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Additional Celiac Disease Concerns

This category covers everything from dealing with celiac disease, schools, hospital stays, quality of life issues, camps, pets and gluten, dealing with relatives, and much more.

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    A man is seeking surgery for baggy skin after gluten-free diet. Photo: CC--Automobile Italia

    A long-time pasta lover with celiac disease is desperately fundraising for surgery after losing half his body weight on a gluten-free diet.

    Years of eating lots of pasta and high calorie meals had left Christopher DeLorenzo weighing over 400 pounds. "My grandparents were Italian so I grew up eating lots of pasta…all I would do was eat, eat, eat always pasta and pizza, my stomach was like an endless pit," said the Phillipsburg, New Jersey, native.



    Image: CC--Jonathan Silverberg

    Dr. Alessio Fasano from the University of Maryland's Celiac Research Center published a paper in Clinical and Developmental Immunology last month. It focused on a new drug developed by Dr. Fasano that has shown promising results in both animal and human trials. But is this the 'magic pill' that will cure celiac disease and gluten sensitivity? Let's take a look.



    Are consumers being misled by gluten-free foods? Photo: CC--Elaine with Grey Cats

    Are consumers wrongly assuming gluten-free foods to be nutritionally equivalent to their gluten-containing counterparts? Are they being mislead?

    That's the subject of a recent talk presented at the 50th Annual Congress of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN). Among the evidence cited was that gluten-free items have a significantly higher energy content and a different nutritional composition to their gluten-containing counterparts.



    Image: CC--me5otron

    More and more people are avoiding gluten these days, even folks who do not have a medical reason to do so.

    Perhaps looking to take advantage of the popularity of gluten-free dieting, or perhaps hoping their targets are easily fooled, one cheeky police department in California is offer to run a gluten check on people's meth.



    Image: CC--Donnie Ray Jones

    After thirty three years of a self indulgent relationship with food, my life hit rock bottom and took an unexpected turn, for what momentarily seems to be the worst. As spontaneous and adventurous as I am, I decided to challenge myself and make my already horrid situation, even worse. Or, as you will come to see, surprisingly better.



    Image: CC--DVIDSHUB

    Though I tried to avoid eating with locals, it seemed to come up over and over again. Military duties frequently required me to work and meet with the locals to facilitate contracts we had in place and ensure work was done properly. At various times and locations, I traveled with a small group of other soldiers among a larger population of Afghans. Many of the Afghans carried weapons, such as the AK-47, and had them slung over their shoulders.



    Image: CC--Jamie Beverly

    No parent likes to see their child ill. This is most especially true of a newborn. The baby feels sick, perhaps has a fever, and often all they do is cry, look miserable and no one gets any sleep. So while we can all agree that it's no fun, could keeping your baby healthy actually prevent a lifetime of celiac disease?The answer is quite possibly 'yes' based on a recent study published in BioMed Central Pediatrics.



    Two parents in face charges that their son died because they fed him an alternative gluten-free diet. Photo: CC--Dr Les (Leszek - Leslie) Sachs

    After their seven-month-old baby died weighing less than 10 pounds, a mother and father in Beveren, Belgium, are standing trial on charges that they starved the child by negligently providing an alternative gluten-free diet, with no medical supervision.

    The couple, who ran a natural food store, put their son Lucas on an alternative gluten-free, lactose-free diet, which included quinoa milk, despite doctors describing it as unsuitable for developing infants.



    Would it resemble this strain of amaranth? Photo: CC--@withcuriosity

    Anyone eager to try Whurple, the purple strain of gluten-free wheat reported by the State Collegian, will have to wait quite a while.

    It seems that the Collegian's report of the development by a Kansas State agriculture student was, in fact, merely a thinly disguised April Fool's Day joke.



    Image: CC--liz west

    Did you know that now, according to Beyond Celiac 83% of those with celiac disease are misdiagnosed or undiagnosed? Did you know that the average time a person waits to be correctly diagnosed, according to Daniel Lefler, M.D., M.S, of the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconness Medical Center is still six to 10 years?



    Photo: CC--pizzawhale

    What do you say to someone who doesn't "get" the fact that gluten makes people sick? It's not that people are intentionally callous and uncaring. They simply don't understand that going gluten-free isn't a fad or a choice for most people. This means that all too often when it comes to eating, they are perfectly content to go their merry way and eat whatever they want and if you're with them, well, you'll figure out something to eat.



