since 2010, alleges that the company violated his rights under the Family Medical Leave Act by retaliating against him for taking the two medical leaves, including one that was related to celiac disease.



    Image: CC--bodegón simple

    Gluten-free doesn't have to be complicated or confusing. It can be easy and delicious without thinking twice about the processed foods in the food stores. Simply eat Clean. What's Clean, you say? It's about eating real, wholesome, naturally gluten-free foods and steering clear of processed, packaged foods.



    Our Ultimate Gluten-Free Candy Listing! Image: CC--jeannette_s

    Halloween is once again upon us, and that means candy galore, and plenty of questions about gluten-free candy. Here is Celiac.com's list of Safe Gluten-free Candy for Halloween 2017.

    This year, we offer our most up-to-date list of safe, gluten-free Halloween candies, and anther list of candies to watch out for. Below our SAFE, GLUTEN-FREE Halloween candy list, you will find a list of UNSAFE, NON–GLUTEN–FREE candies, along with a partial list of major candy makers, links to their company websites, and other resources.



    Grain industry study touts benefits of bread. Photo: CC--Kevin Dooley

    As people eat less processed foods, and more people adopt a gluten-free diet, manufacturers are selling less and less refined wheat flour, less bread, rolls, and cereals.

    Consumption of wheat is plummeting, and that has the people who grow wheat wondering what to do.

    Well, one thing wheat growers can do is hire researchers to study the problem in such a way that the logical conclusion is that foods made from refined grains, such as breads, rolls, and cereals, aren’t really that bad after all.



    Bodyshamers didn't seem to know that Megan McKenna was fighting celiac disease, IBS. Photo: Mirror UK

    What is it about the Internet that seems to bring out the worst in some people? In this case, internet trolls making nasty comments about reality star and popular UK country singer Megan McKenna.

    The body-shaming began almost immediately after McKenna posted two photos of herself on Instagram this summer. According to BuzzFeed, comments calling her things like "boney" and a "skinny rat," flooded in.

    McKenna recently explained that, at the time the photos were taken, she was in the hospital dealing with the the effects of a medical condition.



    Image: CC--ap220859

    In Pennsylvania, there is a six-year-old little girl (we'll call her Amy) who has not been allowed to see her mother (we'll call her Cindy) since June 21st because Amy's dad takes issue with a diet that excludes gluten and other allergenic foods. You might think that this is due to a dispute arising out of the dissolution of a marriage, but that is not the case. However, I'm getting ahead of myself. I need to start describing this situation as it began about six years ago, when her father was arrested for public drunkenness, resisting arrest, and creating a public disturbance, when Amy was less than a year old. Dad (we'll call him Steve) struggled with unemployment and part-time employment as a truck driver, falling further and further into arrears on his child support payments. Cindy had primary custody, and every second weekend, Steve took care of Amy.


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