    Image: CC--yamaguchi yoshiaki

    Japan's ANA airline is catching some public relations heat this week after reports that a man flying from Tokyo to Australia received a banana instead of the gluten-free meal that he booked in advance.

    London resident, and celiac disease sufferer, Martin Pavelka flew All Nippon Airways flight from Tokyo this week, a nine-hour flight.



    Photo: CC--Cody Jung

    Celiac disease is associated with numerous chronic conditions, such as anemia and malabsorption of some critical vitamins. Changes in the gastrointestinal tract, rates of gastric emptying, and gastric pH are responsible for impaired vitamin and mineral absorption.

    Intestinal CYP3A4 levels may also be disrupted, which may have implications in first-pass metabolism for some drugs that are substrates for this drug metabolizing enzyme.



    Photo: CC--Mike Mozart

    The fallout continues from General Mills' recall of nearly 2 million boxes of Gluten Free Cheerios and Honey Nut Cheerios in 2015, which occurred after workers at a California plant accidentally loaded gluten-free oat flour into trucks that had been holding wheat flour, which contains gluten, and which then contaminated batches of "gluten-free" cereal produced with the grain from those trucks.

    In comments to the U.S. Ninth Circuit court, plaintiffs representing a proposed class of consumers claimed that a lower court had erred in dismissing their lawsuit on the grounds that the company's recall program made the claims baseless.



    Photo: CC--TheMonnie

    More people than ever are following a gluten-free diet, but does the diet carry health risks that could cause harm in the long run? That's a very possible scenario, according to a report published in the journal Epidemiology.

    The report presents strong data to suggest that numerous gluten-free food staples contain high levels of toxic metals, which means that many gluten-free eaters could face higher risks for cancer and other chronic illnesses.



    Photo: CC-- Martin Criminale

    To mark the start of Coeliac Awareness Week, Coeliac Australia and Nestlé Professional have launched Gluten Free Online Training – an interactive learning resource for foodservice professionals looking to expand their understanding of gluten free food practice throughout the hospitality industry.

    Under the guidance of Australian chef and author Tobie Puttock, the project will train up to 30,000 students at all TAFEs and culinary institutes in the protocols for gluten-free food preparation and service.



    Photo: CC--Hiroshi Yoshinaga

    Imagine going to restaurants in the future and having your gluten-free food made and prepared to order using a 3D printer. That is the future envisioned by WASP, an Italian company on a mission to use 3D printing technology to solve serious problems that afflict people.

    WASP is in the business of improving quality of life through 3D printing, from spinal care to architecture to athletics, including their latest effort with celiac disease.



    Gluten-free eateries are increasingly popular at US colleges. Photo: CC--Mr. Gray

    The March news regarding new gluten-free eateries shows that the most impactful news coming out of US colleges is about more than just basketball.

    The gluten-free eating scene at US colleges is enjoying a surge of popularity, as more schools are catering to the dietary needs of students with food allergies and sensitivities with dedicated facilities and inspired food offerings.

    With the recent reopening of Risley Dining hall, Cornell University welcomes the second certified gluten-free college eatery in the U.S., following Kent State.



    Brutal honesty helps Girl Scout crush cookie sales record. Photo: CC--JayJayOh

    A savvy Girl Scout from New Jersey is close to selling more cookies than anyone in history thanks to her brutal reviews of the sweet treats that have gone viral. Employing brutally honest cookie reviews, skilled networking and aggressive sales tactics, 11-year-old Charlotte McCourt set a new Girl Scout cookie-selling world record by selling 21,477 boxes of cookies, shattering the 35 year old previous record.



    Is Starbucks' new breakfast sandwich really gluten-free? Photo: Starbucks Gluten-free Breakfast Sandwich--Starbucks

    Starbucks has a new Gluten-Free Breakfast Sandwich that looks yummy. But, why does their website feature a disclaimer saying the company cannot guarantee the absence of allergens, including wheat?

    The company website uses boldface type to tout the "gluten-free"-ness of the new offering, noting that the sandwich uses a "gluten-free roll," is "prepared in a certified gluten-free environment," and sealed "in its own oven-safe parchment bag to avoid any cross-contamination." Sounds good, so far, perhaps even safe for celiacs.


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